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2017 RTL
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Silkiechicken and I measured her runout, and it was within normal specs, at least on the outside. Even though it measured fine, we decided to try having the stock rotors resurfaced since it was the most economical option, and we prefer to use oem parts over aftermarket. Having the rotors resurfaced fixed our vibration when braking, and 20,000 miles later, the pulsation has not returned (we also have always double-checked lug nut torque whenever someone touches them).

I'd recommend you try resurfacing, especially if you can remove your rotors yourself. If you have to take it to a mechanic, the economics might not be as straightforward. We ended up removing our rotors and taking them to an auto parts store that charged about $22/rotor. This was in the greater Seattle area.
 

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Caution on the truing of rotors. One thing i learned in my auto class years ago was you only cut off as much surface as needed. The problem is shops will usually cut off a lot more and that compromises the rotors a lot of times. They do that cause it's faster for them. Taking a little off at a time keeps the integrity of the steel better too.
 

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I had a "pulsing" of the brakes on my 2012 Miata and the dealer wanted to change out the rotors at about 20k miles. I said no thank you and went through the new brake bedding procedure that took care of the pulsing. Your experience may vary of course.
 

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2019 Sport Lunar Silver
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Caution on the truing of rotors. One thing i learned in my auto class years ago was you only cut off as much surface as needed. The problem is shops will usually cut off a lot more and that compromises the rotors a lot of times. They do that cause it's faster for them. Taking a little off at a time keeps the integrity of the steel better too.
I've usually been able to do rotors myself. I learned quickly that taking too much off in one pass will wear out the bits, give a poor finish, & take longer to do. So it's doubtful a shop would take too much off.
Honda has always recommended using an on car lathe (it bolts to where the calipers are bolted). HOWEVER most of the time, taking them off & having it done turns out okay.
 

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I've usually been able to do rotors myself. I learned quickly that taking too much off in one pass will wear out the bits, give a poor finish, & take longer to do. So it's doubtful a shop would take too much off.
Honda has always recommended using an on car lathe (it bolts to where the calipers are bolted). HOWEVER most of the time, taking them off & having it done turns out okay.
It makes sense that Honda would recommend turning rotors on the car. You'd be able to compensate for small deviations from ideal. However, new rotors aren't turned on your car prior to use. So in general, I agree with you. Best on car, but should be fine off the car as well. Just make sure your mating surfaces clean and free of debris or rust!
 

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Thank you for everyone's input! I'm leaning towards replacement of the front rotors (at minimum) and possibly front pads too. My experience is that pulsations become increasing worse as the brakes get hotter and hotter during a long descent (could be at highway speeds and at <45 mph speeds). Not much of an issue if I need to slow down at highway speeds one time on level ground. This tells me that extreme high temperatures are causing the rotors to be out of true, perhaps due to an irregular casting or non-uninform metal compound where expansion is not even. Both reasons are not likely, but I think turning the rotors won't help if the rotors are inherently "defective".

Options are to replace with OEM like @silkiechicken, or replace with aftermarket like @smufguy has proposed on other threads. To be honest, I'm not looking for ultra super stopping performance since I don't have a problem on a daily basis. It's those long winding descents where I'm carrying hundreds of pounds of gear in the truck bed and/or towing a 2000-5000 pound trailer that I want the confidence of being able to slow down/stop without vibrations and brake fade.

@smufguy, you've recommended StopTech 126.40092 SL/SR rotors with PowerStop Z36-1723 pads for the fronts. Open to anyone's thoughts/recommendations. I'm not looking to go as far as replacing the calipers with 2007-2013 MDX.
 

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@smufguy, you've recommended StopTech 126.40092 SL/SR rotors with PowerStop Z36-1723 pads for the fronts. Open to anyone's thoughts/recommendations. I'm not looking to go as far as replacing the calipers with 2007-2013 MDX.

If you are not planning on swapping out the calipers, then you need
StopTech 126.40069SL/SR. These are the Slotted Sport disks. This is your replacement for the Ridgeline. approx $105/rotor
PowerStop Z36-1723 pads. These e are OEM size pads. - approx $40 for the front.

All in all, you are looking at about $250 with taxes.

Edit: Previous PowerStop was a Kit that included rotors.
 

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If you are not planning on swapping out the calipers, then you need
StopTech 126.40069SL/SR. These are the Slotted Sport disks. This is your replacement for the Ridgeline. approx $105/rotor
PowerStop Z36 - K2429-36 pads. These e are OEM size pads. - approx $206 for the front.

All in all, you are looking at about mid $400s with taxes.
Those PowerStop front pads seem overly pricey.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
@MechE

I'm at ~96k now and the $44 was well spent to resurface the front rotors. No braking vibrations to be had since that was done. Might be worth a shot before forking out the $400+ for new brakes and rotors. I actually did fork out the $$ and still have the brand new OEM rotors and pads sitting in my closet as backup if the resurfacing didn't work.
 

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Those PowerStop front pads seem overly pricey.
Thanks for catching that. Looks like I was looking at the Kit, thus the prefix 'K'. which includes rotors and pads. The G2 pads are Z36-1723 and are around $40.
 

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Thank you for everyone's input! I'm leaning towards replacement of the front rotors (at minimum) and possibly front pads too. My experience is that pulsations become increasing worse as the brakes get hotter and hotter during a long descent (could be at highway speeds and at <45 mph speeds). Not much of an issue if I need to slow down at highway speeds one time on level ground. This tells me that extreme high temperatures are causing the rotors to be out of true, perhaps due to an irregular casting or non-uninform metal compound where expansion is not even. Both reasons are not likely, but I think turning the rotors won't help if the rotors are inherently "defective".

Options are to replace with OEM like @silkiechicken, or replace with aftermarket like @smufguy has proposed on other threads. To be honest, I'm not looking for ultra super stopping performance since I don't have a problem on a daily basis. It's those long winding descents where I'm carrying hundreds of pounds of gear in the truck bed and/or towing a 2000-5000 pound trailer that I want the confidence of being able to slow down/stop without vibrations and brake fade.

@smufguy, you've recommended StopTech 126.40092 SL/SR rotors with PowerStop Z36-1723 pads for the fronts. Open to anyone's thoughts/recommendations. I'm not looking to go as far as replacing the calipers with 2007-2013 MDX.
By your description of how the vehicle will be used, I'm not optimistic you'll have what you want. Hope I'm wrong, but I've never been impressed with Hondas' brakes. I'm thinking larger diameter rotors for a start.
 

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Go with EBC's dimpled / slotted rotors and a set of their Yellowstuff pads and I doubt he will "want" for more. Only problem is brake dust. . .
 
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