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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We will pick up lightweight pop-up / clamp on camper top in January for AWD 2018 RL. Camper will add about #400. Wife and I add #320, and max gear for weekends / 7-10 day trips 2x year add #250 max. So under #1000 payload in all scenarios. Camper will stay on truck.

Use case - mostly highway and maintained forest roads. Plan to avoid rock crawling or even moderately intense off road stuff.

Question - will stock suspension suffice or should we modify? If modify what would you recommend?

Thanks!
 

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I've had about 4-500# in the bed for the past couple of weeks between:
rooftop tent (180)
rack (100)
Full 4G rotopax (~30)
Empty roadshower (~30)
Misc stuff (~100)

Seeing very minor squat, but other than that no major issues. I have the RTL-E with ~1500 payload capacity.
 

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Please pictures of the camper when you can. We are trying to decide between a Softopper and a Leer or ARC with the 4” rise.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I've had about 4-500# in the bed for the past couple of weeks between:
rooftop tent (180)
rack (100)
Full 4G rotopax (~30)
Empty roadshower (~30)
Misc stuff (~100)

Seeing very minor squat, but other than that no major issues. I have the RTL-E with ~1500 payload capacity.
 

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Question - will stock suspension suffice or should we modify? If modify what would you recommend?
Depending on how you drive, you may never actually feel any need to upgrade your suspension for that amount of weight. If you want to be certain you aren't wasting money and time and trouble for no reason, drive that camper around a bit before making a decision. Remember, though, that what really matters most is not so much how it handles when you are driving normally, but how it will handle when you need to make a sudden, unexpected swerve.... I posted THIS about a month ago, in response to a question about Coil SumoSprings:
#23 1 mo ago (Edited)
SuicideRabbit said:
Is anyone running these in their G2?


YES. After roughly ten years of being aware of the existence of Coil SumoSprings, and snickering that I would never inflict such a cheesy product on any of my vehicles, I found to my dismay that my 2018 RTL-E had absolutely NOTHING else available to beef up the suspension.... Since no size was listed for my application, I jacked up the truck's rear end, took a measurement, made my best guess, ordered a pair and.... WOW. Easiest mod EVER, and such a dramatic improvement that I immediately repeated the process for the front. I subsequently determined that both the front and rear Sumos I had selected could be upgraded to the next taller size.... Even more WOW. When I traded in my 2018 for a 2020 RTL-E, I pulled out the Sumos and swapped them over immediately. I haven't towed anything over 2,000lb or hauled any heavy loads, so I can't speak specifically to load carrying, but they make the truck corner much flatter, without any perceptible (to me) decrease in ride comfort. They make a substantial improvement in 'speed bump resistance' (although not quite as impervious as the leaf springs and Roadmaster Active Suspension setup I had on previous trucks- I am still working on that!). I think they are wonderful, and that you would consider their cost money very well spent. Use silicone spray to make installation SO much easier! You need CSS-1145 in the rear, and CSS-1225 in the front for best overall performance. I figured that out the hard and expensive way, and have been driving my (two) Ridgelines on Coil SumoSprings for three years with no regrets whatsoever. Honestly, I wasn't sure I wanted to just give that info out to the world, but seeing that everyone else chiming in to answer you here has no personal experience with them, and is talking as if the Sumos are comparable to rigid coil spacers out of the old JC Whitney catalog, I felt I needed to do so....
Since that time, I have upgraded my rear SumoSprings to the next larger size, CSS-1168, but that installation is far more difficult than simply slipping the Sumos between the coils while the truck is jacked up. If you have the skills/ tools/ inclination required to pull your rear shocks and springs, and use a spring compressor to remove the spring from the shock to enable inserting the SumoSpring, that is the MOST effective setup, but if it sounds like too much trouble you will probably find that the setup described above- which can be slipped into place on all four corners in a half hour- makes your camper-equipped Ridgeline feel sportier than it was when stock.

I would also recommend that when your tires get worn enough to require replacement, you replace them with 'Michelin CrossClimate SUV' tires in the slightly larger 265/60/18 size. That will give you a much greater load rating for no weight penalty at all, and SUPERB handling in wet conditions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Depending on how you drive, you may never actually feel any need to upgrade your suspension for that amount of weight. If you want to be certain you aren't wasting money and time and trouble for no reason, drive that camper around a bit before making a decision. Remember, though, that what really matters most is not so much how it handles when you are driving normally, but how it will handle when you need to make a sudden, unexpected swerve.... I posted THIS about a month ago, in response to a question about Coil SumoSprings:
#23 1 mo ago (Edited)


Since that time, I have upgraded my rear SumoSprings to the next larger size, CSS-1168, but that installation is far more difficult than simply slipping the Sumos between the coils while the truck is jacked up. If you have the skills/ tools/ inclination required to pull your rear shocks and springs, and use a spring compressor to remove the spring from the shock to enable inserting the SumoSpring, that is the MOST effective setup, but if it sounds like too much trouble you will probably find that the setup described above- which can be slipped into place on all four corners in a half hour- makes your camper-equipped Ridgeline feel sportier than it was when stock.

I would also recommend that when your tires get worn enough to require replacement, you replace them with 'Michelin CrossClimate SUV' tires in the slightly larger 265/60/18 size. That will give you a much greater load rating for no weight penalty at all, and SUPERB handling in wet conditions.
Gary thanks so much for sharing! I think SumoSpring could be perfect and thanks for recommendation on tires. Really appreciate you taking the time to share. Have a good one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Depending on how you drive, you may never actually feel any need to upgrade your suspension for that amount of weight. If you want to be certain you aren't wasting money and time and trouble for no reason, drive that camper around a bit before making a decision. Remember, though, that what really matters most is not so much how it handles when you are driving normally, but how it will handle when you need to make a sudden, unexpected swerve.... I posted THIS about a month ago, in response to a question about Coil SumoSprings:
#23 1 mo ago (Edited)


Since that time, I have upgraded my rear SumoSprings to the next larger size, CSS-1168, but that installation is far more difficult than simply slipping the Sumos between the coils while the truck is jacked up. If you have the skills/ tools/ inclination required to pull your rear shocks and springs, and use a spring compressor to remove the spring from the shock to enable inserting the SumoSpring, that is the MOST effective setup, but if it sounds like too much trouble you will probably find that the setup described above- which can be slipped into place on all four corners in a half hour- makes your camper-equipped Ridgeline feel sportier than it was when stock.

I would also recommend that when your tires get worn enough to require replacement, you replace them with 'Michelin CrossClimate SUV' tires in the slightly larger 265/60/18 size. That will give you a much greater load rating for no weight penalty at all, and SUPERB handling in wet conditions.
Just curious - why the two different models? Both CS-1145 and CS-1225 have a front and rear version. Thank you!
 

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Just curious - why the two different models? Both CS-1145 and CS-1225 have a front and rear version. Thank you!
No, there is only ONE version of each of those sizes, but BOTH of those part numbers- as well as all the others- fit many different front AND rear applications (depending solely on the size of the gap between spring coils). If you are looking at some list that shows one or the other of these is a "Front" or a "Rear" it is only indicating that for that particular vehicle, the Sumo CoilSpring is used on that axle.... Other applications can use the exact same insert on the opposite axle.
 

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I work in the trades and always have my truck packed full of tools and people. On average I'm driving around with close to 1000lbs of weight and the only difference in driving i notice with no load is acceleration and braking besides that the suspension and handling of the vehicle is the same.
 
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