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Hi All - I was advised to replace all 4 tires, even though my rear tires still have considerable tread on them. I was told that if I don't replace all 4 tires that I could blow my transfer case that enables 4 wheel drive. This seems like complete crap and I should be able to replace only the front tires without any consequences.

Are there any Honda techs that can comment on this?

Thanks - Dan
 

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I am no Honda tech, but I would find it hard to believe that could happen. I always rotate my tires every 5-10,000 miles so I have never had that problem, I always do 4 at once. The only thing I am aware of, is if you do only purchase 2, it is better to get the same exact tire as the other 2 on there to avoid any ride comfort problems.
 

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With an AWD vehicle you are "supposed" to replace all 4 at once or if that's not possible, get a replacement (in the example of a blowout) that is as close to the size of the others as possible (tread depth).

Reason being you can mess up your drive system with different sized tires. Without going too much into it all, lets say you have a tire that's brand new tread on the rear right and you have a newerish tire on the back left but it's 7/32nds treadwear. When the rear locks up, you have the old tires now turning faster than the new tires (newer tire has a larger diameter).

Possibly even the TPMS since you'd technically have one tire spinning faster than the others, so it may indicate a different tire pressure then there actually is.

I believe it could also be bad for your antilock brake system but that would hold true for any vehicle.

In reality, some people just can't afford to replace all four tires. If I was in a pinch, and could only get two, I'd put the best used ones in the back and the two new ones in the front.
 

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Best tires should go in the rear of any vehicle, assuming you're not running a staggered setup that makes that impossible.

You won't blow your transfer case if you run newer tires on one end of the vehicle. At least get the same model and size tire though. Mismatched tires aren't dangerous, but a matching set will help the truck handle its best.

Source: not a Honda tech.
 

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replaced 2 tires at a time on the RL the whole time I drove it. Those OEM tires really lighten the wallet - but are well worth it. - Havent been convinced there is a better tire for the RL than the one it rolled out of the factory on.

Fresh rubber always went on the rear. Havent had any drivetrain issues through 380,000 miles.

RL is pretty much retired now(drove it maybe a month ago), sitting in the prime spot in the garage - it earned that right.
 

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Anyone ever take a look at what Honda put in the trunk as a spare tire.I think it is smaller then the four that it is made to replace if you get a flat.I had to drive 2 hrs on it once to get to a Michelin dealer.
 

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Honda is pretty quiet about the allowable tire diameter difference the system is designed to accommodate. I had a non-repairable flat on one side at around 37k miles a few years ago and elected (ouch) to replace all 4 tires due to the wear differences with new on the rear and half worn tires on the front.

You certainly don't want the VSA system activating due to tire size differences. Surely there is a design tolerance, but whatever that factor is remains a mystery.

Here's a page from the 2008 OM which supports the info Bogus919 posted upthread.
 

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I realize the idea of putting the fresh tires up front isn't a popular one but if I could explain my rational. Most of the weight and power of the truck is in the front. This isnt' a rear wheel driven truck or even an AWD truck that is mostly powered from the rear.... think of the system as a FWD which gets a little help from the rear wheels. You can lock it up with VTM and get more power and traction to the rear but agian, this is pretty much a FWD truck in most cases.

So by putting the two fresh tires up front, you can wear them out a little before your next rotation, maybe get them a bit closer to the older tires that you left on the truck.

Again, that's what I was thinking.
 

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The issue stems from which tires lose traction and whether you can recover from it. A skid in the front is much easier to correct than the rear, regardless of whether the car is front, rear, or all wheel drive. This video illustrates it pretty well, though there are plenty of others:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oa9hzcjdi5Q
 

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I realize the idea of putting the fresh tires up front isn't a popular one but if I could explain my rational. Most of the weight and power of the truck is in the front. This isnt' a rear wheel driven truck or even an AWD truck that is mostly powered from the rear.... think of the system as a FWD which gets a little help from the rear wheels. You can lock it up with VTM and get more power and traction to the rear but agian, this is pretty much a FWD truck in most cases.

So by putting the two fresh tires up front, you can wear them out a little before your next rotation, maybe get them a bit closer to the older tires that you left on the truck.

Again, that's what I was thinking.
Honda does not specify what axle but you should always have the same tires on each axle. I do note that most if not all tire places recommend new rubber at the rear.
I would think if the old ones are more than 1/3 worn the difference in getting them closer will be too small to matter.
 

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The best thing to do is avoid this debate entirely - rotate your tires so all 4 wear out at the same time.

Cheaping out on tires by delaying replacement is just silly. Driving is the most dangerous thing you do each day, and tires the second most important safety feature (after your brain).

F
 

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The best thing to do is avoid this debate entirely - rotate your tires so all 4 wear out at the same time.

Cheaping out on tires by delaying replacement is just silly. Driving is the most dangerous thing you do each day, and tires the second most important safety feature (after your brain).

F
Point taken!

If you have quality tires to start with and rotate them regularly you could still get stuck with the dilemma of having to scrap a damaged tire. I thought that is what this thread is about but apparently not by the OP. It is still something to consider if you do end up with just one bad tire.
 

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The issue stems from which tires lose traction and whether you can recover from it. A skid in the front is much easier to correct than the rear, regardless of whether the car is front, rear, or all wheel drive. This video illustrates it pretty well, though there are plenty of others:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oa9hzcjdi5Q
Nice in theory.... But do I never rotate my tires again.?.? I'm with Bogus919. Put the new tires upfront and let them wear naturally to match the rear tires. Just a real world thought...
 

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Nice in theory.... But do I never rotate my tires again.?.? I'm with Bogus919. Put the new tires upfront and let them wear naturally to match the rear tires. Just a real world thought...
Tire rotation is to ensure that the tires wear evenly enough that you replace all 4 of them at once. I always prefer to replace tires in sets of four, but if you've worn only a pair down and don't want to replace all four, stop rotating the tires. Best tire still goes in the rear.
 

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For safety, best tires in the rear.

For even wear, best tires in front until the wear is even.
 
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