Honda Ridgeline Owners Club Forums banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
2019 RT Ridgeline ~ Luna Silver
Joined
·
500 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Not news to mostly people on the forum. Honda’s have noise canceling built in. I notice it most when I come to a stop I can hear the radio volume lower just a bit.

Works fine... funny how I just noticed that they have documented that one of its jobs is to cancel the “booming” sound in the cabin created by VCM. The system that no one notices... Well, someone noticed the booming, because they designed a system around covering it up. 😝

 

Attachments

·
Administrator
Joined
·
15,217 Posts
I notice it most when I come to a stop I can hear the radio volume lower just a bit.
In that situation, you're noticing the effects of SVC (Speed Volume Compensation) rather than ANC (Active Noise Cancellation).

SVC raises or lowers the volume with vehicle speed.

You can't (shouldn't) hear ANC working - it's designed to cancel low-frequency exhaust drone that occurs when the engine is operating as an I3 instead of a V6. :)

There are different versions of ANC - some, like the Ridgeline's, are intended solely to cancel unwanted low-frequency sound when "VCM is on" while others are actively cancelling unwanted low-frequency sound at all times. Yet another flavor of ANC is called ASC (Active Sound Control) which can add sound ("artificial engine noise") such as in the Accord and Civic.

ANC can only cancel constant, low-frequency sound - not random noise (i.e. wind/rain or road/tire noise).

ANC has been around in Hondas since 2003. SVC has been around since the early-1990s. I believe ASC first appeared in the 2010 Accord Crosstour.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
433 Posts
Not news to mostly people on the forum. Honda’s have noise canceling built in. I notice it most when I come to a stop I can hear the radio volume lower just a bit.
Thanks for the ANC information. However, the radio volume change is not the ANC. It is the SVC, Speed-sensitive Volume Compensation, which has four settings: Off, Low, Mid, and High. When turned on, as you go faster, audio volume increases, and as you slow down, audio volume decreases.
 

·
Registered
2019 RT Ridgeline ~ Luna Silver
Joined
·
500 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I have been corrected...hahaha
SVC it is...I assumed the radio raising and lowering was associated with noise canceling. :)
I was really commenting on the fact that Honda documented "VCM booming"... :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,006 Posts
I wonder why Honda only aims its noise cancellation at low-freq sounds, and only at those some of the time? The basic system is conceptually similar to what was developed in cars in the ‘80s (I want to say by Lotus, but that may be wrong), and what Bose and others use in headphones today. It can easily quiet the full human hearing spectrum of constant noises (tire and road noise, for example).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,011 Posts
In that situation, you're noticing the effects of SVC (Speed Volume Compensation) rather than ANC (Active Noise Cancellation).

SVC raises or lowers the volume with vehicle speed.

You can't (shouldn't) hear ANC working - it's designed to cancel low-frequency exhaust drone that occurs when the engine is operating as an I3 instead of a V6. :)

There are different versions of ANC - some, like the Ridgeline's, are intended solely to cancel unwanted low-frequency sound when "VCM is on" while others are actively cancelling unwanted low-frequency sound at all times. Yet another flavor of ANC is called ASC (Active Sound Control) which can add sound ("artificial engine noise") such as in the Accord and Civic.

ANC can only cancel constant, low-frequency sound - not random noise (i.e. wind/rain or road/tire noise).

ANC has been around in Hondas since 2003. SVC has been around since the early-1990s. I believe ASC first appeared in the 2010 Accord Crosstour.
I remember when my brother imstalled a Pioneer aftermarket stereo in his '73 Charger SE back in the mid-80s. He was bragging about how it had a new feature that would increase the radio volume as the vehicle speed increased.

That being said, some form of SVC has been available in aftermarket systems since at least the mid-80s. I imagine an entity like Bose may have had working versions in the lab at least in the 1970s, if not earlier.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,011 Posts
I wonder why Honda only aims its noise cancellation at low-freq sounds, and only at those some of the time? The basic system is conceptually similar to what was developed in cars in the ‘80s (I want to say by Lotus, but that may be wrong), and what Bose and others use in headphones today. It can easily quiet the full human hearing spectrum of constant noises (tire and road noise, for example).
My guess would be that it might be a safety feature to NOT have NVH canceling at more frequencies.

For example, suppose you had a belt on a tire about to blow out, so it made a loud noise but didn't trigger the TPMS until it was too late. A driver who was paying attention would theoretically hear (and feel) the bad tire and thus slow down and stop to investigate before having a blowout at 70mph+. Alternatively, if an NVH system could have reduced those sensory inputs at all, a good lawyer could have a field day if their client was injured.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
15,217 Posts
I wonder why Honda only aims its noise cancellation at low-freq sounds, and only at those some of the time? The basic system is conceptually similar to what was developed in cars in the ‘80s (I want to say by Lotus, but that may be wrong), and what Bose and others use in headphones today. It can easily quiet the full human hearing spectrum of constant noises (tire and road noise, for example).
Cancelling noise on the listener-side of noise-cancelling headphones that is picked up by microphones placed on the outside of the headphones is one thing. Cancelling noise on the inside of an open cabin that is picked up by microphones inside that same cabin is a whole different game.

"“For years, we’ve been asked why we can’t simply adapt our noise-canceling headphone technology to vehicle cabins for a quieter driving experience,” said John Feng, Bose Automotive manager of Active Sound Management Solutions. “But we know it’s much more difficult to control noise in a large space like a car cabin compared to the relatively small area around your ears."


Attenuating more than predictable, low-frequency sound requires more powerful and expensive hardware and either lots of expensive, in-house research or licensing fees to companies like Bose. It's often cheaper to throw in an extra layer of insulation to deal with high frequencies sounds and let low-cost hardware deal with the low frequencies. Some day, it may be become more cost effective to eliminate all acoustic insulation, foam, acoustic glass, felt liners, triple door seals, etc. and just let the wind, powertrain, and tires roar as loud as they want and deal with it all electronically, but that time hasn't yet come.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,006 Posts
Well, low frequencies take significantly more power (and air movement & driver size), so I don’t buy the argument against higher freqs. Too, as I said, this was done effectively over 30 years ago by a car company.

I’ll write it off to price point issues.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
15,217 Posts
Well, low frequencies take significantly more power (and air movement & driver size), so I don’t buy the argument against higher freqs. Too, as I said, this was done effectively over 30 years ago by a car company.

I’ll write it off to price point issues.
Low frequencies are also easier to deal with because they're less directional. You can place a subwoofer almost anywhere - under the dash, under a seat, in a side rear panel, in a package tray, in a trunk, or even inside the spare tire's wheel and the sound will fill the entire cabin - you can hear and feel bass, but can't really determine where it is originating. Higher frequencies are very directional so the drivers need to be placed strategically.

I did some light research on Google this morning and the best I could find is that the 1992 Nissan Bluebird was the first automobile sold with active noise cancelation. Articles state that the effect was limited and it only attenuated low-frequency engine noise using drivers placed under the seats. I didn't see any sources referencing Lotus.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
423 Posts
If only ANC could fix the vibrations and 'sounds like it is running on some 83 octane from the local quik-mart' chatter...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,768 Posts
I'm not looking to do this but how would the sound from a modified exhaust system or intakes like the Magnaflow & AEM "cold air" intake be effected by the ANC?
 

·
Registered
'20 BE w/Skid Plates, Upgraded Stereo
Joined
·
41 Posts
Just adding to the discussion, ANC can be disabled by either

  • Removing the source microphones via cutting wires at the mic
  • Removing the source microphones via disconnecting the mics at the ANC module's input connector
For those interested, disconnecting the ANC's input connector takes about 10m. The ANC module is located behind and slightly above the glove box. It's silver and about the size of a deck of cards. The brown connector is behind the box, but accessible to disconnect by hand.



SVC is disabled via the Head Unit for those models that have the 8" Head Unit. I'm not sure if SVC exists on models without that Head Unit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,006 Posts
I didn't see any sources referencing Lotus.
Top hit of my first search that included “Lotus” was an article from 2009 talking about Lotus’ patent on this kind of system. I didn’t run any other searches.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,006 Posts
Okay, I ran one more search and found reference to Lotus having an active noise cancelling system in 1990, and Mazda people having written some sort of paper describing either that system or a very similar one in about 1994.
 

·
Registered
2019 RTL-E (white on beige) in central Texas
Joined
·
1,813 Posts
SVC is disabled via the Head Unit for those models that have the 8" Head Unit. I'm not sure if SVC exists on models without that Head Unit.
Yes, and can be disabled, per the PDF Owner's manual page #212 (PDF page 214) "Adjusting the Sound" (5" screen Color Audio System).
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top