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First let me state I have no issue with preforming maintenance as needed, but not sure about y'all, but I quit trusting "dealers" service advisors several vehicles ago. Especially @$125/hr. (that's very high here in MN). Anyway I had to take my '17 RTL-T (45K mi.) in for the hood latch recall thingy and they hit me up with most of these charges too. So I took it to my regular shop I've used for 15+ yrs., fully willing to pay him for each of these services, and was advised to do none of them. Each fluid was inspected and tested and all were good. They could've easily said I needed each service, but nope. Said come back in a year and will test again. They've never screwed me over yet (unless they were really good at it 😉), so I guess I trust them.
I'm curious how those fluids were 'tested'? The thing about doing preventative maintenance is doing things on a schedule and not waiting until something breaks. While the dealer probably makes most of their money from the shop and undeniably suggests over-maintaining your vehicle, you can err on the opposite side too and under-maintain it. You have to find the balance you're comfy with. I think most of us here more or less go along with the MM schedule.

Brake fluid, being hygroscopic, absorbs moisture from the air. Over time, internal components can rust/corrode and cause issues with the braking system. So a routine service every 3 years keeps the corrosion at bay. At 45k miles in normal service, your MM should have called out the transmission fluid change... along with the transfer assembly and rear diff service. I'm not aware of any kind of test on these fluids that can be done short of sampling them and sending them into a lab for analysis... which I sorta doubt was done here.

So your distrust of dealer suggested services should be filtered through the lens of reality too. Just sayin'. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
The only thing I would suggest is if your going to non-Honda shop. Make sure they are going to use Honda branded fluids.

When I was working at a Honda dealership all (or most) the local shops bought the fluids from us.

Sent from my SM-N975U using Tapatalk
Very good advice, the one shop i just checked ran my VIN just to get the right fluid which i appreciated
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
First let me state I have no issue with preforming maintenance as needed, but not sure about y'all, but I quit trusting "dealers" service advisors several vehicles ago. Especially @$125/hr. (that's very high here in MN). Anyway I had to take my '17 RTL-T (45K mi.) in for the hood latch recall thingy and they hit me up with most of these charges too. So I took it to my regular shop I've used for 15+ yrs., fully willing to pay him for each of these services, and was advised to do none of them. Each fluid was inspected and tested and all were good. They could've easily said I needed each service, but nope. Said come back in a year and will test again. They've never screwed me over yet (unless they were really good at it 😉), so I guess I trust them.
I move around a lot so once i find a good mechanic it’s on to the next hunt. I can’t wait to find the same you have at the moment!
 

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Hello everyone, got a recommendation from Honda telling me at 30k mileage i need the below work done:
You got a recommendation from an independently-owned Honda dealer - not Honda. There's no such thing as "30K service" from Honda. :)

Looking around for zroger73 so he doesn't catch me doing this.................................

Also, here is an additional reference that will get you close:
View attachment 421397
Now, Bill, you know I can't allow misinformation to propagate! ;)

That chart is NOT for either the 1st or 2nd generation Ridgeline - it's for the Pilot from more than 15 years ago before Honda eliminated distance-based maintenance intervals in favor of the Maintenance Minder. Furthermore, it's the "severe" schedule for the old Pilot that doesn't apply to the vast majority of vehicles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
You got a recommendation from an independently-owned Honda dealer - not Honda. There's no such thing as "30K service" from Honda. :)



Now, Bill, you know I can't allow misinformation to propagate! ;)

That chart is NOT for either the 1st or 2nd generation Ridgeline - it's for the Pilot from more than 15 years ago before Honda eliminated distance-based maintenance intervals in favor of the Maintenance Minder. Furthermore, it's the "severe" schedule for the old Pilot that doesn't apply to the vast majority of vehicles.
Well that’s one way to look at it, just when you thought you could trust anything with the word Honda on it haha very true though.
 

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1k us dollars? Rear diff and transmission should be same price at around 120. I did them in early 2020 at my local dealer.

Is there more items they are doing? Like 80 dollars for air filters, oil change and the B inspection?

At 30k you should be doing the front transfer case fluid. 1k dollars isn't right even if you do transmission, transfer case, rear diff and oil change. Should not be over 500 unless it's the 9spd transmission
Hello everyone, got a recommendation from Honda telling me at 30k mileage i need the below work done:
1. Brake fluid exchange
2. Transmission service
3. Fuel induction service
4. Rear differential service
Total cost around $1000, are any of these services REALLY needed? If you were to pick which would be the top priority? I’ve had my RL since 2017 and don’t tow or do anything crazy with it just daily driving..thanks for your thoughts!
View attachment 421396
[/QUOTE
Hello everyone, got a recommendation from Honda telling me at 30k mileage i need the below work done:
1. Brake fluid exchange
2. Transmission service
3. Fuel induction service
4. Rear differential service
Total cost around $1000, are any of these services REALLY needed? If you were to pick which would be the top priority? I’ve had my RL since 2017 and don’t tow or do anything crazy with it just daily driving..thanks for your thoughts!
View attachment 421396
At 30k you should be doing the transfer case. Not just rear differential.

Transmission fluid, front transfer case, brake fluid, rear differential. They should add up to 500 dollars or so.

I paid 100 for transmission and rear diff at dealer in 2020. Was told front transfer case also 100. Price may have gone up but 1k sounds wrong. Fuel induction service is probably bullshit and costs 500 lol. It's not part of the maintenance items per manufacturer
 

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If you have changed oil before, the trans dump and fill and rear diff change are both easy to do. The trans isn't required, but for me, the dump and fill every 10-15k will help keep fresher fluid. There is a big thread on premature failures of the 6spd. While it sounds bad, we are still talking a relatively small percentage of folks on here. It isn't worrisome enough for me to decide to get rid of the truck, just going to change fluid more often than recommended to hopefully help keep it in good running condition.

Here is a good thread on maintenance, which has links to threads on replacing the fluids: Maintenance Reference
Unfortunately I had some tranny problems and had to get the service done early. I have 36k on my 2017 and not to long ago the truck was sputtering at times and it turned out to be the tranny, so they flushed it and serviced it when I brought it in.

Since then I've had no major MM come up that required a big service. That being said I def need to get some stuff done since I'm at 5 yrs now
 
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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
1k us dollars? Rear diff and transmission should be same price at around 120. I did them in early 2020 at my local dealer.

Is there more items they are doing? Like 80 dollars for air filters, oil change and the B inspection?

At 30k you should be doing the front transfer case fluid. 1k dollars isn't right even if you do transmission, transfer case, rear diff and oil change. Should not be over 500 unless it's the 9spd transmission
That’s why i brought my question here because each service was $200-260 alone. It didn’t make any sense
 

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That’s why i brought my question here because each service was $200-260 alone. It didn’t make any sense
That’s why i brought my question here because each service was $200-260 alone. It didn’t make any sense
Maybe it's in the middle of nowhere and they don't have competition?

If you are in the military and the base is large enough mwr may have auto shops with real lifts and free tools. They charge a few bucks per hour and you can diy. Difficulty is on par with an oil change. Plenty of YouTube videos on those.

If not going to diy, call other dealers and ask how much it is for each of those service. Or try independent shops to see if they let you bring your own fluids. Just go to any honda dealer and tell parts depart the maintenance item you want to do and they will give you all the parts.

Brake fluid and front transfer case fluid dose not need to be honda branded. Transmission and rear diff must be honda branded.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Maybe it's in the middle of nowhere and they don't have competition?

If you are in the military and the base is large enough mwr may have auto shops with real lifts and free tools. They charge a few bucks per hour and you can diy. Difficulty is on par with an oil change. Plenty of YouTube videos on those.

If not going to diy, call other dealers and ask how much it is for each of those service. Or try independent shops to see if they let you bring your own fluids. Just go to any honda dealer and tell parts depart the maintenance item you want to do and they will give you all the parts.

Brake fluid and front transfer case fluid dose not need to be honda branded. Transmission and rear diff must be honda branded.
Yeah our MWR is kinda run down in Annapolis but i have contacted other shops and got a better price, the dealer here is prob just pulling my leg since I’m a new customer. Thanks for that!
 

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Brake fluid [...] dose not need to be honda branded.
From the owner's manual:

Specified fluid: Honda Heavy Duty Brake Fluid DOT 3

If the specified brake fluid is not available, you should use only DOT 3 or DOT 4 fluid from a sealed container as a temporary replacement.

Using any non-Honda brake fluid can cause corrosion and decrease the longevity of the system. Have the brake system flushed and refilled with Honda Heavy Duty Brake Fluid DOT 3 as soon as possible.
 

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From the owner's manual:

Specified fluid: Honda Heavy Duty Brake Fluid DOT 3

If the specified brake fluid is not available, you should use only DOT 3 or DOT 4 fluid from a sealed container as a temporary replacement.

Using any non-Honda brake fluid can cause corrosion and decrease the longevity of the system. Have the brake system flushed and refilled with Honda Heavy Duty Brake Fluid DOT 3 as soon as possible.
Regardless of the owners manual I agree whole heartedly with the with the idea of using non OEM dot 3/4 brake fluids. Given the uniqueness of the transmission (at least the 5/6 sp) and the rear diff, there is plenty of good arguments to be made to use ONLY the OEM fluids. On the other hand, the brake system on the Ridgeline is hopelessly ordinary. IMHO there would be no advantage to using OEM Honda brake fluid over other quality options. Reasonable cost and convenience would be my deciding factors. Same can be said about engine oil and transfer case as well. . .
 

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You got a recommendation from an independently-owned Honda dealer - not Honda. There's no such thing as "30K service" from Honda. :)



Now, Bill, you know I can't allow misinformation to propagate! ;)

That chart is NOT for either the 1st or 2nd generation Ridgeline - it's for the Pilot from more than 15 years ago before Honda eliminated distance-based maintenance intervals in favor of the Maintenance Minder. Furthermore, it's the "severe" schedule for the old Pilot that doesn't apply to the vast majority of vehicles.
Now come on Roger, he deserves kudos for trying to sneak it past you. I nearly commented on his post the other day when he made it, but I decided to sit back and wait for you to handle the misinformation, as you always do so well. :LOL:
 

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Regardless of the owners manual I agree whole heartedly with the with the idea of using non OEM dot 3/4 brake fluids. Given the uniqueness of the transmission (at least the 5/6 sp) and the rear diff, there is plenty of good arguments to be made to use ONLY the OEM fluids. On the other hand, the brake system on the Ridgeline is hopelessly ordinary. IMHO there would be no advantage to using OEM Honda brake fluid over other quality options. Reasonable cost and convenience would be my deciding factors. Same can be said about engine oil and transfer case as well. . .
I agree with you on brake fluid and engine oil, but anything drivetrain related I would not risk going non-Honda. Honda's warning about corrosion of the brake system by not using Honda brake fluid is laughable though and just CYA fear-mongering in my opinion and an easy to way drive sales/profit of OEM fluids.

And with all due respect to zroger, the statement he responded to with owner's manual quotes used the word NEED. Nobody NEEDS Honda brake fluid. There is nothing special at all about the brakes on an RL. It's an anti-lock disc brake system just like 99% of vehicles on the road today. There's plenty of evidence of a need for Honda drivetrain fluids, but there is ZERO evidence of a need for Honda brake fluid. Honda is able to easily deny liability for any issues if 3rd party fluid is used, that's why they put that there (in addition to the reasons I stated above).
 

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Honda's warning about corrosion of the brake system by not using Honda brake fluid is laughable though and just CYA fear-mongering in my opinion and an easy to way drive sales/profit of OEM fluids.
If that's true, then why isn't Honda-branded windshield washer fluid specified? A lot more washer fluid is sold than brake fluid; however, the owner's manual says, "Use only commercially available windshield washer fluid" with no mention that Honda even sells this:

Liquid Bottle Fluid Drink Cylinder



Also, why would they recommend non-Honda engine oil? "Use Honda Genuine Motor Oil or another commercial engine oil of suitable viscosity..."

If Honda was really trying to drive sales and profits of Honda-branded fluids, why choose a fluid that's only changed once every three years instead of a washer fluid or engine oil which gets added or changed much more frequently?
 

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I mean maybe that's a fair point, but it still doesn't address the fact that there's zero evidence to support the idea that one needs Honda branded brake fluid. Again, there's absolutely nothing special about the brake system, and I think you would agree with that correct?

As for the reasoning for the washer fluid, my speculation is that it's because 99.9% of washer fluid is just washer fluid. Brake fluid isn't just brake fluid, there are different specifications and it's far easier for Honda to avoid owners screwing things up if they just tell them to use the Honda fluid, as it avoids any confusion about which dot spec to use

Either way, bottom line, the Ridgeline absolutely does not need Honda branded brake fluid and unless there's some evidence to support the assertion that it does, I don't see a point in debating it. Just my two cents.

Agree to disagree.

Edit: funny enough, isn't there an entire thread dedicated to all kinds of nasty gunk found in the OEM brake system fluid reservoir?

Edit 2: to clarify, I am not encouraging other people to go out and use 3rd party fluid, I am simply saying that if you are knowledgeable about maintenance of your vehicle and going to change it yourself, I think most people would agree that there's zero reason you would have to stick with Honda fluid. What those people choose to put in their vehicle is their choice and their choice alone, they should not construe my words to be a recommendation one way or another.
 

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I think that Honda would get completely laughed at by every customer who happened to read the owners manual if they specified OEM washer fluid only. Even the ignorant wouldn't go for that.

Oil discussions are a VERY well traveled subject and there is a reasonable size population out there with both strong opinions and reasonable knowledge. Some even send their oil in for analysis. Oil is a bit like politics and I think Honda would be very hard pressed to push its own brand in those waters.
Among other things that leaves brake fluid. Its not a particularly hot or sexy topic. Why not push your own brand. Won't cause an uproar and gives at least some basis for denying warranty work (and sell your own product).
I'm no expert here but I have developed a reasonable mechanical common sense over the years. My "common sense' meter tells me there is absolutely no good reason (other than some sort of warranty / goodwill type thing) to use Honda brake fluid. . . .Feel free to exercise your own common sense . . .
 

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@nickmv, I think you sorta answered your own question (if there was a question in there).

I'd imagine Honda would find it easiest to just recommend Honda brake fluid, as that would prevent the unwitting from using DOT5 or fluid from an opened container. If the customer did do such a thing, Honda's out is that they didn't follow the manual or dealer recommendations.

Of course, those who know better should not run into any warranty issues involving the braking system with appropriate moisture-free fluids changed at recommended intervals, regardless of brand.
 

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That’s why i brought my question here because each service was $200-260 alone. It didn’t make any sense
For sure call around to different shops. Even different Honda dealer shops can quote different prices for the same job. Dealers within 15 miles of each other will even price fluids differently if you are going to go DIY. We've found some shops really like to push extras, while others are actually decent at dong what you tell them to do. Stand around in the service advisor area and give a good listen. If everyone of their advisors are pushing extras, go to another dealer... if you want to use a dealer shop at all. We have DIY'ed everything except timing belt/water pump/valve adjust for our 17 and it's actually not bad to work on if you're so inclined. At 30k, which was about my 3rd MM alert, I'd do an oil change, brake fluid exchange, 1x DF for the tranny, the rear diff, front transfer case, and change the cabin/engine air filters. Supplies for all that would probably be less than $200, provided you had the tools. Good luck!
 

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The SDS for Honda brake fluid indicates it is made by CCI who also makes Golden Cruiser brake fluid which claims to be a premium, heavy duty brake fluid that is used in almost all new automobiles in Japan. It states that "it is designed to have a higher wet boiling point than commercially available brake fluid." The SDS's for Honda brake fluid and Golden Cruiser brake fluid aren't identical which suggests a proprietary formulation for Honda. It could be better or worse, but since Honda brake fluid is the only specified brake fluid for use in Hondas, it's wise to use it at least until any warranties or service contracts have expired.
 
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