Wood Burning Stoves And Sinus Problems [Archive] - Honda Ridgeline Owners Club Forums

: Wood Burning Stoves And Sinus Problems


UglyTruckling
03-14-2006, 09:14 PM
We use a little Jotul wood burning stove to heat our house. We have a relatively small house (1100 sq. ft.), and this stove is very efficient, keeping the main living areas of our house as warm as we want, and the bedrooms a little bit cooler. It's got a good EPA rating, so theoretically it's not putting out a bunch of goop into our valley air. We burn hard woods (almond and oak).

But... my husband and I have both developed annoying sinus problems since we've been using the wood stove (four years). I read somewhere about a study done in Canada that connected sinus problems to wood burning stoves.

I'm hoping to conduct my own little informal "study" here, for curiosity's sake. I'd appreciate your input.

25 Year Honda Owner
03-14-2006, 09:34 PM
We have a Buck stove in our basement den. Matter of fact we have a nice fire going tonight. No problems with sinus and I have had my share of sinus over the years. Only problem I have noticed is a little wood smoke oder in the den when the humidity is high and no fire.

Webwader
03-14-2006, 10:12 PM
UT, what's the humidity level in your house? If the wood stove is lowering the humidity too low, that might be a possible cause of sinus problems.

Outhouse
03-14-2006, 10:21 PM
I have, IMHO, the worst sinuses in the Universe. I have had surgery three times and have to go to the Dr. at least once a quarter to be scoped. The genesis of my problem is fungus. I live in Memphis, TN area and the climate here in the summer is akin to an armpit!:eek:

UglyTruckling
03-15-2006, 01:43 AM
Low humidity IS something my husband's told me he thinks is an issue in our house. We had an iron kettle we would put on the stove top with water in it, but I thought I could smell a metallic smell when we used it -- and I could never get the water level just right -- it either simmered up out of the spout, or it simmered dry overnight. I didn't like it. Maybe we need to look back into this, though....

ridgeNH
03-15-2006, 08:02 AM
Get a wood pellet stove, we heated the house all winter this year with ours.

Hez
03-15-2006, 08:56 AM
Wood stoves are notorious for causing all kinds of respiratory problems including asthma in chilidren. And they are terrible for the environment with all the hydrocarbons spuwed unfiltered into the air. I personally don't think they are a clean or healthy way to heat your house.

I get the smoke sucked in my air exchanger from three woodstoves and some days my whole house reeks of burnt wood. Drives me nuts (but that is a whole other story).

:rolleyes: rant over...:)

UglyTruckling
03-15-2006, 11:52 AM
Glad to hear all sides of it. We specifically chose a stove with a good EPA rating, so as to minimize as much as possible the amount of stuff spewed.

ridgeln
03-15-2006, 12:02 PM
Another Option:

Corn Stove.

Sounds goofy, I know - but if you are in an area that has a lot of field corn, you can heat your house (barn, cabin, etc) using approx 2 bushels a day. I can get a bushel of corn delivered for about $2/b - so for $4 can keep the house toasty! Ok - so i don't actually heat my house this way, but have a neighbor trying to convince me to buy one for my barn (probably next year - heating season is almost over).

Low ash, clean burn, little to no smoke. Biofuel.

There are a number of companies that make them and you can get them in all sizes.

I've got a friend who'se been heating his house w/ a corn stove for 10+ years - neither he nor his wife have any sinus problems. Nor does their 4 y.o. son have sinus or asthma.

-ridgeln

Ahab
03-15-2006, 12:56 PM
We have a Napoleon with low EPA emissions. Burn mesquite and oak. Up here the humidity is naturally low but we always have a large cast iron teapot on the stove filled with water. It lasts about two days. No problems.:)

Kellcut
03-15-2006, 02:58 PM
A good friend of ours parents heat their house with corn. They love it.



Another Option:

Corn Stove.

Sounds goofy, I know - but if you are in an area that has a lot of field corn, you can heat your house (barn, cabin, etc) using approx 2 bushels a day. I can get a bushel of corn delivered for about $2/b - so for $4 can keep the house toasty! Ok - so i don't actually heat my house this way, but have a neighbor trying to convince me to buy one for my barn (probably next year - heating season is almost over).

Low ash, clean burn, little to no smoke. Biofuel.

There are a number of companies that make them and you can get them in all sizes.

I've got a friend who'se been heating his house w/ a corn stove for 10+ years - neither he nor his wife have any sinus problems. Nor does their 4 y.o. son have sinus or asthma.

-ridgeln