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I tried out the ACC (Adjustable Cruise Control) today driving down the highway. It seems a little too aggressive slowing you down. For example, I set it when I was, IMO, a decent enough distance from the car in front. ACC was in it's "furthest" following mode. ACC didn't agree that I was far enough away and applied the brakes in a manner that reminded me like when you see a cop and need to slow down in a hurry cause you realize you're speeding and just "hope" somehow they didn't get you already.

I tried it when I was going faster than the car in front of me (so ACC would need to reduce my speed and distance from car) as well as when I was matching the speed of the car in front but was closer than what ACC was set to. I can see harder braking in the first case, but not necessarily the latter and the degree of braking seemed too much in both cases.

On the flipside, when it needed to accelerate it seemed downright anemic. It took what seemed like a good 10 seconds to gain 5mph (from 60 to 65) with no traffic in front of me. I wasn't in Econ mode so wasn't that (tried econ mode separately and noticed the substantial difference in acceleration and turned it back off).

ACC is one of the tech features I was anticipating the most and, honestly, this left me quite disappointed. Perhaps there's different settings for this that I didn't notice (wasn't going to search while driving...).
 

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I see a few posts talking about the ACC hitting the brakes way too hard. I am hoping they find a fix for this before wrecks start happening from other idiots already following too close to a ridgeline and having to jamb the brakes on while trying to text...its the domino effect.
These days, everyone seems to have taken to NOT Paying attention and swerving into another lane as the most common method of avoiding an accident instead of watching the road and other vehicles.
 

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Unless I misunderstood your post, you turned the ACC on when you were already too close (in ACC's judgement) to the lead car. If that's the case, and the ACC was suddenly 'awoken' to find itself already inside the "unsafe zone," then a hard braking seems understandable. After all, a human who is reading text messages and suddenly glances up to find the car ahead is too close, would likely do the same - hit the brakes - not wait to gauge the approach velocity.

OTOH, if the ACC is already turned on and is overtaking a slower car, I would expect the ACC to just back off on the throttle, not to actually brake.
 

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2008 Ridgeline RTS in Billet Silver Metallic
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Unless I misunderstood your post, you turned the ACC on when you were already too close (in ACC's judgement) to the lead car. If that's the case, and the ACC was suddenly 'awoken' to find itself already inside the "unsafe zone," then a hard braking seems understandable. After all, a human who is reading text messages and suddenly glances up to find the car ahead is too close, would likely do the same - hit the brakes - not wait to gauge the approach velocity.

OTOH, if the ACC is already turned on and is overtaking a slower car, I would expect the ACC to just back off on the throttle, not to actually brake.
This was my experience driving a 2016 RDX. The ACC did a very nice and smooth job maintaining the set distance, to the point where I didn't realize my set speed was down 10mph to keep the distance!

I think it might be easy to confuse the CMS (collision mitigation system) action with ACC. Or maybe the two systems interact with each other. Whichever is the case, I found the system(s) troublesome when traffic merged in front of me just as I began to move to the left lane to allow them room to merge. Except the unexpected braking action killed my momentum and could have caused a problem with following traffic.
 

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I believe the firm braking is fairly typical of these systems. They don't have the brain power like we do to let off and then gently brake as a slower car is approached. ACC maintains the set speed until the slower car is at the determined distance. My wife's Avalon hybrid was even worse than the Honda for picking the speed back up. Her M-B was a little better on braking and getting back to speed. You can manually accelerate without defeating your ACC setting.
 

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I have not put on a huge number of miles so far but it was 180 miles on single lane coming back from the dealer.

Although I have noticed this, I have not seen it hit the brakes hard enough to cause a rear-end or even close to that.
Of course if the idiot behind you is texting, anything can happen, but the same is true with human driver braking.

Certainly the systems can get smarter (and are rather quickly) but one has to ask if overall the system adds to safety
or detracts from it. Right now I would still have to say that it probably adds to the safety because although it may occasionally
do things in a less than ideal fashion, mostly it gets it right. My opinion may change with time in which case there is the off switch,
but right now I think it is better on than off, at least while on a road trip.
 

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I noticed on a trip to Las Vegas and back that changing distance setting based upon the heaviness and flow of the traffic made a lot of difference. As traffic got heavier, I lessened the distance setting and didn't have issues when cars pulled in front of me to go around big trucks, RV's, etc. like when the distance setting was at the max. I also liked the fact that the system does recognize when someone pulls in front of you and is going faster than you, it will not slow you down, no matter the distance between you, initially.

I think the true learning curve to using the ACC properly is steeper than just 'turn it on and let it work' and requires more driver input than just 'set and forget'.
 

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I think the true learning curve to using the ACC properly is steeper than just 'turn it on and let it work' and requires more driver input than just 'set and forget'.
Agreed! I noticed that on my 180 miles back from the dealer. I think that it is indeed "driver assistance" as opposed to self driving or set and forget. I prefer that, myself.

Very much like the LKAS, which requires you to steer but helps keep you centered. It is an assistant, not a replacement, and if used that way, it is nice.

I may change my mind with more miles or if it does something dangerous, but so far I tend to use it most of the time on the highway if I am traveling more than 5 miles or so.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I think the true learning curve to using the ACC properly is steeper than just 'turn it on and let it work' and requires more driver input than just 'set and forget'.
Don't disagree, but I still stand by my conviction that it braked too hard in my test. If it determined it needed to brake that hard to get me to a "safe" distance then, IMO, it shouldn't have allowed me to set it in the first place. Maybe it's just me... :)

That said, since buying my BE I've had the opportunity to try it in varied conditions and such and have been happy with it and am glad I have it. I'll learn the ins and outs of when to set with more experience and always be aware of what I have the distance currently set for.
 

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On my first road trip this past weekend I used the ACC and it does take some getting used to but I kind of like it now. If a car cuts you off it will hit the brakes hard. Most of the time that happens when a faster car is weaving in and out of traffic going faster than I was. Even though the car was going faster it was in the ACC window thus brakes applied. What I did to eliminate the problem was simply put your foot on gas slightly and that deactivates the cruise until you take your foot off gas. Works just fine.


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