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What is the overall consensus on getting your front end aligned after you replace all 4 tires?

I replaced all mine at DT but they dont offer alignment. My car drives fine and does not pull either direction. Still....after spending what i did on tires...i'll spend a little more if its generally accepted you should always align after new tires.
 

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Personally, if we have not had any work done on the suspension system, if the tires that we take off have been wearing evenly, then there is no need for a realignment.

Our last "new" car is a 2001 and has just short of 400,000 miles. We have had it aligned twice, the first time was when we replaced the front struts, the second time just recently replacing lower ball joints and tie rod ends.

Bill
 

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I agree with Bill. I have NEVER had my 2002 Accord coupe aligned, and it still handles awesome and has even tire wear....162k miles and counting....
 

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Discussion Starter #4
With the install of all 4 new tires...my RL drives better than before. No pull either way. Just a smooth ride.

I'll save my money then ....and spend it on my dogs!
 

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.You could go somewhere for a free alignment check as new tires are a good time to get an alignment. If the tires were wearing evenly the alignment couldn't be far off. If you are obsessed with alignment, Firestone offers a lifetime alignment for a small premium over a one time alignment.
 

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Tires have absolutely no effect on wheel alignment. The wheel alignment should be checked and adjusted if necessary following damage to the vehicle's steering or suspension system or when a component such as a tie rod is replaced.

If the wheel alignment was correct immediately before the tires were replaced then the wheel alignment will be correct immediately after the tires were replaced.
 

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The exception to these rules of course are if you get offset wheels or if you change the ride height in some way (bigger tires etc..) then a custom alignment might be needed as the specs from the factory could cause tire wear.

Steve
 

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The exceptions to these rules, of course, are if you get offset wheels or if you change the ride height in some way (bigger tires, etc..) then a custom alignment might be needed as the specs from the factory could cause tire wear.

Steve
I'm saying this from ignorance but, it seems to me that if the only thing you change is the tire size (eg. going from stock 245 to 255/265) and not the wheel or any other component, the geometry of the suspension has not changed or changed in a way that affects the alignment. Does this sound right?
 

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The exception to these rules of course are if you get offset wheels or if you change the ride height in some way (bigger tires etc..) then a custom alignment might be needed as the specs from the factory could cause tire wear.

Steve
The only alignment parameter that can be adjusted on the Ridgeline is toe which is unaffected by wheel offset or ride height. Caster and camber are not adjustable.
 

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I'm saying this from ignorance but, it seems to me that if the only thing you change is the tire size (eg. going from stock 245 to 255/265) and not the wheel or any other component, the geometry of the suspension has not changed or changed in a way that affects the alignment. Does this sound right?
@zroger73 points out that there is no OEM provision for adjusting caster or camber on the RL.

That fact notwithstanding, IMO / IME a change in tire width and/or aspect ratio, even on a given unchanged wheel-spec, may 'beg' a change in camber in particular. This because of the relationship between wear across the width of the contact-patch and camber in particular, all other things being equal.

Granting that on the street this may not manifest in a meaningful detriment within likely ranges of tire width/profile used on an OEM-spec wheel, at least for a very long time, but that may also vary depending on the tire compound involved.

Just pointing out that all of the parameters relating to "alignment", even those which may not be adjustable on a particular vehicle, are pertinent to all of the tire size parameters, and the OEM spec for both is designed to yield an 'optimum' combination in terms of both vehicle handling and tire longevity.

Again, maybe not evident in common street-use ranges of variance, and/or maybe not evident for many street-miles, but on the track one can observe how all of these parameters are interrelated and a change in any one may require an adjustment in another to achieve an 'optimal' balance of performance and longevity (track-use affording an 'accelerated', if you'll pardon the expression, environment to see these effects).

One man's experience (learned from and shared by others around the track).

(and, one reason some of us prefer to not deviate at all from the OEM-spec tire size on our street vehicles, limiting our 'playing' with such only to different manufacturer /tread design /compounds)
 

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Along those lines, my opinion is that, if you change wheel offset a great deal, it may change camber slightly, which, in turn, changes toe-in. It couldn't hurt to have it checked. My OEM Firestones cupped/feathered on the outside slightly even when my alignment was perfect. I rotated them every 5k miles. My Continental TerrainContact tires, on the other hand, show no wear at all even with a 10k rotation interval. I've noticed that some tires seem to wear more than others on Honda/Acura vehicles even when the alignment was within specs.
 

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Honda (at least their larger vehicles) seem to "hold" their alignments pretty well. Still the pounding we get in our area from pothole ridden roads does take its toll on alignment. I just changed out the OEM LTXs on my 14 with about 50k. Tires were worn fairly evenly and the the truck tracked straight. Still I had an alignment done and all four corners were in need of some small adjustments.
I personally think that it would be foolish to not have an alignment done after installing a new set of tire$. It will help to maximize the life of the new tires and insure that your handling is optimized.
 

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While I don't think it "foolish" to not get alignment at least checked when installing new tires, especially if the empirical driving seems fine and the old tires show even wear, getting new tires does strike me as an opportune time to at least have alignment checked to confirm the "If" in the following:
If the wheel alignment was correct immediately before the tires were replaced then the wheel alignment will be correct immediately after the tires were replaced.
This simply because subtle misalignment may not be felt when driving but can affect the long-term life of that new tire investment.

Admitting I don't always get alignment checked when I get a new set of tires :LOL: ;)
 

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I typically do not do wheel alignment on tire changes and I have gone through 5 sets of tires already and on my 6th set. Acutallly even when you get new tire/wheel package, you need not get an alignment.
However, I would recommend an alignment when someone changes their axles, control arm, tie rods or struts. Anything suspension related, absolutely.
 

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the tires we bought were only covered by their 80 000km warranty if the vehicle had an alignment or at least checked.
you should also get your alignment checked if you bump a curb relatively hard.
 

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I don't know how widespread the Tire Discounters chain is, but here (Cincinnati area) they've always advertised free alignment with 4 new tires, and they're typically competitive on price.
 
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