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Webwader said:
He meant you hit the nail on the head, Mayfielh. :D
That's what I thought but wasn't 100%
 

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OK, a few notes here from my experiences.... (and I'm too lazy to read the entire thread now...)

The Sharpie(tm) markers are the best for marking the modern CDR discs. Some of the water/alcohol based ones never adhere to the surface, and come off. However, some of the older white (inkjet printable) discs will have the markings from a sharpie bleed after a few years, possibly effecting the data.

The best route to go is to get the inkjet-printable discs, and them use a water-based pen.

Never use labels. The heat in any in-dash player will make them peel.

For archival purposes, the biggest problem is the changes in the players. I have discs that I burned several years ago, that the new DVD-ROM/RAM/whatever drives have problems reading, but they work in other drives/players.

For archival purposes, the gold discs are the best.

Try to burn discs at the same speed they will be played, if possible. Helps with compatibility.
 

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Lady's Buck -

I bought my first CD player ($350) during my freshman year in college - my roommate told me "CD's won't Last." I still remind him of that. :D My parents never had a car with anything other than AM radio growing up. My father still thinks that having FM in a car is a "luxury."

-ridgeln
 

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I've owned a ford ranger, & Chrysler PT Cruiser & have never had any problems with the labels I've put on the CD's. It's interesting to see that someone has. Just bought an external DVD/RW hard drive with the light scribe feature, so I won't be making anymore disc labels....
 

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I'm a recovering DJ and can tell you from experience - sticker labels suck.

Heat causes problems with the sticker labels...

Age causes problems...

Even worse, the adhesive used on some sticker labels, when pulling away from the disc, pulls the coating (which contains the information) off the plastic disc and BAM!!! the disc no longer works.
 

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there are new burners out in the market uses the laser to write on the media. Some burners call them lightscribe or laser etching. It will scribe any type of label you instruct it to, so that will prevent you to either stick something on or use a cd label. These burners will ask you after burning your compilation to flip the cd or DVD over to scribe the label on via laser. my 3cent :D
 

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kanji said:
there are new burners out in the market uses the laser to write on the media. Some burners call them lightscribe or laser etching. It will scribe any type of label you instruct it to, so that will prevent you to either stick something on or use a cd label. These burners will ask you after burning your compilation to flip the cd or DVD over to scribe the label on via laser. my 3cent :D
kanji, good point. These burners are getting less expensive each day. They come in all the latest laptops and desktops. They are also available in external format so the older computers can take advantage of them. It is a slow process but works great and allows creativity in your labeling. Another option, which I use is the old "Permanent Magic Marker". With the cheap cost of bulk CD's today if I mislable it I can pitch it, make a new one in 5 mins and forget it. MTCW.
Tom:)
 

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I was curious about Honda's claim about the thickness differences in types of CDs, so I measured the thickness of pre-recorded CDs vs. the recordables in our collection.

The pre-recorded CDs we have (I measured 8 of them) vary from 0.0435" to 0.048" thick; the recordable CDs I've used measure 0.044" to 0.047" thick. So my measurements, limited though they may be, indicate that there is no real difference.

I don't see the thickness "difference" described by Honda as a problem, but the labels would add another layer of thickness which may cause a problem.

BTW, I have never used the labels, since I don't trust the adhesives or the actual label stock, and I was always worried about heat in a vehicle adversely affecting the labels.
 

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My tech just pulled out a DVD that had stuck due to a paper label, customer was LUCKY! We no charged it with a stern warning!!
 

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i just recently got my cd changer replaced under warranty for not workin....wondering if this was the case.....won't use cd's with labels anymore though....
 

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NEVER NEVER - use a Sharpie pen to write on a cd/dvd. The ink will after time eat the coating and render the disk unusable. They make special pens that are specifically designed for use on CD/DVD's. They are chemically inert unlike the sharpie ink.

I use a pen from Delkin Devices called an "Archival Gold". I found it at my local Pro Photo shop.

I also never put anything with adhesives on my disks. Once had one almost get caught in my laptop (several years ago before the inkjet printing was avaliable) NEVER again. Threw the disk and all the things to make the stickers out that day.
 

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I ended up having to re-record all my home burnt CD's to lightscribe discs because all my old CD's had the stomper type of labels (adhesive) stuck on them since my old car never had a CD player in it (I used an Ipaq handheld computer with a cassette adapter) it was okay to use them for the computer.

I've seen a lot of radios that have been replaced due to jammed CD's in them and the majority of them so far have been home burned cd's. Whether or not they had adhesive labels on them or not I don't know.

THe new software for the LIghtscribe does a nice job in graytones. It's far darker with more contrast than the earlier versions of it. And the media is now almost on the same pricing level as non lightscribe CD's. Overall I now love the lightscribe burned labels. I adopted the technology when it first came out and still have a huge spindle of CD's that I never used because the quality was pretty poor IMO when it first came out where as now, the "best" setting actually produces a nice label. The only real poor quality that I find with the lightscribe labels now is if the background is black then it produces a streaky black so I try to avoid designing lables that have pure black backgrounds.

TIp for lightscribe users: If you don't feel your cd is coming out with enough contrast, then burn the label twice and it will be with substantially more contrast. Nero allows you to set how many times you wish to burn the label (that was smart of them) and even with the new drivers, I still set Nero to burn 2 labels, and it gives some nice contrast on the burned labels.
 
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