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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Based on the Pilot release, looks like the new Ridgeline will have wheels compatible with Gen1... was getting interested as we need to buy new snows for the RL and did not want to get only 1 winter out of them, but looks like current wheels and snows might transfer to new RL, or at least to an RL speced with 18s. Anyone else reading it this way?

New Pilot has same tire spec as current RL, and although there is a 20" wheel option, we would look for the 18s... of course have to wait for bolt-pattern and offset, but no reason to suspect a change of bolt pattern and early prognosis is good.
 

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That's interesting. I have not dug into the new Pilot's tire specs, but if the 18" wheels take the same size tire as current RL, there's a good chance your snows would work on the next gen RL...as long as Honda doesn't bump the RL up to a taller 18" tire for a bit more ground clearance. Regarding the RL wheels, bolt pattern and offset could be issues, but don't forget about disc brake clearances which can also vary. (Of course, I would think the ROC would be a good place to find a buyer for used wheels and tires for Gen1 RLs.)

Over on the other thread, there was some carping about the new RL not getting 20" wheels on higher trim models. I never saw where they got that info, but if it's true, I'm fine with it and you'd benefit too. Otherwise, you might find yourself wanting options on your next gen RL that were only offered with 20" wheels.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the cross-section of thoughts. I cannot imagine living with the cost of 20" wheels/tires, so hoping they do stick to the 18s... With the platform sharing with the Pilot and Ody, do not expect to have any issues with swapping wheels between them, even if the RL asks for taller sidewalls and probably +10 width.

I used RL 17s as an upsize for 06 Ody 16s, then as a downsize from the 11 Ody 18s for snow use. On the 11 Ody, needed RL lugs.

Good news is by the time anyone needs snows, the picture should be clearer... snow tires that bridge generations is a pretty big costs savings, wheels even more so... and can't say I ever gained a $$ on the sale of a used vehicle by throwing in the snows.
 

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10-4 on all that. I was also thinking that many Gen1 RL owners may have spare tires and wheels. If Honda used the same wheel/tire specs on the next gen, that could be additional enticement for some Gen1 owners to trade up for the new RL. I've bought Subarus for years and have never been able to swap spare rims or tires after model redesigns -- always a bummer.
 

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Mercedes put 20's on their sport utes and Michelin only makes one tire that fits it and it's a summer tire for most. They must know something.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Just bought new snows for the RL1 that should translate to the RL2 as a winter downsize (based on the Pilot). Bridgestones in 245/65R-17, mounted on a second set of RTX gray 17s I used to use on my Ody. Offset ranges look the same as well 39-48mm (RL1 to Pilot). Pretty big investment so glad they line up.
 

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Keep in mind that no matter what wheel sizes are offered, the tire diameters (height) will be the same - you'll just have less sidewall for a harsher ride on the larger wheels.
 

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Keep in mind that no matter what wheel sizes are offered, the tire diameters (height) will be the same - you'll just have less sidewall for a harsher ride on the larger wheels.
Larger wheels are supposed to have less rolling resistance. That, plus their popularity with our current pop culture, is likely why Honda specified them for the Pilot, dragging the Ridgeline crowd kicking and screaming with it.. The tall wheels may have bling, but they lack functionality in the real world. I'd rather have the comfort, off-roadability, cost-effective-ness, and curb protection offered by short wheels and tall sidewalls.

Yep, your 20" wheels will net you 0.01 more MPG! Just don't kiss the curb or you're out $800.
 

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Larger wheels are supposed to have less rolling resistance. That, plus their popularity with our current pop culture, is likely why Honda specified them for the Pilot, dragging the Ridgeline crowd kicking and screaming with it.. The tall wheels may have bling, but they lack functionality in the real world. I'd rather have the comfort, off-roadability, cost-effective-ness, and curb protection offered by short wheels and tall sidewalls.

Yep, your 20" wheels will net you 0.01 more MPG! Just don't kiss the curb or you're out $800.
Small, skinny tires provide the least rolling resistance, but also the least traction because of the small contact patch.

Large, wide tires increase rolling resistance, but have a larger contact patch for better traction and handling.

The size of the wheel is more cosmetic than functional. Black rubber doesn't have much going for it in terms of looks. That's why we've used fender skirts, white walls, and raised white letters to hide it or dress it up in the past. Since tire sizes don't need to increase for efficiency reasons, manufacturers now offer larger wheels while keeping the tire diameter the same - this reduces the amount of "ugly" rubber that is seen. The trade off is that with less sidewall, the tires become noisier and rougher and more prone to damage from potholes.

Edit: Here is a little article article by Click and Clack that has [mostly] useful information (some of it is questionable) about "small" vs. "large" "tires".
 

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The hyper - miler forums tend to lean toward larger wheels having lower rolling resistance, with some studies to support it, but I don't currently have any links. There were also several anecdotal argument ts against it, but as far as the research went, bigger was better for efficiency. With that being said, I am all for taller sidewalls, regardless of wheel size. I prefer function over bling.
 

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The hyper - miler forums tend to lean toward larger wheels having lower rolling resistance, with some studies to support it, but I don't currently have any links. There were also several anecdotal argument ts against it, but as far as the research went, bigger was better for efficiency. With that being said, I am all for taller sidewalls, regardless of wheel size. I prefer function over bling.
If larger tires improved efficiency, the Toyota Prius and other high-efficiency vehicles would come from the factory with wagon wheels instead of the "spare tires" they are typically equipped with. :)
 

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Ok, did a little reading....overall diameter has little effect on rolling resistance (varies by study)...taller sidewalls have more flex and more rolling resistance than short sidewalls...wider tires have LESS rolling resistance than skinny tires (although skinny tires may have less wind resistance (or possibly more, if they don't fill the wheel well sufficiently))...agressive tread has more rolling resistance (mudders=bad, bald=good).
 

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Oh, and higher air pressure is generally better, but too much can be detrimental, as it makes the tire skip, deflect, lose traction, etc. TPMS doesn't let us alter it much anyway in modern vehicles. :(
 

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I didn't read the entire thread, but the next-generation Ridgeline will have the same bolt pattern as the first generation, but the stud size is different.
 

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I didn't read the entire thread, but the next-generation Ridgeline will have the same bolt pattern as the first generation, but the stud size is different.
From someone who's changed studs before, I wonder if the G1 studs will fit in place of the G2 studs? That would allow for more wheel options, assuming the wheel offsets are similar.
 

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If larger tires improved efficiency, the Toyota Prius and other high-efficiency vehicles would come from the factory with wagon wheels instead of the "spare tires" they are typically equipped with. :)
He said "wheels", not "tires." And yes the large wheel with a rubber band sized tire offers the potential for less rolling resistance compared to a tire with a similar tread pattern with a taller sidewall.

On the GenII Ridge, if they don't actually increase the tire diameter from the Pilot's spec (I believe the 16 Pilots with 18" wheels use the same tire size as the Ridge's with 18" wheels?) the 20" rims will have a very short sidewall and will easily be subject to damage from curbs and potholes.

People talk about a "city" truck like it would be an easy life for that vehicle. In the city I live near (DC) roads are atrocious with potholes that will suck down a honda civic. This is especially true after winters with heavy plowing. There is no way a 20" wheel / tire combo with the current ridge's tire diameter would survive for long in the road conditions that I drive on.

If for some reason I bought GenII Ridge that came with 20" wheels, I would have the dealer (or find someone on this forum) swap to the 18" size.
 

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Bridgestone is a proponent of the "large and narrow" tire.
http://www.bridgestone.com/corporate/news/2013030502.html

They are supplying such a tire for the BMW i3:
"...The Ecopia EP500 ologic was launched in November 2013, with BMW i3. It comes in four size choices including 155/70 R19 84Q and 175/55 R20 85Q, and in two variants for winter. The Blizzak NV ologic winter variant is built from Bridgestone’s Multicell compound that rapidly clears water between the snowy surface and tyre. It hence improves road contact and grip…"

http://www.tyreblog.co.uk/2014/bridgestones-innovative-large-narrow-ep500-tyre-fits-bmw-i3-1793

More about skinny, tall tires:
http://www.moderntiredealer.com/channel/retailing/article/story/2013/08/the-skinny-on-tall-thin-tires.aspx

"...Are tall, thin tires going to be the next big trend in the tire industry?

That’s what we asked the five largest tire manufacturers in the world: Bridgestone Corp., Continental AG, Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., Groupe Michelin and Pirelli & Cie SpA.

Some were forthcoming with details and information; others, not so much…"
 

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Oh, and higher air pressure is generally better, but too much can be detrimental, as it makes the tire skip, deflect, lose traction, etc. TPMS doesn't let us alter it much anyway in modern vehicles. :(
Really? Are there TPMS systems that don't let you increase pressure?
 

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The argument on skinny tires is generally that they have less wind resistance, and this seems to play out at speeds above 50mph, or so. The counter-argument is if you have large wheel wells, then you get more drag on the vehicle because the tire isn't filling the well and displacing that air pocket. It probably varies quote a bit from vehicle to vehicle.

One thing is for sure...skinny tires give better traction in adverse conditions, worse traction in ideal conditions.
 
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