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So I just got my Ridgeline and love the truck. The main issue I have is the transmission or what I thought was the transmission. The more I read the forums, YouTube videos etc. It seems like it’s more than likely VCM vibration I’m feeling. Are there any other issues besides worse MPG by disabling VCM? Which disabled is the “best” as far as reliability and drive ability?

I see it’s altering the coolant temperature to the PCM, which I hope and assume the coolant fan is on its own switch to not cause an issue. Does the coolant gauge read lower than it should? Any advice is appreciated.
 

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I believe since it "tricks" the coolant sensor to a lower reading the ECU never sees the engine warm up. And I believe it keeps the fuel mixture too rich. VCM is ingrained in the engine. I see other sensor affect on my scantool
 

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So I just got my Ridgeline and love the truck. The main issue I have is the transmission or what I thought was the transmission. The more I read the forums, YouTube videos etc. It seems like it’s more than likely VCM vibration I’m feeling. Are there any other issues besides worse MPG by disabling VCM? Which disabled is the “best” as far as reliability and drive ability?

I see it’s altering the coolant temperature to the PCM, which I hope and assume the coolant fan is on its own switch to not cause an issue. Does the coolant gauge read lower than it should? Any advice is appreciated.
Welcome to the forum. What is the model year and odometer reading of your RL? Vibration from VCM operation is not normal and could indicate a problem with the active engine mounts. If your RL is in the warranty period I would encourage you to have the dealer diagnose the source of vibration.
Edit: I see from previous posts you purchased a 2017 BE. You also mention a constant vibration at speed in previous posts. If this is the case then most likely VCM operation is not the source of your vibration symptoms as VCM switches from 6 to 3 cylinder modes based on engine loading. If this is a CPO purchase take it to Honda in to have it diagnosed.

Yes, it moves the needle on the dash just a bit lower than what it was prior I noticed. The noticeable change is the recorded temps on the Carscanner app when monitoring the coolant temps. It jumps the temps around as it's doing it's thing. Interesting how it works. View attachment 425467
It would be interesting to see the same plot with the defeat device removed to see if ECT1 is that noisey without the device.
 
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It would be interesting to see the same plot with the defeat device removed to see if ECT1 is that noisey without the device.
From the S-VCM page, I'm pretty sure the fluctuations are part of the design - basically let the computer see the real temperature from time to time to keep the gauge reading relatively accurate. Then alternately feed it the compensated coolant temp to prevent VCM from activating.

The compensation is not a constant, because on one hand it should be sufficient to keep the reading below 167F (so VCM does not activate) while the actual coolant temperature fluctuates in driving (the coolant sensor’s resistance also changes); and on the other hand, it should allow the gauge on your dash to reflect temperature fluctuations between 120F and 210F while you are driving.
It would be interesting to see other data like fuel trims, with and without the device, but considering how many people have had these devices for years, I'm thinking it's not changing those enough to cause a problem?
 

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A key here is loop status. As long as the system is in closed loop, it's relying on information from the O2 sensors rather than ECT to calculate injector pulse width to maintain the correct A/F ratio.

Modern engines like the Ridgeline's with heated, wideband O2 sensors enter closed loop relatively quickly after a cold start and can stay in closed loop under a wider range of conditions.

One possible concern with VCM-defeat devices is related to DTC's that set and/or ODB II readiness monitors that run only when certain conditions are met - such as a minimum ECT.

If ECT does not reach a minimum threshold, a DTC that relies on this may never trigger a MIL or message to alert you of a problem.
 

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I believe since it "tricks" the coolant sensor to a lower reading the ECU never sees the engine warm up. And I believe it keeps the fuel mixture too rich. VCM is ingrained in the engine. I see other sensor affect on my scantool
I thought fuel mixture was controlled by the O2 sensors, no? I observe the system entering “Closed Loop” within seconds of startup.👌

I see virtually no difference in the factory needle position post disabler install. Factory needle still starts moving at 130F actual coolant temp and stops moving at 160F actual coolant temp…..with/without VCM disabler installed. No negatives here, other than scan tool does show fake ECT….in my case constant 161F-163F. A second ECT gauge is a way around fake ECT displaying.
 

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The RL has a wideband O2 sensor? That's interesting. I wonder why (Honda) switched from narrow to wide. That would have been extremely useful 20 years ago...
The Ridgeline has used wideband O2 sensors since it was introduced in 2005. They've been standard across the industry for years. Hondas has been using them since them since the '92 Civic VX with the lean-burn engine.
 

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The Ridgeline has used wideband O2 sensors since it was introduced in 2005. They've been standard across the industry for years. Hondas has been using them since them since the '92 Civic VX with the lean-burn engine.
Odd, my 93 Civic Ex had a narrowband. I had to switch it out for a PLX wideband to tune.

I thought fuel mixture was controlled by the O2 sensors, no? I observe the system entering “Closed Loop” within seconds of startup.👌
Only once its "warmed up" (predetermined sensor settings, temp, etc). In open loop the ECU relies on pre-calibrated fuel tables. Maybe not as relevant in the newer vehicles.
 

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Only once its "warmed up" (predetermined sensor settings, temp, etc). In open loop the ECU relies on pre-calibrated fuel tables. Maybe not as relevant in the newer vehicles.
So closed loop is only entered once the engine is “warmed up”????
 

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A key here is loop status. As long as the system is in closed loop, it's relying on information from the O2 sensors rather than ECT to calculate injector pulse width to maintain the correct A/F ratio.

Modern engines like the Ridgeline's with heated, wideband O2 sensors enter closed loop relatively quickly after a cold start and can stay in closed loop under a wider range of conditions.

One possible concern with VCM-defeat devices is related to DTC's that set and/or ODB II readiness monitors that run only when certain conditions are met - such as a minimum ECT.

If ECT does not reach a minimum threshold, a DTC that relies on this may never trigger a MIL or message to alert you of a problem.
ECT1 is also used to correct ignition timing. If the VCM defeat device is changing the actual ECT1 temp to a lower value, how is ignition timing impacted? Is the PCM advancing ignitiontiming in an attempt to get ECT1 up to ~ 190F?

Rectangle Font Parallel Screenshot Number
 
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So closed loop is only entered once the engine is “warmed up”????
From the service information:

Air fuel ratio control stops feedback under the following conditions in order to maintain operational performance and catalytic protection.
  • When starting the engine or during fuel increase after the engine is started
  • While the engine coolant is cold
  • During fuel increase under high load
  • During fuel increase at high engine speed
  • During fuel cut-off at deceleration
Unfortunately, no specific values are given for any of these conditions.
 

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So closed loop is only entered once the engine is “warmed up”????
Closed loop is entered when the pre-determined engine conditions are meet. Usually that is coolant temp, MAF readings, etc. It could be different for each engine and I'm sure much different now, than my tuning experience from the 90s :)
 
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