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Discussion Starter #1
I've been reading a few articles and one You Tuber that I follow and there was talk about the iVTM-4 overheating. I'm probably guessing clutch packs maybe on the ones that did?
Here's a link of a You Tuber I follow who does test on vehicles. He does Diagonal test just to see how AWD 4WD systems react https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JRgsIIkejOo&list=PLAHnyv3_yWFaUaASTqn83FfS_J43ia10O&index=1&spfreload=10

In one of his videos in the comments he mentoined in a sand testing the only problem we had in the sand... the trans was not going back to 1st and sending full power to the wheels. So it was able to do the hill barely.

Are there any known issues being reported?
 

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Below is actually what was said in his comments. Nothing was wrong with the transmission. He would have probably did better in D or D4.

Also when going up our big sand hill, we could not get the transmission to give us full power in first gear so we ran out of power at the end of it.
 

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His statement is a bit vague. Why couldn't it deliver full power? Possibly because it kept upshifting to 2nd too early? I have a 2015 Accord, which has the same trans, and on the Accord sister forum, they are constantly grousing about how the trans upshifts from 1st to 2nd way too early, not letting one take full advantage of 1st gear. Perhaps this was the issue? Dunno... :confused:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Below is actually what was said in his comments. Nothing was wrong with the transmission. He would have probably did better in D or D4.
I was quoting his last comment in the comment section he made below the video.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Below is actually what was said in his comments. Nothing was wrong with the transmission. He would have probably did better in D or D4.
I know sand can have it's challenges depending on type and moisture content and tire pressure. I haven't found a video yet where it shows what the sand mode can actually do.
 

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...In one of his videos in the comments he mentoined in a sand testing the only problem we had in the sand... the trans was not going back to 1st and sending full power to the wheels. So it was able to do the hill barely….
Was he in Sand Mode?
 

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The transmission overheating stems from the TFL Truck guys doing their offroad comparison of mid sized trucks. They were slowly crawling up a big hill and over large rocks. This is basically a worst case scenario for an AWD transmission. Slow speed, so there is limited air flow for cooling, and constant slipping because they were crawling over rocks.

I haven't seen any other complaints of over heating.
 

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I do believe the D4 lock changes the shift points of the transmission to hold those first gears longer. I could be totally wrong but acceleration seems way more potent when locking it in to D4.
 

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Clarification question: Are we talking about the transmission or the i-VTM4?
 

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I doubt the TFL guys had the truck in "L" or in any of the modes available - those guys tend to struggle with the off road tech in vehicles, IMO.

But also, off road is basically the one thing the RL just isn't really designed to do. That should be obvious just by looking at it, and that's ok! It's good or great at a ton of other things.
 

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I doubt the TFL guys had the truck in "L" or in any of the modes available - those guys tend to struggle with the off road tech in vehicles, IMO.

But also, off road is basically the one thing the RL just isn't really designed to do. That should be obvious just by looking at it, and that's ok! It's good or great at a ton of other things.
Agreed - I didn't buy it for off-roading. I had a Toyota 4Runner before and didn't take that off-roading either! I think the truck hits the exact demographic that Honda has targeted - those of us who are on the road 90% of the time, that may take the vehicle in sand, snow and muddy backroads (maybe) who want a good ride, good handling, a sophisticated AWD system along with the ability to haul 5000 lbs. Perfect for what I need and expect.
 

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Agreed - I didn't buy it for off-roading. I had a Toyota 4Runner before and didn't take that off-roading either! I think the truck hits the exact demographic that Honda has targeted - those of us who are on the road 90% of the time, that may take the vehicle in sand, snow and muddy backroads (maybe) who want a good ride, good handling, a sophisticated AWD system along with the ability to haul 5000 lbs. Perfect for what I need and expect.
My thoughts exactly. It's going to be a great all weather vehicle that has approximately the same size box as a F150 Screw with a 5.5 box. Mind you the box height is not the same but for my needs I can make it work. I don't tow but in the future I will have a covered cargo trailer for short hauls. Ive owned many F150s and when I think back how many times I've been off road it's not very many. Now years ago you would try to find where you could go and couldn't go with a 4X4. Buying a Ridgeline isn't for that reason anymore :smile: 99% of my driving is on road while still being able to use truck functions that suit my needs.

I knew that I read somewhere before that they talked about Heat issues with SH-AWD/iVTM4
Acura SH-AWD: A Comprehensive Analysis (Updated Jan.8, 2016) - YouWheel.com - Car News and Review
 

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OK, I found that video, and it is the transmission that overheated, not the i-VTM4. He had a message in the dash display that said "Transmission is too hot!". If the i-VTM4 system overheats, the AWD idiot light blinks instead. So why would the transmission overheat? Something blocking the cooler? Inoperative electric fan? I've never heard of a transmission overheating except when there was a malfunction of some sort.

EDIT: Here is the video. The overheating issue starts at 15:00.

https://www.youtube.com/embed/B5eE697aqEg
 

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Discussion Starter #15
OK, I found that video, and it is the transmission that overheated, not the i-VTM4. He had a message in the dash display that said "Transmission is too hot!". If the i-VTM4 system overheats, the AWD idiot light blinks instead. So why would the transmission overheat? Something blocking the cooler? Inoperative electric fan? I've never heard of a transmission overheating except when there was a malfunction of some sort.

EDIT: Here is the video. The overheating issue starts at 15:00.

https://www.youtube.com/embed/B5eE697aqEg
Yes that's one of the videos I watched. Not sure what the cause was.
 

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Yes that's one of the videos I watched. Not sure what the cause was.
Please read my earlier post:

The transmission overheating stems from the TFL Truck guys doing their offroad comparison of mid sized trucks. They were slowly crawling up a big hill and over large rocks. This is basically a worst case scenario for an AWD transmission. Slow speed, so there is limited air flow for cooling, and constant slipping because they were crawling over rocks.

I haven't seen any other complaints of over heating.
 

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Probably not a good idea to go rock crawling without a low range anyway. A little disappointing that the RL's cooling couldn't handle this but then again, that's not what the RL is about. Off road and ground clearance are probably it's weakest attributes but Honda has this truck dialed in for it's target buyer.
 

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Hey guys,
I got the "awd to hot" light this weekend. I was out with some friends and got the idea to go out into a corn field with maybe 6-8 inches of snow in it. I ended up finding a snow drift and getting stuck. The light came probably 30 seconds into me trying to back out of the drift. Now I know I had been driving around in this field for a few minutes before I got stuck. But I still couldn't believe it came on so quick considering it was negative 4 degrees outside. I'm not 100% sure where the cooler is located but even after letting the truck set for 5 plus minutes while we where digging out around it, the popped back on just seconds into spinning the tires. I tired snow/stuck vehicle and sand modes to get out but neither worked. That's when my friends chimed in that the rear tires were not spinning. I still can't figure out why that was. We ended up calling a buddy and he pulled the truck about a foot with his impreza and the rear tires on my truck started spinning and I backed right out. It was a wildly disappointing experience. I wish vtm-4 lock was still a thing because I don't think I would have gotten stuck had I been able lock the truck into awd. I'm coming off owning 5 Subaru vehicles and at least in those you know what the system is going to do.
 

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So why would the transmission overheat? Something blocking the cooler? Inoperative electric fan? I've never heard of a transmission overheating except when there was a malfunction of some sort.
New here, coming from Jeeps (currently own a 2005 Rubicon) and registered finally because I can contribute!

Automatic transmissions overheating is actually pretty common in 2007+ Wranglers (not sure when or if they ever "fixed" it). Many Wranglers have burned down from it and there was a recall to address it. The problem in the Wrangler offroad is that people would not put the transfer case into four low for whatever reason, forcing the engine and the transmission to work harder. The fires were caused because people would boil their transmission fluid without realizing it. That boiling fluid would come out the only place it can, the dipstick, and drip onto an exhaust manifold creating a fire. In the initial recall for it I believe jeep placed a splash shield to prevent the boiling fluid from landing directly on the exhaust manifold. In later years they added a transmission temperature warning message (been on a couple of Jeep trips when people had that come up) and I believe they increased the size of the transmission cooler. Typically people had these issues while off road in four high, or while towing, because those activities cause a lot of heat in a transmission. To prevent that you want to be in a lower gear.

Bringing this all back to the Ridgeline and the TFL video of the overheat, my bet is that at low speeds, like an offroad crawl speed, first gear is not low enough to prevent constant slipping in the transmission. Add in our Colorado air density and the power needed to climb hills/rocks slowly, the Ridgeline's transmission doesn't stand a chance because it's not what the vehicle was engineered for. A larger transmission cooler would help, but really if you want to go off the road the Ridgeline needs a much lower gear to reduce the stress being put on the transmission. It's not a knock against the Ridgeline. Jeep is engineered from the ground up for to go offroad and even they got it wrong on their halo vehicle (well, I actually blame the users but we don't need to get into a personal responsibility discussion). It is not fair to expect Honda to have engineered the vehicle for offroading when the overwhelming majority will rarely leave the pavement, let alone try to climb a Jeep trail. I give credit to Honda for having the forethought of placing a transmission overheat warning in the system, it is better than what Jeep started with.
 

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I ended up finding a snow drift and getting stuck. The light came probably 30 seconds into me trying to back out of the drift.
My very first guess on this, and just a guess I really can't find much about how the AWD system is cooled, is that in the drift the snow packed in someplace blocking airflow around the heat exchanger for the AWD system. If that's actually up front with the radiators or if it relies on air movement under the vehicle, I don't know. But if you nose any vehicle into a snowbank well enough that it blocks airflow through the grill area, the engine and transmissions will begin to overheat very quickly, as in 30 seconds or so would not be surprising at all. Depending on where the heat exchanger is for the AWD system and exactly how the snow was packed around that, I would not be surprised that it would overheat that quickly. To prevent damage the system probably disengaged the AWD which is why the rear tires weren't turning. As soon as you get some air moving around the heat exchanger again, it'd cool down just as quickly and start working again. But without air movement, like when you're out trying to dig it out, it'll just sit there and bake in its own heat taking a very long time to cool.
 
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