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I used to live in Oregon and HATED not being able to pump my own. I had a really nice Vanagon Westy at the time and they'd always dribble gas down the side. Also a royal pain to fill gas cans for the lawnmowers, etc. You have to personally get the cans out, set them on the ground, take the caps off, and stand and wait while the staff fills them.
 

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Bought a 2019 RTL-E 3 weeks ago. All of 300 miles and it died.

Could not move reported every system had a problem so it refused to start.

Turns out there is a faulty cable connecting the gas cap.

That is really stupid, a non essential, non safety, related item fails and the truck cannot move under its own power.
WHHYYY.... You're not considering the damage to our planet caused by gas fumes leaking out of the tank into the atmosphere... Worse than cow farts, you know... We need to outlaw cars and cows and human should be forced to drink anti-gas stuff to keep them from contributing gasses!!! Only 10 years left you know... :rolleyes:;):D
 

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When traveling I sometime go a gas station in Lakeview, Oregon--the only one in the county open in the evening so there is a loophole that lets me pump my own gas.
 

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Just curious, what is the logic/rationale behind the law requiring an attendant to pump gas?

I remember on a trip to NJ one time I was surprised by this and told the attendant I'd pump it myself. No argument from the attendant and so I did.
 

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That statute tells me nothing. We all know gasoline is flammable.
 

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Just curious, what is the logic/rationale behind the law requiring an attendant to pump gas?
This is only a partial answer and most likely will not satisfy you but is one reason for requiring attended refueling.

I've been out of the fire service for over 20 years so this information is dated. My partially educated guess is that there is/was a clause in the NFPA Fire Code that required an automatic extinguishing system to be installed in the canopy when unattended fueling was to be practiced. Attended fueling did not require the automatic extinguishing system. Some stations received an unwanted violation notice when allowing unattended fueling without a canopy system. It was cheaper to install the system while under construction than to retrofit to an existing structure. The answer may lie in NFPA 10 and NFPA 30. There is/was another NFPA Code that covered automotive fueling station but I can't seem to remember the code number. Back 20 years ago it took a $1k annual NFPA membership to have full access to the fire code.
 

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That statute tells me nothing. We all know gasoline is flammable.
You asked what the logic/rationale was behind this requirement. The statute I linked to provide 17 reasons for it.

And, while we all may know gasoline is flammable, not everyone does - you're giving society too much credit. ;)

Just recently, in fact, I personally witnessed a man filling up his truck with a lit cigarette hanging out of his mouth. I couldn't believe what I was seeing.

I've made a conscious effort to avoid cell phone use while refueling for the last few decades that I've owned one and find it ironic that all the major brands now have apps that allow you to pay at the pump using your smart phone.

I've been out of the fire service for over 20 years so this information is most likely dated. My partially educated guess is that there is/was a clause in the NFPA Fire Code that required an automatic extinguishing system to be installed in the canopy when unattended fueling was to be practiced. Attended fueling did not require the automatic extinguishing system. Some stations received an unwanted violation notice when allowing unattended fueling without a canopy system. It was cheaper to install the system while under construction than to retrofit to an existing structure.
The NFPA 30A Code for Motor Fuel Dispensing Facilities and Repair Garages was first published in 1984. Retail Gasoline Dispensing Safety Act and Regulations that prevent pumping your own gasoline in New Jersey became law in 1949. Your theory could still hold true, though. I'm required to be familiar with several NFPA standards in my primary line of work, but gas stations are not one of them. :)
 

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And, while we all may know gasoline is flammable, not everyone does - you're giving society too much credit. Just recently, in fact, I personally witnessed a man filling up his truck with a lit cigarette hanging out of his mouth. I couldn't believe what I was seeing.
"Common sense is an uncommon commodity". I don't know the author of this quote but I am frequently reminded of it.
 

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Interesting that the reasons listed for the Oregon law don't directly state the reason people always gave when I was up there--to reduce chance of spillage and the environmental consequences. But they do include the health hazard to customers from breathing the fumes while pumping gas. So instead of us receiving minor occasional exposure, the attendants are breathing it all day long--I've never seen one wearing a mask. Also, they don't want to contribute to unemployment of young people.
 

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I lieve in Oregon, and have most of my life. I absolutely hate that we arent allowed to pump our gas in most cities.
The only reason why I see it still being enacted is to keep unemployment rates down.
 

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And it's not the old-fashioned full-service. The attendant has never washed my windshield or asked to check the oil.
 

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And it's not the old-fashioned full-service. The attendant has never washed my windshield or asked to check the oil.
I've been asked many times if I wanted my windshield washed or oil check by attendants in Oregon. Not every time but enough that I found it a nice offer. When I rode a motorcycle there was never any objection to me fueling my own bike. And I had California plates on both my car and motorcycle at the time.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Bought a 2019 RTL-E 3 weeks ago. All of 300 miles and it died.

Could not move reported every system had a problem so it refused to start.

Turns out there is a faulty cable connecting the gas cap.

That is really stupid, a non essential, non safety, related item fails and the truck cannot move under its own power.
Really disappointed, 300 miles.

It's a shame I paid a premium price and it dies in 300 miles.

Actually the Ridgeline is exactly what we needed. Traded in a 2012 Nissan Frontier and a 2014 Accord for the Ridgeline.

The Frontier had 10,000 miles. My wife was having trouble getting into the Frontier, there was no way she could get into
a regular 4x4 pickup or the Jeep Gladiator, which I was aiming to buy.

The Ridgeline is just a couple of inches lower so she can get in.

We needed 4x4 or AWD and a pickup body, so the Ridgeline was a perfect match.
I love the way it drives, it rides like a large car.

I hope this is not going to be a Lemon.

The dealer says they have never seen this problem.
OK got my truck back!!

The official issue was:

396152


HNA demanded the wiring harness and pump be returned to them for analysis.

They also had never seen this problem.

I made sure they also installed the accessories I had ordered when we bought the truck.

It's was interesting the Ridgeline they gave me as a loaner was a 2017 lesser grade 2017 Ridgeline.

I found I actually missed the MoonRoof and operable rear window.

So now we will see, if the 2019 RTL-E Ridgeline is as good as it seems to be.

As I have said it is exactly what we need/wanted.

Ralph
 

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I forgot I had a moonroof until I heard a funny wind-noise and realized I'd accidentally opened it, and it was raining, and I had to pull over to figure out how to close it. Sure wish I didn't have that feature. But the opening rear window makes sense, although it is very small. On my old Chevy's I could crawl through the window to and from the shell if I wanted.

And my friend from far Northern California who visits family in Oregon fairly often said gas station attendants there tend not to offer extra services when they see a California plate.
 

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OK got my truck back!!

The official issue was:

View attachment 396152

HNA demanded the wiring harness and pump be returned to them for analysis.

They also had never seen this problem.

I made sure they also installed the accessories I had ordered when we bought the truck.

It's was interesting the Ridgeline they gave me as a loaner was a 2017 lesser grade 2017 Ridgeline.

I found I actually missed the MoonRoof and operable rear window.

So now we will see, if the 2019 RTL-E Ridgeline is as good as it seems to be.

As I have said it is exactly what we need/wanted.

Ralph
I see they replaced both the fuel pump and the wiring harness that connects to the fuel pump. The chances of both components failing concurrently is nearly zero unless the connection between the fuel pump and wiring harness overheated damaging both components.

The most likely cause of that mode of failure would be a poorly seated electrical connector either at the factory or by a dealer if this vehicle was manufactured before February 2019 and the fuel pump recall was performed. Another owner on here reported an improperly connected fuel pump following the fuel pump recall causing the engine not to start.
 

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You asked what the logic/rationale was behind this requirement. The statute I linked to provide 17 reasons for it.

snip
Hmm. The link didn't go anywhere when I clicked it, so I couldn't see any of that.

Now it's working today. Go figure.
 
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