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Discussion Starter #1
First off $800 seems like quite a bit to simply put on new rotors and hand "sand" the existing pads which apparently have a lot of life left.

I have changed rotors and pads on other vehicles in the past but not my ridge. Is this something I should attempt myself? Any tips or tricks? When changing in the past I have never lubed the slide pins or other components. Is that something I should be doing? I do make sure to spray down the new rotors with engine cleaner to remove the coating on the new rotor.

Or conversely, should I just let it go. I have extreme minimal vibration when stopping and it has been that way for the last year. The dealer said the rotors have a lot of rust on the face of them (assumedly because the rotor is uneven?)

Thanks guys! :act035:
 

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I'm sorry man, this hurts to even see. First off, rotors are like, what... $40 a piece for the better ones.... I think even the cheap ones can be had for $25 each. Changing the rotors adds 5 min to each wheel on a brake job and these places make a killing on it because of all the brake bleeding they say needs to be done etc.

$800 is a huge ripoff, even for the "lifetime pads and rotors" some of these places offer.

I changed front rotors on my neighbors Infinity Q56 in my driveway in under an hour working with jack stands and a jack, not to mention I even rotated the tires. Never worked on this SUV before.

I guess you have to realize they are using specialized equipment and they are insured and that's where all the markup comes from.

Next time you need to change rotors and have $800 to throw at it, buy me a round trip plane ride to your place, I'll change it for free, (cost you some beers of course) and then you'll still save $3-400 bucks. :act035:
 

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Okay, now I'm over the shock of $800 for rotors and onto some more serious info.

Yes you should do this yourself, especially if you've done this with other vehicles, there's nothing to it. Once you get the caliper out of the way, like you would with a brake job, just remove the two bolts on the rear of the caliper mounting bracket (removing the bracket) and the rotor can just slide off, If it's stubborn, tap on it with a rubber mallet (sides not the facing). Put the new rotor on where the old one was (no special knowledge needed) and then reassemble

I would also make sure that the pins do travel smoothly on the mounting bracket (the part that bolts into the caliper), it's not uncommon for older vehicles to have a pin that is rusted in place or doesn't travel smoothly, I always lube the pins when I do a brake job, it's just in good practice to make sure they are traveling smoothly and that the rubber baffles are in place so that unwanted dirt is not getting in there. If they are dirty or do hang up then you'll end up getting a brake pad that wears at like a 45 degree angle and that also means you are not getting the full stopping force you need.

You will notice right away that the new rotors will eliminate the shaking when you brake, I would suggest to not buy the slotted rotors since you don't drive a sports car, many ppl buy these but they only wear out the pad sooner. If you do get slotted rotors, just know they are directional so you can't mix and match the sides.

Some advice on purchase and a warning, I've gotten all of my rotors off ebay for the past 7-8 years. Before that I went to Napa... I've *knock on wood* never had a bad pair from ebay, BUT, you also need to use due diligence when purchasing them, a little common sense goes a long way... I can't tell you to not buy the cheapest ones available because I've done that and had no problem, just know that most of these rotors are all made in the same exact foundry in China and that some of the cheaper ones may have not gone through the exact QR testing as the more expensive ones.

Message me if you have any questions.
 

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$800 is Highway Robbery, plain and simple. I am sure this mechanic has a very nice boat paid off by hard-working people.

Check prices at tirerack.. 4 rotors would run you a little over $200 for OEM quality and pads (Akebono, etc.) about another $120 a set for 4 wheels. Then DIY.

A good mechanic might even lightly turn the stock rotors if they meet thickness spec. Shove in new pads and button it all up for under $300.

This guy is up to about 100% in over-charging. Might give you a break on a timing belt job in the future. Maybe $1500? Unbelievable.
 

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$800 for a brake job and they aren't even going to give you new pads?!? What...does your service advisor have to come up with cash fast to pay his bookie or something?!?! Sheese...I have one word for you...RUN...!!!!

First of all, I just did my brakes rotors, replaced everything with new, and it cost me less than $250. If you get OEM it will run you more, but you'll never even reach 1/2 as much as the dealership wants to charge you.

Second of all, if you have done brakes on other vehicles, then doing the brakes on your RL will be a walk in the park. The hardest thing you will probably run into is rusted screws/bolts. But, if you put your RL up on jack stands, pull off all your wheels, hit everything with some penetrating oil, let sit for 30-45 minutes, that will help a lot.

The process is really easy...it is literally take the old stuff off and put the new stuff on and you are done...so easy in fact, it ticks me off how much these freaking garages charge people for a brake job. The last time I did brakes on my RL, it took a total of about 3 hours...from the time I pulled my truck into the garage, to the time I put the last tool away, and swept the garage floor. If I had a lift, and didn't have to sweep, it take me about an hour.

Honda dealers are not the only ones try to steal your hard earned money. I had a Hyundai garage give me an estimate of $735 to resurface the drums and put new pads on my wife's Santa Fe. Yeah, over $700 and we wouldn't have even gotten new brake rotors...!!!! I did it last weekend for $255.

They don't call those places "stealerships" for nothing.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks guys. I don't understand why they (the Honda dealership) would replace the rotors, but use the existing pads? That would seem to make it even more likely that you would warp the new rotors?

Sadly, Dealership = Stealership to often. :act060:
 

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Thanks guys. I don't understand why they (the Honda dealership) would replace the rotors, but use the existing pads? That would seem to make it even more likely that you would warp the new rotors?

Sadly, Dealership = Stealership to often. :act060:
I wouldn't worry about old pads warping the rotors; I would worry more about them not seating on the new rotors correctly, causing "glazing" on the new rotors, and/or causing damage to the new rotors.

I just don't think it is worth the risk, especially considering how cheap brake pads are. I mean, granted, like anything else, you can pay through the nose for them, but good quality brake pads should set you back about a $100 for all four corners of your vehicle. You could go cheaper, buy why? Spend around $45-$50 each, on a set of Akebono pads for the front and back, and you're all set for 1000's of miles.
 

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$800 seems like something is missing... has to be doing more then just rotors. Maybe factory rotors on both front and rear?

I have been driving my truck for 40k with warped rotors. It is just an annoyance no safety issues.But next pad change I will replace them.
 

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There could be some minor complications changing rotors since I'm assuming yours are 7 years old. Getting them off can be pain. But not an $800 pain.

Rock Auto shows a myriad of rotor options between $20 and $90 per rotor. so max rotor cost I'm guessing is something like $200. All 4 wheels Pads about $100. You pay yourself $500 to put them on!! Nice day's work.

MSRP on Honda front rotor is $129. Rear $138. This is where they are adding up the most cost. I would add there is no guarantee they will actually use OEM rotors (or pads). Both OEM rotors can had online under $100 each. MSRP on OEM pads is $80 front, $72 rear. Both are under $60 each online.
 

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For reference, I replaced the front rotors and pads on my Accord on Tuesday night. $144 including taxes for 2 new rotors, clips (sliders), pads, and lube.

Took me about 40 minutes on the first side, but 20 minutes was lost messing with the clips until I figured out they were not the correct size. The second side took under 20 mins from loosening to torquing wheel lugs.

That included cleaning and lubricating the pins and cleaning up the old sliders to reuse them once I determined the new ones weren't right. The old rotors had been on for 6 years.

Bosch rotors and pads from my local NAPA.

I would NEVER re-use old pads on a new rotor. New pads on an old rotor- if it's in good condition - but not the other way around. Why invest an hour or more of your time then cheap out the $30-40 for a set of pads?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Well guys, I called my local fix-it shop (who I have used in the past with good success) and they charge $650 for premium Napa ceramic pads and rotors installed. This includes lubing the slide pins etc. Since it appears the brakes may have been neglected by the previous owner, I'm going to let the local shop take care of it this time.

As usual thanks for the help! :act035:
 

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$800 is crazy. I spent less than $600 at Meineke for all new rotors and ceramic lifetime (free replacement) pads. Last ones they did for me lasted 80,000 miles. I'm very happy with them.
 

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NAPA parts have a good rep. Anything over $500 is hard for me to comprehend. For sure you are $150 ahead from where you started!
 
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