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Like the title says my impressions and comaparisons after 30 days
My first impressions is it is pretty remarkable how many similarities the two manufactures and models share. First off I really liked my Outback but I really need the utility of a truck bed for my lifestyle and by no means did I ditch the outback because I was unhappy with it. The Ridgeline has many of the features that I had become accustomed to in the Outback. Collision warning, lane departure basically all the safety features and adapative cruise control, apple carpaly etc. I'm really happy with all of those features

Here are the things that the Ridgeline falls short on.
The deluxe sound system is painfully anemic compared to Outback Harman Kardon deluxe system, in fact the best speaker performance is not even in the cab, more on that in a minute. It's time for Honda to enlist the help of Audio professionals Like Subaru with Harman Kardon or Mazda with Bose.
Drivers seat adjustments, while they are adequate the Subaru offers one or two other adjustments that make a big difference.
Running lights on while remote start used for warm up. Seems like a small thing but it one of those you don't realise how important it was to you until you dont have it.
No air foil for the sunroof when opened, again you don't miss it until you don't have it
Adaptive cruise control is clunky

Here are things that the Ridgeline has over the Outback
One remote, the outback required two remotes to operate and remote start. Also the Outback remotes are huge, pocket space is at a premium.
Walk away lock function, this is as handy as a button on a shirt.
The head unit for programming or changing features is incredibly user friendly, the Subaru is definately not
Added trunk space, one of may favorite features
Tailgate/bed sound system, as I eluded to this is the best sounding speaker/exciter group in the entire vehicle, too bad this sound quality can be enjoyed inside the cab.

As far as ride and handling I think they are pretty much equal, at least to me.
I am really enjoying my new Ridgeline and understanding that somethings are just different. My biggest gripe is the sound system and from what I see I'm not alone. Hopefully this is something that Honda will figure out how to make better.

Really enjoying this group too.
 

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I am went from a 2018 Limited 3.6 Outback to a 2021 RTL-E - for the same reasons as you , plus I pull a small boat.

Nevermind the Harmon Kardon, the Honda is not as good as the standard Subaru Radio ( when it worked) However -most of the time my Android Auto did not work over the 3 years I had the Subaru so the Ridgeline has that in its favor.

The RTL-E shuts off the radio with the ignition, The Subaru leaves it on for a bit - But the Subaru also would drain the battery if you did not start the car every few days so I think it had way to much draw to the head unit when off.

The Subaru had much more visible blind spot alerts in what I feel is a better location ... I never see the RTL-E ones unless I look since they are too far from the mirror.

The Subaru collision avoidance was useless in the snow as it was camera based and it would shut off , I perfer Honda's radar based.

I never use cruse control so no opinion.
 
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I am went from a 2018 Limited 3.6 Outback to a 2021 RTL-E - for the same reasons as you , plus I pull a small boat.

Nevermind the Harmon Kardon, the Honda is not as good as the standard Subaru Radio ( when it worked) However -most of the time my Android Auto did not work over the 3 years I had the Subaru so the Ridgeline has that in its favor.

The RTL-E shuts off the radio with the ignition, The Subaru leaves it on for a bit - But the Subaru also would drain the battery if you did not start the car every few days so I think it had way to much draw to the head unit when off.

The Subaru had much more visible blind spot alerts in what I feel is a better location ... I never see the RTL-E ones unless I look since they are too far from the mirror.

The Subaru collision avoidance was useless in the snow as it was camera based and it would shut off , I perfer Honda's radar based.

I never use cruse control so no opinion.
Interesting thread. I cross shopped the Outback to the RAV4 back in 2016. Traded it in last week for my RL. Haven’t had it in the snow yet.

Do you get false alerts with the collision avoidance? My RAV4 would go nuts at stops in heavy snow.
 

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No air foil for the sunroof when opened, again you don't miss it until you don't have it
If you mean one of those plastic visor looking things that cover part of the opening. I have to disagree with you, I hate those things, much like window deflectors I would pass on any vehicle that had them.

Running lights on while remote start used for warm up.
I actually prefer no lights on when remote start, no reason to advertise - but that's my preference.

As far as the sound system - yup it could be better, but it works.

With all that said, I love reading people's comparisons when they are constructive and honest. Which this one is :D
 

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I own a 2018 Outback Limited 3.6R and a 2017 Ridgeline RTL. Here are some of my observations.

The Outback is a very nice vehicle. I think the front leather seats are more comfortable in the Outback.

The mpg comparison of the two vehicles is nearly identical in real world driving. The second row seating area advantage goes easily to the Outback, as there is significantly more legroom and the seats recline.

I don't have any "safety" features on the Ridgeline, so I won't speak to that. The adaptive cruise is nice on the Outback as well as the rear cross traffic alert and rear emergency braking.

Initially, we had problems with the infotainment unit in the Outback, but those have been resolved. The speakers are preferred in the Outback. The Ridgeline sound system in the RTL-T is nothing special.

I prefer the 6-speed on the Ridgeline to the CVT on the Outback. The CVT chirps each time, the car is shifted into reverse from park.

They are both great vehicles and I am pleased to have them in our fleet.
 

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I own a 2018 Outback Limited 3.6R and a 2017 Ridgeline RTL. Here are some of my observations.

The Outback is a very nice vehicle. I think the front leather seats are more comfortable in the Outback.

The mpg comparison of the two vehicles is nearly identical in real world driving. The second row seating area advantage goes easily to the Outback, as there is significantly more legroom and the seats recline.

I don't have any "safety" features on the Ridgeline, so I won't speak to that. The adaptive cruise is nice on the Outback as well as the rear cross traffic alert and rear emergency braking.

Initially, we had problems with the infotainment unit in the Outback, but those have been resolved. The speakers are preferred in the Outback. The Ridgeline sound system in the RTL-T is nothing special.

I prefer the 6-speed on the Ridgeline to the CVT on the Outback. The CVT chirps each time, the car is shifted into reverse from park.

They are both great vehicles and I am pleased to have them in our fleet.
Does your car battery drain when the car is left for a few days in the cold?
 
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Does your car battery drain when the car is left for a few days in the cold?
Not so much after a few days in the cold, but certainly if left for more than one week. Our battery has been replaced once. No problems since we had two updates done to the infotainment system. Evidently, the radio was draining the battery somehow.
 

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Here is the main difference between the Outback and the Ridgeline. I scanned existing codes with my BlueDriver and the Ridgeline never has any, but the Outback, that is another story.

An airbag light just popped up on the dash, so I guess the Subaru will be visiting the dealer.
 

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Here is the main difference between the Outback and the Ridgeline. I scanned existing codes with my BlueDriver and the Ridgeline never has any, but the Outback, that is another story.

An airbag light just popped up on the dash, so I guess the Subaru will be visiting the dealer.
I had one major engine failure that took 3 days to fix, and multiple dead battery incidents plus strange issues with the CVT when shifting from forward to reverse. All of which caused me to lose confidence in keeping it post 36,000 miles.
 
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I agree, we are not sold on Subaru as far as the engine or transmission is concerned. Definitely not Subaru fan boys. I have already shared the story of how the police reported (2) yes, two carfax incidents on our Outback within two days, when a guy in a pickup nicked the rear drivers side bumper of our car on the highway. I buffed out the scratch and that should have been the end of the story, but the value of our Outback was severely impacted, so we are "stuck" with it. Not that we don't like it, just not as reliable as our Camry or my Ridgeline.
 
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I agree, we are not sold on Subaru as far as the engine or transmission is concerned. Definitely not Subaru fan boys. I have already shared the story of how the police reported (2) yes, two carfax incidents on our Outback within two days, when a guy in a pickup nicked the rear drivers side bumper of our car on the highway. I buffed out the scratch and that should have been the end of the story, but the value of our Outback was severely impacted, so we are "stuck" with it. Not that we don't like it, just not as reliable as our Camry or my Ridgeline.
I had a full accident but was still able to get 23,000 on trade with 30 k miles. I think I lost about 2k due to the accident.
 
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I had a full accident but was still able to get 23,000 on trade with 30 k miles. I think I lost about 2k due to the accident.
If it would have been counted as only 1 accident as it should have been, that would have been our loss in value also, but two is $4K. But, on the other hand my wife made it to work in the 24" blizzard we had recently, and her Camry never would have.
 
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No air foil for the sunroof when opened, again you don't miss it until you don't have it
I’d contact your dealership if this is missing on your RTL-E. My RTL-E has a spring loaded air deflector that ”pops-up” every time the sunroof is opened. It’s very effective.
 

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I’d contact your dealership if this is missing on your RTL-E. My RTL-E has a spring loaded air deflector that ”pops-up” every time the sunroof is opened. It’s very effective.
Well hacksaw my legs and call me shorty. I open the sun roof and it looks like the spring is stiff or something but there it was, it took just a little nudge and it popped up. I’ll have to see if it loosens up. Thanks!
 

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Speaking of the Outback. I did not want to start another thread. Took the Outback into the Subaru dealer today to get a few things done: air bag light on, rough idle, hesitation on take-off, multiple trouble codes, and new wiper blades (they are cheap at the dealer). The service writer asks me how long I expect the work to take? I told her tomorrow sometime would be fine. She goes on to tell me that her team (service writers and techs) will be off for the next four days, implying that my car might take as long as 5-6 days to repair.

I told her that was unacceptable. She said she would speak with the tech after he had an opportunity to look over the vehicle and get back with me. I agreed. If this works out the way I fear it will work out, we will be visiting the Toyota dealer sooner than later.

Why is it my problem that her team is off for the next four days? Mike Shaw Subaru has continually taken much longer than normal to get work done. No offer of a rental car even though we have an extended Subaru warranty on the vehicle.
 

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Speaking of the Outback. I did not want to start another thread. Took the Outback into the Subaru dealer today to get a few things done: air bag light on, rough idle, hesitation on take-off, multiple trouble codes, and new wiper blades (they are cheap at the dealer). The service writer asks me how long I expect the work to take? I told her tomorrow sometime would be fine. She goes on to tell me that her team (service writers and techs) will be off for the next four days, implying that my car might take as long as 5-6 days to repair.

I told her that was unacceptable. She said she would speak with the tech after he had an opportunity to look over the vehicle and get back with me. I agreed. If this works out the way I fear it will work out, we will be visiting the Toyota dealer sooner than later.

Why is it my problem that her team is off for the next four days? Mike Shaw Subaru has continually taken much longer than normal to get work done. No offer of a rental car even though we have an extended Subaru warranty on the vehicle.
If it makes you feel any better my Toyota dealer was routinely working 2-3 weeks out for routine service appointments. I guess they’re having a hard time hiring people that want to work and know how to do the job.
 

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Nobody wants to work right now - they can make more from unemployment + COVID relief. We cut our shop back to 3 days a week last year and can't get the guys to come back to 5 days because they're making more by not working.

Subaru is one of those brands that I've never paid much attention to. Back in the late-1980's, my grandfather had one as a loaner. I think it was a GL-10. I remember it had a turbocharged engine, a mesmerizing digital dash, and the spare tire was mounted on top of the engine. I though the SVX was a cool car back in its day.
 

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Wow.. I came from a 2018 3.6R Limited Outback and agree with most of the comments. I did go with an RTL, not an RTL-E, and think the RL is more comfortable and quieter than the Outback. I liked the BSM on the Outback better than the RL. And most definitely the sound system, the Outback was an awesome sound system for factory. I do really like on the RL that when I turn off the radio it stays off until I want it back on, not like in the Outback as it comes on every time you start the car. Anyways, I'm loving the new truck. I've had it for almost three weeks and already have 1200 miles on it.
 

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I like the Ridgeline's full rim heated steering wheel, as opposed to the "portions" of the steering wheel heated on my sister's Outback.

Last Outback I had was a 2007, the airbag lights started coming on in the overhead console tell-tale lights, but it was simply microscopic fractures in the soldering of the LEDs to the circuit board, causing a fault code. Hopefully Subaru doesn't still have that problem.
 

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Subaru is one of those brands that I've never paid much attention to.
After I rolled my '77 Toyota FJ40 (purchased new in March, rolled in October) we purchased a new 1978 Subaru station wagon. FWD with a single-speed transfer case for 4WD. It was great in the South Dakota snow but horrible to stay warm while driving. Even with the radiator covered up with a piece of tarp the defroster & heater never worked and we had to scrape the frost off the windows on the inside while going down the road.

When I went to pick up my newborn daughter, January 1979, I kept the car running, while parked, for about an hour that it took to get her at the hospital. The ice had melted on the floorboards during that time but refroze in the 30-minute trip back home. My ex-wife hated that car and was rear-ended which totaled it.
 
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