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Discussion Starter #1
Two issues I'm having and one is almost a deal breaker to the point of trading out. Sounds dramatic, but I'm at my limit with it.

Qualifier: I only use brushless, contact-free car washes and only get the Express wash, so no Rainx or other coatings. That's not to say some of those systems don't get wax on your glass at times, but as a rule I don't request it.

- first off, I notice horizontal, razor like, scratches in the glass. You can't feel any of them and they're almost cobweb like. I haven't put much time into these, so maybe it's rare, but I need to look closer. Just curious if anyone else noticed something like this.

- Now the worse problem. In all my years of driving, and in the 2017 Explorer I had as well, I never really thought much about defrosters. The window fogs, you hit the defroster, window clears in seconds, done deal. And that's on the fairly rare occasion that I would need a defroster. In the RL, the windshield can't seem to stand any real variance between cabin and ambient temperature, then fogs or worse, condensates. I know humidity has been high this year, but WTH. It's too the point where it's dangerous to drive.

The window fogs, I hit the defroster, but the if temperature isn't set correctly, the window not only doesn't clear, it gets worse. of course, it seems to happen when I'm on a dark road, with the family, sometimes in the rain, and it's down right dangerous. We went on a family trip to Deep Creek, MD. almost 5 hours each way and it was great trip. However, during the vacation, using side roads in VERY lite rain, there were times when I could hardly see. My guess is that my A/C is on lowest, so when I hit the defroster I then have coldest air, hitting the warm windshield. Which begs the question, when was the last time I needed a defroster in the summer!!

Not only doesn't not clear, unless I fiddle with the temperature, the condensation forms in shapes on the outside of the windshield. At first, I thought it was dirt grabbing the condensation, but I'm not sure what the heck is going on.

My 73 Duster did a better job of clearing the windshield. Is there something with the type of glass? If so, why didn't my 17' Explorer have this issue.

Any help is appreciated.
 

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I don't have horizontal lines on my windshield and I don't have any trouble with defrosting.

Thoughts about defrosting:

1. You sure you have the air recirculation open? I believe it opens on its own after certain amount of time so probably you do.

2. Air-conditioning is part of defrosting in certain conditions. You can either go hot or you can go cold.

3. Have you ever had a leak in your Ridgeline? Have you left the window open in a rain storm? If you've ever had a puddle somewhere in your vehicle, especially if it's soaked into a carpet, that can cause the symptoms you're describing under certain weather conditions, like high humidity.

I wish I had an answer for you. Maybe someone else will.
 

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I realize you've tried to ensure your windshield is truly 'clean', but just for your consideration (IMO it can't hurt to try):

Using a clay-bar is perfectly safe and will clean your windshield of built-up 'stuff', including hard-water spots or haze, better than any cleaner/wash/detergent, just as it does on painted surfaces.

Use it exactly as recommended for painted surfaces, including use of the recommended detailing fluid for lubrication. Do NOT substitute water, soapy water, or anything else for the proper clay bar lubrication fluid - any other lubricating fluid risks causing the clay bar to disintegrate and make a huge mess.

There are clay bars marketed for glass, but any clay bar that's safe for paint is also safe for glass.

After 'claying' with the proper lube fluid, THEN clean with windshield with soapy water followed by glass cleaner to remove the residual lube fluid and any small bits of clay retained in windshield scratches or pits.

Works great for all windows, inside and outside surface, but do NOT use a clay bar on any surface-applied window tint film.
___
It's weird how glass can accumulate a 'film' (offgassing from new plastics?) that's invisible most of the time but seems to really aggravate 'fogging' - claying the glass will assuredly cut through and remove that film (though it mat re-accumulate over time).

Maybe it'd help your situation, I'm confident it can't hurt - I 'clay' my glass (and paint) ~annually for a 'like new clean'.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks guys. To be honest, cleaning the windshield is another sore spot. I clean it with Windex and paper towels. It always seems to streak or shadow in areas. That happened a bit with the Ford, but nothing I couldn't live with and small areas. With the RL it's bad enough, i had to changes things up a bit. So, I switched to glass cleaner and newspaper. In my teens, I was a theater usher and took my glass door serious. There's something about the ink on a newspaper that prevents streaking. That helped a great deal and I'm not being very picky.

Nope, no leaks and never any water inside the truck. The condensation is on the outside of the windshield.

Yep, the fact is, I almost always have the fresh air vent open.

Next time the windshield does it, I'll try to get a picture. At times, it looks like it just rained. Use the wipers and for a second it's gone, then reappears. It won't clear, until i get the temp just right, then voila, it's gone. I can't help but feel it's something to do with the newer "safety" glass I think they call it. I really expected others to pile on about similar issues.

I'll try cleaning it, then wait for the next rain. The fact that it clears fine, then reappears is what's odd and also what makes it so dangerous in the rain. When my wife's Pilot was new, we had to clean the heck out of the windshield because of a coating that came on it and the terrible prep job the dealer did on it. At first, i thought mine was the same, but that was 7,000 miles ago!
 

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I clean it with Windex and paper towels. It always seems to streak or shadow in areas.
Windex leaves a residue and paper towels can scratch glass. Try using Invisible Glass with cotton towels. After drying with a clean cotton towel, clean again with a dry microfiber cloth.
 

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The only times I’ve had excessive fogging on the inside of a windshield is when they have a coating on them. The off gassing from new car interiors will coat the windshields repeatedly and need to be cleaned regularly. The best cleaner I’ve used is “invisible glass”. ( I’ve not tried claybarring a window). If the defrost is set too low, it will cause condensation on the outside of the windshield because it cools the windshield which causes the condensation. Increasing the temperature slightly warms the windshield eliminating the condensation on the outside.
 

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On the windshield, if you get the glass colder than the dew point, you'll get condensation. On those summer rainy nights, the dew point can be pretty high (relatively speaking), so it can be hard to manage. If the glass is thinner (seems to be a thing these days) maybe it cools faster than your previous windshield so seems more noticeable.

Sent from my SM-T813 using Tapatalk
 

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I do think that the best place to start here is to really clean the windshield both inside and out. I personally have had very little success with removing the haze from the inside of the glass (only is visible during certain conditions) using all sorts of glass cleaners and a whole bunch of elbow grease and time. Invisible glass, Windex, newspaper, cotton and or microfiber towels . . .and lots of effort. . . yet nothing seems to really work. . .Centex's suggestion of the Claybar is what I will try next.

Once the underlying haze / contamination issue is solved it should be more obvious if there is a real problem with the OP's climate control system or it's simply as good as it gets for the GenII. Could be subtle wetness inside the truck (small water leaks or leaking heater core), could be malfunctioning air flow control etc.

Get the glass clean first.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks guys. Years ago, I was a mechanic, so I know how a leak or moisture inside the vehicle would reveal itself. This is not that.

I actually did clean that glass with glass cleaner, inside and out, then wiped it with a microfiber cloth, before leaving for Deep Creek, so other than 5 hours of road dirt, it shouldn't have any issues, but I'll give another go.

I also don't believe there's any issue with the climate control system.

I should also clarify that it's worse in damp weather, but not when it's raining. So it's perhaps humid outside, and colder in the cabin. The outside glass looks like an atrium

Controlling the temperature does seem to clear it, but that could be a coincidence? Also, winding down a dark, slick road, isn't he time to be playing with controls. The fact is, I've never had a vehicle with glass that is so temperature sensitive. It's NOT often, but always happens at the worst times. I have driven through torrential downpours, even with this RL, and have never felt the need to pull over. However, when this glass acts up in certain situations, I would actually pull over if there was a shoulder, just to set the temp and get the outside window to clear. It's just stupid.

I'll take notice next time, but it might also be at the outset of the trip, so perhaps I just sit and wait before pulling out. You know, that also gives the GPS time to wake up, the phone to connect, etc., etc. This is the slowest starting vehicle that I've ever had. I'm working hard to overlook some of these shortfalls, no vehicle is perfect. but when safety becomes an issues, I have to address it.

Can't wait for winter!
 

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I only had one such issue, when I first bought the car back in 2010. It was a combination of few things. A very wet towel in a tote, recycling mode on (rather than the fresh air) and a rather clogged up cabin filter.
BTW, make sure that the air intake for the cabin, which should be where the wiper stalk bolts up, is clean and not clogged up.

Though I have a G1, bear with me on my practice.
  • I use regular car wash, the one that many seem to be scared off as it bombs your car
  • I use only RainX orange washer fluid
  • outside gf the windshield: I clean it with the Invisible Glass (mentioned above) or RainX glass cleaner and use either a shop towel or a regular paper towel. Then I go back with a clean microfiber towel.
  • Inside of the windshield: I clean with invisible glass or rainX glass cleaner
  • When the defrost mode is on, typically in the winter, the temp dial is at the 10/11 O'Clock position. With this, I have enough & comfortable temp in the cabin as well.
  • I only see the window fog up (on the outside) if there is ice covering the air intake port.
So yea, unfortunately I do not experience the issues you have with your G2 and it could be attributed to where I live and also my practice above.
 

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A very simple and effective way to clean the inside of the windshield (and other windows) is to just use the squeege at the gas pumps. You basically just shake out the excessive water and just wash the window and then squeegee it dry. Any streaks just have some blue paper towels ready and wipe off the excess water and it's done. This is the best way I've found to clean the windows streak free. Windex while a good product doesn't work nearly as well on car windows. And this way is free. Well, almost free as you have to pay for the gas anyway.

Steve
 

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For inside fogging the glass should be clean. Then running de-fog lowers the dew point since the A/C runs, and raising the temperature control to hot creates a dew point spread to evaporate the moisture, and also the heat prevents exterior condensation.
 

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Since the condensation is on the outside, as others have stated, the windshield is most likely being overly cooled on the inside. You can override the automatic climate control and tell it to direct air through the defroster. You can turn the fan down. You can call for a lower temperature. All these things could in the right outside climate cause outside condensation. Besides that, I believe the auto climate control has a tendency to defrost too frequently. Think about how you use the climate controls. Hope this helps.
 

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Two issues I'm having and one is almost a deal breaker to the point of trading out. Sounds dramatic, but I'm at my limit with it.

Qualifier: I only use brushless, contact-free car washes and only get the Express wash, so no Rainx or other coatings. That's not to say some of those systems don't get wax on your glass at times, but as a rule I don't request it.

- first off, I notice horizontal, razor like, scratches in the glass. You can't feel any of them and they're almost cobweb like. I haven't put much time into these, so maybe it's rare, but I need to look closer. Just curious if anyone else noticed something like this.

- Now the worse problem. In all my years of driving, and in the 2017 Explorer I had as well, I never really thought much about defrosters. The window fogs, you hit the defroster, window clears in seconds, done deal. And that's on the fairly rare occasion that I would need a defroster. In the RL, the windshield can't seem to stand any real variance between cabin and ambient temperature, then fogs or worse, condensates. I know humidity has been high this year, but WTH. It's too the point where it's dangerous to drive.

The window fogs, I hit the defroster, but the if temperature isn't set correctly, the window not only doesn't clear, it gets worse. of course, it seems to happen when I'm on a dark road, with the family, sometimes in the rain, and it's down right dangerous. We went on a family trip to Deep Creek, MD. almost 5 hours each way and it was great trip. However, during the vacation, using side roads in VERY lite rain, there were times when I could hardly see. My guess is that my A/C is on lowest, so when I hit the defroster I then have coldest air, hitting the warm windshield. Which begs the question, when was the last time I needed a defroster in the summer!!

Not only doesn't not clear, unless I fiddle with the temperature, the condensation forms in shapes on the outside of the windshield. At first, I thought it was dirt grabbing the condensation, but I'm not sure what the heck is going on.

My 73 Duster did a better job of clearing the windshield. Is there something with the type of glass? If so, why didn't my 17' Explorer have this issue.

Any help is appreciated.
I have both a 2006 ridgeline and 2017 ridgeline and washed cars for 50 years. I haven't noticed any interior fogging issues but new Toyotas had issues with new vinyl VOCs that fogged their glass for the first year or so. They gave us fits cleaning at our full service locations. Maybe it's a similar issue. Horizontal scratches on the windshield are usually from scraping ice but could be from razor blade cleaning as well, if that has been done. But definitely done by a human standing on the side, not a machine or environmental issue.
 

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Sound like maybe the AC compressor is not kicking on during defrost. Also, fogging seems to be a lot worse when the inside of the windshield is not clean. A sunshade on the dash when parked greatly reduces the oily stuff that outgases from the dash from getting on the windshield, but of course the inside of the windshield still needs to be cleaned on occasion.
 

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If your truck has the acoustic windshield that could be a difference in behavior from your previous vehicles. A heavier/thicker windshield might take longer to conduct defroster heat to the outside of the glass to begin removing condensation.
Mine has the acoustic windshield and I've not experienced a problem, but wouldn't expect one in the climate here.
 

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The driver's side window (only) on my '19 came etched with horizontal streaks - I can see and feel them. Car wash soap, glass cleaner, and a clay bar had no effect. I'm sure my dealer would replace it under warranty, but I'd rather live with it than take it in.

I used to clean glass with Windex and paper towels back in the 80's. Then, I switch to newspaper. Then, I switched to Stoner Invisible Glass. Then, I switch to microfiber towels. Then, I switch to Sprayway Glass Cleaner. In 30+ years of detailing vehicles, I've never found anything that streaks less than Sprayway + microfiber.

The microfiber towels get washed in hot water with laundry detergent, double rinsed, and tumble dried without fabric softener.
 

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The driver's side window (only) on my '19 came etched with horizontal streaks ….
That's a total bummer. 'Fraid I'd have to let the dealer touch my RL to get a good glass panel (gritting my teeth all the way, between an OCD rock-and-a-hard-spot, figuring I can remediate any door-panel screw-ups). But then I don't expect to flip mine before the warranty is up :LOL:

I've never found anything that streaks less than Sprayway
Ditto - and it's cheap at small-town Walmart.
 

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I have been told by detailers (pro detailers) that a mister clean magic eraser is excellent at removing the buildup on the inside of a windshield. I tried it on a rental car and it seemed to work pretty well. I clean my inside windows frequently enough that I don't seem to have a problem with buildup.
 
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