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The width is good where you can lay it down flat with and open the tailgate. My concern is it sliding out. There are 4 tie hooks at the rear of the bed and I'm thinking maybe you can use those with straps to secure the plywood from sliding out?

Anyone successfully moved some plywood using the truck bed and can share how they strapped it down? Is there a hitch bed extender maybe?

I suppose you can have the tailgate up and the plywood leans against it like other trucks, but I'm concerned that might damage the tailgate with enough weight especially since the tailgate is designed to open like a door. I always ended up slightly damaging the tailgate with weight in my past trucks so want to avoid this. Suppose it would be okay if it's one piece, but certainly not many. It would be easier to load/unload if it was flat, especially drywall. Other trucks had bulky wheel wells so you couldn't lay anything flat, but this truck doesn't this was a selling point for me...I just never actually considered how to do it practically.
 

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The width is good where you can lay it down flat with and open the tailgate. My concern is it sliding out. There are 4 tie hooks at the rear of the bed and I'm thinking maybe you can use those with straps to secure the plywood from sliding out?

Anyone successfully moved some plywood using the truck bed and can share how they strapped it down? Is there a hitch bed extender maybe?

I suppose you can have the tailgate up and the plywood leans against it like other trucks, but I'm concerned that might damage the tailgate with enough weight especially since the tailgate is designed to open like a door. I always ended up slightly damaging the tailgate with weight in my past trucks so want to avoid this. Suppose it would be okay if it's one piece, but certainly not many. It would be easier to load/unload if it was flat, especially drywall. Other trucks had bulky wheel wells so you couldn't lay anything flat, but this truck doesn't this was a selling point for me...I just never actually considered how to do it practically.
Have carried flat (6-8 sheets 1/2") and propped up on the tailgate (4 sheets of 3/4"). No issues except leaving a bit of red dye stain from markings on the wood edges on the sides of the bed. Depending upon how far you are going and your driving habits, with the plywood laying flat I have gotten away with multiple bungie cords connected from the low rear tie down on one side, around the end of the plywood, connected back to the high rear tie down on the other side. Could also use a ratcheting cargo strap to do the same if going farther or concerned about the bungie cords.
 

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There are hitch-mounted bed extenders that you can use to either support the plywood, or use to block the plywood from sliding out.

You might keep a couple chunks of 4x4 or 6x6 block handy, to provide a pressure point between the plywood and the tie-down straps in the bed.
 

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I have carried (16) 4 x 8 sheets of 24/32" (3/4"). It lays flat and does well. Had the tailgate open and kept it all flat. What I did was use packing wrap (like cling wrap) and wrapped the end a few times with the end of a piece of red plastic stuffed under the wrap to act as a flag. Then two tie-down straps criss-crossed over the end attached to the tie-down anchors by the gate. Handled it wonderfully... and it was a 1/2 ton of weight.

Edit: What I forgot to mention. I had just unpacked a tool cabinet and had a large piece of 3/4" thick of Styrofoam, the timing was perfect. I threw that in the bed between the tiny wheel wells... just because. But it was unnecessary.
 

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Carried 42 sheets of 4x8 drywall with no issues. Ran straps from rear tie hooks from under to top hooks on opposite side making x pattern. Worked great.


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Carried 42 sheets of 4x8 drywall with no issues. Ran straps from rear tie hooks from under to top hooks on opposite side making x pattern. Worked great.


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What Wishfulhunter described works perfect for sheet goods....
hook one ratchet strap to bottom left, go under the sheets, up the back, over to the top to the right hook. Repeat for bottom right to top left. snug as a bug...
 

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What Wishfulhunter described works perfect for sheet goods....
hook one ratchet strap to bottom left, go under the sheets, up the back, over to the top to the right hook. Repeat for bottom right to top left. snug as a bug...
Works well, that is what I was meaning by crisscrossing above, as well... But the impressive thing to note here is 42 sheets. That's quite a payload if it was 1/2" USG ultralight that is a minimum of 1600 lbs but, more like 1800 lbs though... and were talking even more if it wasn't lightweight.
 

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Carried 42 sheets of 4x8 drywall with no issues. Ran straps from rear tie hooks from under to top hooks on opposite side making x pattern. Worked great.
This is how I've been doing it for years. It's easier in the Ridgelines because the tiedowns are so great. In a Tacoma, you've gotta put the 4 x 8 sheets up on boards that go across about halfway up the bed to clear the wheel wells. But I still tied it off the exact same way wishfulhunter describes. Sometimes with a lighter load I'll only do one side and not do the X.

The other thing is that the Ridgeline bed is somewhat grippy. But I always, always tie off my cargo. I just don't want to ever be responsible for getting someone hurt.
 
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The other thing is that the Ridgeline bed is somewhat grippy. But I always, always tie off my cargo. I just don't want to ever be responsible for getting someone hurt.


Im not sure I agree with that statement. My G2 bed seems to be over slick as everything slides everywhere. The Titan I traded in had this rough sandpaper feeling stuff sprayed in the bed that came from the dealer....loved that bed cause nothing slid in it.


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Im not sure I agree with that statement. My G2 bed seems to be over slick as everything slides everywhere. The Titan I traded in had this rough sandpaper feeling stuff sprayed in the bed that came from the dealer....loved that bed cause nothing slid in it.


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When was the last time you had a ridged plastic bedliner? That's my point of comparison. It's what I had in my last three trucks (Toyotas). I bought rubber bed mats for all three. That was incredibly grippy. I judge the Ridgeline to be somewhere between the two. And in the interest of saving the half inch of cargo space under the tonneau, I decided to forgo getting a rubber bed mat. If I'd put it this way you probably might have understood: it's grippy for a plastic bed.
 

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Like others, no problem with drywall or plywood with the cris-crossing from the lower rear tie downs to the trailer hitch rings. If you are worried about liftoff another strap across the front lower tie downs works great. The bed + tailgate is long enough that I didn't worry about chipping or bending the 8ft sheeetrock, 10ft might be a bit iffy though

I did have a problem with a piece of 4x8 laminate (for a countertop) - it is just too thin and light and becomes an instant sail, and too fragile on the edges to really tie down well. I stopped about 4 times in 8 miles to try to figure it out, and it didn't help that it was a very windy day. I would have had the same problem even if it had an 8 ft bed, next time I'll bring or purchase some 2x4s at the same time to give me something solid to strap it with. I did get it home without damage, even though at one point I could see in the rearview that it was completely curled over
 

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I did have a problem with a piece of 4x8 laminate (for a countertop) - it is just too thin and light and becomes an instant sail, and too fragile on the edges to really tie down well. I stopped about 4 times in 8 miles to try to figure it out, and it didn't help that it was a very windy day.
I bet the bed net would work for you. Albeit, it is pricey. I have it and used it before I purchased the tonneau cover. It's actually good for that type of thing because when stretched and attached to the lower hooks it nets out FLAT and barely rests on the bottom. I hauled rigid foam insulation sheets that way.
 

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I bet the bed net would work for you. Albeit, it is pricey. I have it and used it before I purchased the tonneau cover. It's actually good for that type of thing because when stretched and attach to the lower hooks it nets out FLAT and barely rests on the bottom. I hauled rigid foam insulation sheets that way.

I'll have to try that out since the net is on my "to buy" list. That is the first time that I bought laminate on its own - usually I get the MDF at the same time.
 

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having some doubts about 40 sheets of drywall


I had 42 sheets. That was 21 pieces as there are two sheets to a piece. Suspension was squatted but I took it easy and the truck didn't fail me one bit. I wouldn't do it on a daily basis though!


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I use my GenI for construction work and carry all manners of building materials all the time. For 4x8 sheetgoods, I leave the tailgate closed if it is just a few sheets (still use a ratchet strap straight across the top) or lay them flat if its more. I have done about 30 sheets of drywall but the truck certainly could handle more if needed. I typically use one ratchet strap straight across for lateral stability and then one over / under the end to keep things from sliding out. It can be surprising how easily things can slip out the back of the bed under abrupt acceleration if they are not secured properly.

If I am carrying something fragile and floppy like a 4x8 sheet of laminate, I would likely buy a sacrificial sheet of some sort (or two) of cheap plywood to lay it on (or sandwich it between). Something like painters tape can be used to temporarily hold the laminate to the supporting board underneath.

Bottom line is that the Ridge (GenI anyway)is a lot tougher than most people realize. You bought a truck! Don't be afraid to use it like one!

Here's a pic that another member posted a few years ago. The vehicle is technically WAY overloaded (and the tie down method dreadful, hopefully they were just getting started) but apparently got the job done without issue . . .

PS: For the pictured load (ignoring that it is WAY heavy) I would first use a ratchet strap straight across on top of the drywall load to cinch it down. Then a "strangle" wrap around the overhanging materials to keep individual items from coming loose, followed by ratcheting down the box on top with a separate strap. I can then tie the excess strap of the strangle wrap to a convenient spot on the tailgate opening to ensure that the whole business doesn't slide out. Always add more straps if you are worried!
 

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