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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A long long time ago I used to do all of my mechanic work. Back than I had a some serious rides, A 66 GTO, then moved to a couple of Datsun Z cars the last being a 72 240 that was a blast. I also heavily modified it (full racing cam, headers, lowered, racing shocks, 280 block, racing clutch and on and on). It took up a lot of my time working on it. Then one day when something broke and I thought "why am I spending so much money and time on this car?" Within a month the car was traded on a new B210 hatchback (what a change, lol) that got over 40 mpg and was one of the most dependable cars I've ever owned.

But except for changing a battery or 2 and some simple things I haven't turned a wrench on a car since.

But reading about all the tinkering and repairs that people do here and hw much money is saved has got me thinking it's time to try my hand at it again.

So after all that, other than a good basic set of metrics, what other tools should I look into?
 

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If you're going to change the timing belt, you'll want a crankshaft bolt tool, along with a hefty air wrench.

But otherwise, the Ridgeline generally doesn't need any special tools to do general maintenance.

Chip H.
 

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I am not sure what you mean about "special?"

You would need (or at least really want):

ramps
jack stands
floor jack
torque wrench(s)
strap wrench or similar or oil filter removal
catch pans
container(s) for used oil etc
breaker bar
wide range of extensions
wide range of regular and deep metric sockets
sawzall (etc) for cutting things that won't come apart
OEM REPAIR MANUAL
Fluid changing pumps (useful for VTM4 change and transfer case, 1 for each)
I am sure there are more that I didn't think of . . .

I have a whole bunch of other tools, including impact wrenchs. For doing the "heavy duty" jobs like suspension, brakes, CVs, even wheel removal, having impact tools makes the job SO much easier. I have a 3/8"and a beastly 1/2" 20v cordless impact drivers from Dewalt which are great tools. The 1/2" one will remove axle / crank bolts like they were nothing . . .

Have fun!
 

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Most of my tools were inherited from my grandfather who was a general automotive mechanic that his own one-man shop for many years. There are lots of Craftsman, Snap-On, and Proto tools in both SAE and metric (which everything now uses a combination of both). There were also lots of manufacturer-specific specialty tools that are now obsolete for anything made in the last few decades. I still have a decent selection of basic hand and pneumatic tools, but I'll still occasionally pick up something to make a job easier. As vehicles have become more reliable with less maintenance and with the frequency at which I trade, my tools see very little use. I'm still using a 20-gallon Sears air compressor that my grandfather bought new over 30 years ago - with the original belt that is in perfect condition! Eurban covered the basic stuff pretty well - at least for maintenance items. Repairs - particularly those involving electrical components or engine/transmission removal - really need manufacturer-specific tools which can get very expensive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
ramps - Check
jack stands- Knew I should have kept those
floor jack-Check
torque wrench(s)-Guess a 40 year old one should be replaced. (old pointing needle style)
strap wrench or similar or oil filter removal-Check
catch pans-Check
container(s) for used oil etc- guess I'm going green
breaker bar- Guess that's not a crowbar
wide range of extensions- currently scattered around the garage
wide range of regular and deep metric sockets- I'll find them with the extensions
sawzall (etc) for cutting things that won't come apart-Fathers day is coming!
OEM REPAIR MANUAL-need that

One thing I can do is drive to my in laws. Father in law is a retired heavy duty equipment mechanic. (Bulldozers etc.)
He has a huge shop on his 40 acre farm and 3 of everything. Hmmm....

I'll probably replace everything so it will be organized. Might need a decent tool box. I have one but it's so un organized
 

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Your torque wrench is fine, as long as there isn't any corrosion on it (would weaken the pointer bar, giving incorrect readings). If it sits at zero with no load, and it's not rusty, keep it.

Chip H.
 

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Make sure you have a large assortment of 10mm wrenches and sockets. Mine disappear with regularity. None can be found if I start a project, otherwise I trip all over them. Don't have this problem with others....

A torque wrench calibrated in in/lbs.

Spark plug socket(s) that still have the rubber insert inside to retain the plug.
 
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