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That's assuming that one really wanted the RL in the first place.
I thought about waiting (well, I actually did for about 4 months) but I like the '19 version better than the current alternatives. Since the '19 RL was better for me than a '19 Taco, that would never have been an option.

If the currently released 2020 models of the other manufacturers had some great update that met my needs better I might have been tempted but they still don't offer the 99.9% ride comfort and daily utility that the RL offers. My "off road" is limited to a couple of treks down a dirt road a couple of times a year and my towing is relatively lightweight implements of lawn destruction a couple of times a summer.

So the '19 RL is good for me now (& will be good for my wife driving to work in the snow). Don't know what the 20s might possibly have that I "need" vs might decide I'd like. I did get the RTL-E so there's probably not much that will change at the higher trim levels vs stuff moving down-trim. Maybe some of the Canadian model stuff like heated rear seats but since it's mostly a one or two person vehicle for us, no biggie 🙂
 

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The word on the street is the '19s will be around for awhile after the '20s are introduced.
It doesn't seem unusual for two model years to be produced concurrently as evidenced by information provided to the NHTSA by Honda.

For example, 2018 model year production began 7/27/2017 while 2017 production continued until 8/31/2017 resulting in an overlap of about a month. 2019 model year production began 1/9/2018 while 2018 production continued until 3/7/2018 resulting in an overlap of about two months.

395875
 

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I’m with you. I couldn’t wait and needed to make a move before rigamortis sets, this weekend I was offered a great deal over at their competitors (Toyota). Moving on with my New 19’ Tacoma TRD Pro with no regrets. It’s been great reading/learning about the 2020 Ridgeline “that could have been”, but I need to get going. Best of success to those hanging in their for their 20’👍
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Absolutely nothing wrong with this Tacoma. It looks so much more aggressive than the RL, No cost savings though, with the TRD Pro.
 

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Absolutely nothing wrong with this Tacoma. It looks so much more aggressive than the RL, No cost savings though, with the TRD Pro.
I like the looks of the Tacoma better myself. But it does not fit rear facing kids seats behind driver and passenger for one. And rides worse then my frontier :p

And the rear drum brakes seem crazy. But I did like that on my 1st Gen tundra. Have me a real brake as a parking brake for towing!
 

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Not to mention that the 2020 RLs probably won’t have the same level discounts the 2019 currently has...

But yeah, got a 19 BE since I got tired of waiting around...


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Absolutely nothing wrong with this Tacoma. It looks so much more aggressive than the RL, No cost savings though, with the TRD Pro.
Unless. . .You don't like sitting on the floor while driving, or you want a rear seat that an adult could sit in, or you want a smooth car like ride with car like handling to go with it, or you would rather have a trunk than a tool box taking up space in the bed, or (in general) you don't want a vehicle that makes large compromises (see all the ones mentioned above) so that it can perform well off road. . .
 

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Unless. . .You don't like sitting on the floor while driving, or you want a rear seat that an adult could sit in, or you want a smooth car like ride with car like handling to go with it, or you would rather have a trunk than a tool box taking up space in the bed, or (in general) you don't want a vehicle that makes large compromises (see all the ones mentioned above) so that it can perform well off road. . .
Every vehicle is a compromise. The rl unibody that gives it better interior space and on road manners along with a trunk compromises it's towing capacity, off road ability and bed height. Everyone will put a different weight on which is bigger to them.

The Toyota truck platforms are almost old enough to drive themselves. I am willing to bet the new global truck platform that will be coming with the 2021 tundra, and will soon after be used for the Tacoma will drastically reduce their current shortcomings. Until then I agree the rl is better for most people that don't use their truck for work or who aren't hard core outdoor adventurers.

The problem is that most people fancy themselves as a potential hard core user, even though 75% never will be.
 

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That's exactly why Ridgeline sales were over 3K+ units for the month of August. Consumers are afraid of that transmission and the quirky shift lever on the 2020.
That's possible, but my money would be on the special financing and the $1500 cash incentive.

I doubt most people even know that the ZF9 is coming, and probably even fewer even care one way or the other. We know, because we are enthusiasts, but most people couldn't even tell you that the Ridgeline was among the nicest pickup trucks unless they actually drove one. Heck, there're a lot of people that don't even know the Ridgeline exists!
 

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Every vehicle is a compromise. The rl unibody that gives it better interior space and on road manners along with a trunk compromises it's towing capacity, off road ability and bed height. Everyone will put a different weight on which is bigger to them.
I agree with most of what you say. I would say that I don't think the RL's unibody architecture is a limiting factor on its towing capacity. That's probably a function of its drivetrain and Honda's own conservativeness in their tow ratings.
I don't think the Tacoma tows much if any better at the 5K mark and none of the midsizers are really a good choice as a tow vehicle if you are routinely towing much more than 5k.

What's the bed height and depth of a Tacoma? Its engineering for off roading makes for a pretty shallow bed that's pretty high off the ground too.

A new global platform should help with driving dynamics some and hopefully Toyota will get serious about the rear seating area. Still when the need of ground clearance is combined with a body on frame design, you are pretty much guaranteed a high step up into the cab and a high starting point for the seats. How tall are you going to make that cab before it really starts to be ridiculous from an aesthetic / areo perspective. Basically there is a reason that you sit on the floor in a Tacoma. That's the off roadworthiness combined with BOF design. I doubt that will change much but maybe they will figure out something better than the current setup.
 

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I went ahead and got a 19 RTL-E last week after a 2nd test drive. I love the current transmission, and I feared what the new tranny would offer. I also prefer the current White Diamond Pearl over the newer, whiter, platinum white. Then the dealer offered $3500 off, and it was a no brainer. RTL-E for $35,700 plus taxes/title/tags.
 

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I agree with most of what you say. I would say that I don't think the RL's unibody architecture is a limiting factor on its towing capacity. That's probably a function of its drivetrain and Honda's own conservativeness in their tow ratings.
I don't think the Tacoma tows much if any better at the 5K mark and none of the midsizers are really a good choice as a tow vehicle if you are routinely towing much more than 5k.

What's the bed height and depth of a Tacoma? Its engineering for off roading makes for a pretty shallow bed that's pretty high off the ground too.

A new global platform should help with driving dynamics some and hopefully Toyota will get serious about the rear seating area. Still when the need of ground clearance is combined with a body on frame design, you are pretty much guaranteed a high step up into the cab and a high starting point for the seats. How tall are you going to make that cab before it really starts to be ridiculous from an aesthetic / areo perspective. Basically there is a reason that you sit on the floor in a Tacoma. That's the off roadworthiness combined with BOF design. I doubt that will change much but maybe they will figure out something better than the current setup.
It's funny how Honda and Toyota are stubbornly approaching the market from opposite ends of the midsize spectrum. Would the Ridgeline be considered a more capable truck (offroad) if there was clearance for larger tires and more aggressive sheet metal? Will the Tacoma's power seat solve the comfort complaint? I am deciding between these 2 looking toward 2020 models, and the best I've come up with is that I am not any closer to a decision.

I will say that the Ridgeline is more of an afterthought from factory/corporate/dealer perspective than the Tacoma, and having the company excited about its own product means something to me. I know that the Alabama plant runs at capacity, and there is not place to build more. If sales/interest were to grow, would they offer more support to the platform like building a new factory for expanding the offering.
 

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I agree with most of what you say. I would say that I don't think the RL's unibody architecture is a limiting factor on its towing capacity. That's probably a function of its drivetrain and Honda's own conservativeness in their tow ratings.
I don't think the Tacoma tows much if any better at the 5K mark and none of the midsizers are really a good choice as a tow vehicle if you are routinely towing much more than 5k.

What's the bed height and depth of a Tacoma? Its engineering for off roading makes for a pretty shallow bed that's pretty high off the ground too.

A new global platform should help with driving dynamics some and hopefully Toyota will get serious about the rear seating area. Still when the need of ground clearance is combined with a body on frame design, you are pretty much guaranteed a high step up into the cab and a high starting point for the seats. How tall are you going to make that cab before it really starts to be ridiculous from an aesthetic / areo perspective. Basically there is a reason that you sit on the floor in a Tacoma. That's the off roadworthiness combined with BOF design. I doubt that will change much but maybe they will figure out something better than the current setup.
Tacoma tows 6,800 pounds, gm twins 7,700. I tried looking for the video and couldn't find it again, but in an interview with a Ridgeline engineer he said unibodies need to be beefier than a traditional frame to tow the same amount, so you can get a unibody to tow 8,000 pounds but the vehicle weight would get unmanageable. So weight is a limiting factor. Think about it and it makes sense, the engine and hitch are basically connected with a straight line of steel, which would be inherently stronger (when talking about pulling a load) than a web of unibody.

A unibody vehicle should be lighter than an equivalent body on frame vehicle, but the Ridgeline is 100 pounds heavier than an equivalent Tacoma because they had to do significant unibody beefing to get to their 5,000 pound rating.

As for bed height, I can't find numbers, but my brother in law has a trd Tacoma and leaning on his bed side is the same as leaning on a Ridgeline bed side and his bed sides are deeper, so the bottom of his bed is lower. Just look at the height of the wheel wells in the bed of a Ridgeline compared to other trucks, that will tell you the bed on a Ridgeline is higher relative to the wheels than other trucks. Maybe 6" max, might not seem like a lot until you are trying to load a motorcycle.

I agree, any body on frame vehicle will always have a shorter cab with less interior room.
 

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I went ahead and got a 19 RTL-E last week after a 2nd test drive. I love the current transmission, and I feared what the new tranny would offer. I also prefer the current White Diamond Pearl over the newer, whiter, platinum white. Then the dealer offered $3500 off, and it was a no brainer. RTL-E for $35,700 plus taxes/title/tags.
If you got it for $35.7k, that’s a lot more than $3,500 off.
 
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