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Dose it work? How?
It's thicker.

Only way to know for sure would be to measure an RTS and below model vs an RTL and above.

The MDX is baby sleeping quiet, it was the first Honda product to use it I believe. The RL I drove with it was also impressively quiet.

As someone who installs aftermarket car stereos in his vehicles I'm always trying to make the cabin as quiet as possible. The windshield and windows are the only things I can't do anything about, so this is a welcomed option for me.
 

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Dose it work? How?
For decades, windshields have been made by laminating two layers of glass together using a resin. The resin is ductile which helps hold the windshield together if it shatters. "Acoustic" windshields simply use a different formulation of resin in the middle. I immediately noticed that rain drops hitting the windshield sound different inside the cabin - they sound "lighter" and higher-pitched.

It's thicker.
Actually, the "acoustic" windshield is 0.2mm thinner than the "standard" windshield.

Acoustic Windshield
Special acoustic laminated glass is used for the first time on the Ridgeline RTL and above trims to help reduce noise entering the cabin. Tuned specifically to attenuate wind-noise frequencies, the windshield glass uses an outer layer of 2.0 mm safety glass, a 0.7 mm thick middle layer of acoustic polyvinyl butyral (PVB) and a 1.8 mm inner glass layer for a total thickness of 4.5 mm. This helps the Ridgeline place at the top of its class in wind-noise performance. The windshield also incorporates UV light-absorbing technology. The RT, RTS and Sport trims utilize 4.7 mm thick laminated glass with 2.0 mm outer and inner layers and a 0.7 mm regular PVB middle layer. - 2017 Honda Ridgeline Press Kit
 

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I agree with the others, my RTS is the quietest Honda I have owned, including my 2007 TL and 2013 Accord.

On my test drives I thought that the RTL-Ts were a bit quieter but I would attribute lower road noise (from the tires) instead of less wind noise. RTL-E/BE have more insulation on the floor which may knock out even more road noise.

Of course acoustics are funny, more road noise may mask more wind noise or maybe the cloth interior soaks up some noise that the leather would not. Maybe the ANC is more effective with the more powerful stereo on the higher models.

As you go up in trim level there is more and more insulation added

From the press kit:

Noise, Vibration and Harshness (NVH) Countermeasures
The new Ridgeline has a refined, multiple-tier insulation package that takes noise, vibration and harshness (NVH) countermeasures to the next level, positioning it at the top of its competitive set.

All Ridgeline trims feature multiple strategically placed body sealants, while the RTL and above trims add internal foam front and rear door acoustic barriers, and the RTL-E and Black Edition add a high-density barrier layer beneath the floor carpeting for additional sound attenuation. Additional NVH enhancements on all models include acoustic separators applied to the lower front portion of the doorframe, upper inside and upper outside portions of the A-pillar, the lower portion of the B-pillar, the rear portion of the rear doorframe, and the upper portion of the C-pillar.

Triple door seals replace the double seals on the previous generation Ridgeline. Thicker, sound-insulating acoustic glass (see below) further aids overall cabin quietness. Engineers even took steps to stop noise from entering where the lower rear cabin wall and truck bed meet. Here, special exterior and interior bed panel insulators reduce incoming noise. Altogether, the improvements reduce uncontrolled body leak area by 75 percent compared to the previous generation Ridgeline. See Exterior section for more information.

Acoustic Windshield
Special acoustic laminated glass is used for the first time on the Ridgeline RTL and above trims to help reduce noise entering the cabin. Tuned specifically to attenuate wind-noise frequencies, the windshield glass uses an outer layer of 2.0 mm safety glass, a 0.7 mm thick middle layer of acoustic polyvinyl butyral (PVB) and a 1.8 mm inner glass layer for a total thickness of 4.5 mm. This helps the Ridgeline place at the top of its class in wind-noise performance. The windshield also incorporates UV light-absorbing technology. The RT, RTS and Sport trims utilize 4.7 mm thick laminated glass with 2.0 mm outer and inner layers and a 0.7 mm regular PVB middle layer.

Increased Window Thickness
Significantly thicker side window glass adds to the 2017 Ridgeline's gains in attenuating wind, road and mechanical noise before it reaches the cabin. The tempered glass front and rear side windows are 5mm thick, 1.5 mm or 43-percent thicker than on the previous Ridgeline. The new Ridgeline also has 4.0mm thick rear glass, which is 0.9 mm thicker than that of the previous model.
 

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Acoustic Windshield
Special acoustic laminated glass is used for the first time on the Ridgeline RTL and above trims to help reduce noise entering the cabin. Tuned specifically to attenuate wind-noise frequencies, the windshield glass uses an outer layer of 2.0 mm safety glass, a 0.7 mm thick middle layer of acoustic polyvinyl butyral (PVB) and a 1.8 mm inner glass layer for a total thickness of 4.5 mm. This helps the Ridgeline place at the top of its class in wind-noise performance. The windshield also incorporates UV light-absorbing technology. The RT, RTS and Sport trims utilize 4.7 mm thick laminated glass with 2.0 mm outer and inner layers and a 0.7 mm regular PVB middle layer. - 2017 Honda Ridgeline Press Kit.
Thanks for the info, that's interesting. I remember reading about the new MDX when it first came out and whatever automotive "journalist" simply said that the new windshield is thicker. I should know not to trust a source like that!
 

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Thanks for the info, that's interesting. I remember reading about the new MDX when it first came out and whatever automotive "journalist" simply said that the new windshield is thicker. I should know not to trust a source like that!
I used to be a big Buick (and GM in general) fan. The first time I ever heard the term "acoustic windshield" was in the early-2000s when Buick advertised "QuietTuning", which was a collection of methods and materials used to make the cabin quieter. An acoustic windshield was part of that collection. Since then, acoustic windshields have become very common. One was standard on every 2008 Ford Focus. The Civic now has one. These days, you'll find acoustic windshields all over the place even though they're not often advertised. They've been around for over a decade now. They are somewhat effective at reducing "midrange" frequencies between 1,500-5,000 Hz by 2-3 dB. Its takes a reduction of 10 dB to make something sound "half as loud. So, the reduction isn't dramatic, but if you reduce a little bit here and a little bit there, it adds up to a noticeably quieter interior.
 

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I've got a BE and a 2012 Honda CRV. The CRV is loud as **** on the highway and most folks can't hear me on a handsfree call. The BE on the other hand, I can have a conversation with even the most hard of hearing people, with a little extra effort. Something that's impossible in the CRV. Overall, the cabin noise is one of the lowest I've ever had.
 

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I guess we're stuck with having to get OEM part (windshield) and have it dealer installed ?
My wife had to get her windshield replaced on her '16 Pilot and they had to use OEM because of the various customized features. I would expect that the same will happen if we need a replacement although it would be something that I would watch for with my insurance company.
 

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I guess we're stuck with having to get OEM part (windshield) and have it dealer installed ?:smile:

Sort of. You'll get an OEM windshield but the windshield replacement company can do it. I had to do this on a previous vehicle with a special windshield but the installer took care of it (ordering and installing) without any extra work on my part.
 

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So my Dealer has some one that does so called Honda spec glass, is it a waist or is it special, After several years of off and on road, gravel roads and logging roads I have pin head pits that effect driving into the sun and my wipers for cleaning, have full glass coverage. Thing is Ive done this before with my old truck that was traded in and ten years old, my Insurance Company questions it cause its not cracked, but driving with a ten year old pitted out windshield is just as bad or worse in my world. So do I put a rock thru it and call it all good or fight it again. They did replace the one but like everything else im guilty till prove i prove my innocents.
 

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So my Dealer has some one that does so called Honda spec glass, is it a waist or is it special, After several years of off and on road, gravel roads and logging roads I have pin head pits that effect driving into the sun and my wipers for cleaning, have full glass coverage. Thing is Ive done this before with my old truck that was traded in and ten years old, my Insurance Company questions it cause its not cracked, but driving with a ten year old pitted out windshield is just as bad or worse in my world. So do I put a rock thru it and call it all good or fight it again. They did replace the one but like everything else im guilty till prove i prove my innocents.
Here in the Southwest, we get really strong winds and although My truck spend most of it's first 10 years in the Garage, the window is severely pitted and I'm considering the same options.

Innocent til proven guilty...>:)
 
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