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The AWD analysis is incorrect. The Ridgeline is a FWD that has the ability to apply pressure to clutches in the rear end when the computer detects 'too much' wheel slip. This is conceptually very similar to what Subaru has used in many of its A/T vehicles for decades.
Please don't spread misinformation. You are 100% incorrect. Do yourself a favor and Google iVTM-4. This is the AWD system in the Ridgeline, Passport, and Pilot. It is also mechanically the same as AWD system in many Acura vehicles. It is not, and I repeat: NOT just a FWD that activates the rear on slip.

Just in case you don't feel like googling it, here are two good videos on it.

Please don't act like you know something when you don't. Being wrong is okay. But being so ignorant that you can't recognize when you're wrong, that's unacceptable in my line of work.
 

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This site has excellent info on the Ridgeline drive system, if you’ll read it and try to understand.

The Gen II Ridge works exactly like the Gen I, though it’s better in that it can push more torque through the rear clutch packs. There is a driveshaft that’s sends power to the rear end at all times. The transfer gear which drives the rear end slightly over-drives it, but once the power gets to the rear end, it goes exactly nowhere until or unless the computer energizes one or both of the clutch packs. Those clutch packs are what couple the rear wheels to the drive power coming rearward. This is how Honda is able to claims that the Ridgeline is able to send 100% of torque to the front wheels; there’s nothing going through to the rear wheels until the computer sends power to the clutches to couple in the rear axles (wheels).

In the Subarus I mentioned, the decoupling clutch pack is at the back of the tranny rather than in the rear end, and the rear end is a conventional differential (often with a viscous limited-slip clutch pack in it).

Honda claims the Ridgeline AWD system is an ‘active’ one mainly because Ridgelines start moving from a stop with the rear clutch packs engaged, and release clamping force on the packs as you gain speed. Within certain non-specified ‘high torque’ situations the computer also automatically engages the clutches to some degree, but that’s about all you can count on in terms of the rear wheels getting drive power until there’s some dynamic reason for the computer to send power there.

If you’re going to prate about ignorance, you should try a lot harder to understand the subject matter

Moderator edited. No need for the first line.
 

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OK fellas, let's keep it civil.

FTR, unless I've been mis-informed over the last 14+ years of VTM-4 ownership, the VTM-4 and iVTM-4 are similar in operation with the i-VTM4 being able to torque vector side-to-side which the VTM-4 system cannot do. Both are over-driven, but by different amounts. Just as @bulwnkl said. I'm not sure of the distinction @gravis86 is trying to make.

So yes, the Ridgeline (both G1 and G2) are basically front wheel drive, rear wheel assist as determined by the computer except for initial start and when manual VTM-4 lock is engaged.

I'm open to learning new things about both systems. So if I'm missing something, please elaborate. ;)
 

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This site has excellent info on the Ridgeline drive system, if you’ll read it and try to understand.

The Gen II Ridge works exactly like the Gen I, though it’s better in that it can push more torque through the rear clutch packs. There is a driveshaft that’s sends power to the rear end at all times. The transfer gear which drives the rear end slightly over-drives it, but once the power gets to the rear end, it goes exactly nowhere until or unless the computer energizes one or both of the clutch packs. Those clutch packs are what couple the rear wheels to the drive power coming rearward. This is how Honda is able to claims that the Ridgeline is able to send 100% of torque to the front wheels; there’s nothing going through to the rear wheels until the computer sends power to the clutches to couple in the rear axles (wheels).

In the Subarus I mentioned, the decoupling clutch pack is at the back of the tranny rather than in the rear end, and the rear end is a conventional differential (often with a viscous limited-slip clutch pack in it).

Honda claims the Ridgeline AWD system is an ‘active’ one mainly because Ridgelines start moving from a stop with the rear clutch packs engaged, and release clamping force on the packs as you gain speed. Within certain non-specified ‘high torque’ situations the computer also automatically engages the clutches to some degree, but that’s about all you can count on in terms of the rear wheels getting drive power until there’s some dynamic reason for the computer to send power there.

If you’re going to prate about ignorance, you should try a lot harder to understand the subject matter

Moderator edited. No need for the first line.
I'm fully aware of the mechanical differences between the Subaru and the Ridgeline. And you're spot on, except for one thing you didn't really talk about: software.

The Subaru system is mechanically operated, meaning it is fully-FWD until the front spins faster than the rear, causing the viscous coupling to close and turning the vehicle into AWD. What this means is that in most scenarios it will always be FWD only.

In the Ridgeline, it's all software controlled. Yes, both of the clutch packs in the rear can open at the same time, turning the Ridgeline into a FWD vehicle. But Honda has said (repeatedly) that this is not the default for the vehicle. This is why I won't call it FWD. The default is for it to send power to the rear. How much, we won't know because that AWD logic is proprietary to Honda and they won't share it. All they have shared is that FWD is not the default mode. Therefore, I will not put it in the same category as the Outback and I will not call it FWD.

From my understanding (and this is just my understanding, so I don't know it to be factually correct) the scenarios in which the Gen II Ridgeline would open both rear clutch packs (making it FWD) are similar to the scenarios in which VCM shuts off half of the cylinders. Meaning basically only on the highway and when you aren't really pressing the accelerator that hard. In most situations, it would still be AWD. Just as we wouldn't call it a three-cylinder that becomes a six-cylinder under "certain scenarios" because we know it defaults to six cylinders, I won't call it a FWD vehicle that becomes AWD under "certain scenarios" because I know it to default to AWD.

One of the advantages of the Honda system (besides being able to overdrive the rear and control each rear wheel individually) is that is does not need to wait for the front to lose traction in order to send power to the rear. And that's a HUGE difference.

Clearly you know more about the mechanics of the Ridgeline system than I thought you did, and I apologize for calling you ignorant. I misunderstood you, just as I think you misunderstood me. We both know the hardware well. It's just our understanding of the software that differs. I believe what Honda has told us, in the it does not default to FWD and therefore I will not refer to it as FWD.

As a mechanical engineer who has dabbled in software engineering as well, I have actually designed and built (prototype) AWD systems for electric vehicles (autonomous robotics, not road vehicles) and I feel that I fully understand the relationship between software and hardware, and the importance of both.

I hope I've shed some light on our disagreement/misunderstanding.
 

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If accelerating, turning, or any time any wheel slip is detected (like rain, snow) the rear twin shafts are turning, AWD most of the time. Freeway cruising, like cruise control engaged, the AWD system will turn it into FWD for economy. As soon as you get back on the throttle, turn, wheel slip, anything, AWD/rear half shafts are moving. So it's AWD any time AWD is needed, and FWD when FWD is all that is required. It is a modern AWD system, complicated and highly effective. It can detect wheel spin faster than a mechanical only setup. I forgot how many samples it takes a second but it's milliseconds to engage and always ready to engage like said example above when steady state cruising in a straight line. I've pushed this AWD system and truck about as hard as can be, taking it to my twisties and beating on it. The AWD system is so similar the GKN Twinster AWD system in my Focus RS, it's hard to tell the systems apart. You can feel it shift power to the outside rear wheel in hard turning, feel it grip, and slightly oversteer. This AWD system is highly underrated.
 

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Since you opened the door to credentials and to satisfy my curiosity, are you a PE?
Nope. I don't hold that license.

As a matter of fact, I don't even work as one currently... My current job as of a little over a year ago is programming and machining in the aerospace industry.
 

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I will add that the VTM on my '03 Pilot starts off in 4WD. The ECU progressively dis-engages the rear diff clutches until the drive shaft/propeller is running free when 18 mph is reached, making it FWD.
Confused?
 

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I believe I understand what everyone is talking about now. Your explanation is similar to page 7 for the 2010. And the update for the 2G is I-VTM4, which sends torque to the rear wheels just like 1G, but can now send different amounts of torque to each rear wheel when needed.
Thanks
: ^ )
2dogsscratchingtheirheads1sleepingcat
Had a G1 for 8+ years (loved it), got the G2 about 6 weeks ago (love it ), and pretty quickly felt like the G2 has little more rear-wheel bias - nothing dramatic, but it feels good.
 

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I'm not so sure...
I kind of prefer the set up on my old Toyota. It had levers that allow one to choose; in/out, high/low, & 5 speed manual. :ROFLMAO: I had a lot of fun drifting it in the snow. The '03 Pilot will drift too. But as I spend time on this forum I'm learning the new (to me) generation won't be as easy.
 

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I'm not so sure...
I kind of prefer the set up on my old Toyota. It had levers that allow one to choose; in/out, high/low, & 5 speed manual. :ROFLMAO: I had a lot of fun drifting it in the snow. The '03 Pilot will drift too. But as I spend time on this forum I'm learning the new (to me) generation won't be as easy.
I did like the ability to lock my G1 into 4wd in 1st, 2nd or reverse. Didn't need it often, but liked to make that decision before ascending a slippery hill.
 

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I'm not so sure...
I kind of prefer the set up on my old Toyota. It had levers that allow one to choose; in/out, high/low, & 5 speed manual. :ROFLMAO: I had a lot of fun drifting it in the snow. The '03 Pilot will drift too. But as I spend time on this forum I'm learning the new (to me) generation won't be as easy.
4WD is a pain in the snow/ice. Its common in winter to have patches of snow/ice at lights and stops, and dry pavement further down the road. You are constantly switching in and out of 4WD since you cannot be in 4WD on dry pavement while turning. AWD is all the time, so no need to switch in/out of anything. One of the reasons I got rid of my tacoma and purchased the ridgeline.
 

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@High Desert NM I had a '14 OB for 4 years before I got quote for 6k of replacements for rusted out control arms and other misc undercarriage decay. Decided to look around after that at crossovers/midsize trucks (wanted 3-5k towing + ability to carry 4 adults comfortably) and settled on the RL. Couple various notes between the two:

-I actually find the RL backseat to be more comfortable than the OB due to the seating position.

- Backseat can hold way more cargo/is more versatile due to the folding seats. Found with the OB I always had things rolling around plus it had the center hump along the floor.

-RL trunk is way more useful than the back of the OB for the above reason

-I do some light offroading (beach driving/mountain roads, etc) every few months and haven't had an issue with the RL. Bought a skidplate from another user on here (@Venphic) and that will definitely give me a bit more piece of mind. I wouldn't take either of them to MOAB, but I think they're both fine for the level of off-roading I see myself doing.

-Mileage is actually about the same. my '14 OB was before they made substantial MPG improvements (now I think the 2.4L is 25/32) but with a tonneau I can get ~20 city and ~28-30 highway depending on the conditions.

-RL with a removable cover on the bed + locking tailgate has a lot more hauling capabilities than the OB.

-New OBs have much better infotainment systems, but with apple carplay on my RTL-E it's not a big deal.

-Seat warmers on the RL do leave something to be desired.

-Styling of the new OBs are definitely "sportier" than the G2 RLs, but with a few minor enhancements you can definitely "beef" up the look of the RL. Didn't really bother me but does for some people.

DM me if you have any more questions!
 

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@High Desert NM
-Mileage is actually about the same. my '14 OB was before they made substantial MPG improvements (now I think the 2.4L is 25/32) but with a tonneau I can get ~20 city and ~28-30 highway depending on the conditions.
Just FYI, you shouldn't trust your trip computers MPG numbers. It exaggerates significantly.
 

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Just FYI, you shouldn't trust your trip computers MPG numbers. It exaggerates significantly.
Yeah, I know. But are we sure Subaru’s wasn’t doing the same thing? My overall MPG in the OB was ~22.5, right now in RL it’s ~ 21.7 with the same mix of city/highway driving.
 

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Yeah, I know. But are we sure Subaru’s wasn’t doing the same thing? My overall MPG in the OB was ~22.5, right now in RL it’s ~ 21.7 with the same mix of city/highway driving.
I don't know if the Subaru's computer exaggerates and if so how much. According to the Fuelly the Gen II Ridgeline averages around 20.5 mpg while the 14 Outback averages around 24.5 so thats a 4mpg difference in favor of the outback.

Was your Subaru a V6? I don't know Outbacks but that Fuelly number is for all 2014 Outbacks so it may be a combination of the 4 and 6 cylinder models. . . . Figure your actual Ridgeline MPG is between 1.5 and 2mpg lower than what the trip computer reports.
 

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I don't know if the Subaru's computer exaggerates and if so how much. According to the Fuelly the Gen II Ridgeline averages around 20.5 mpg while the 14 Outback averages around 24.5 so thats a 4mpg difference in favor of the outback.

Was your Subaru a V6? I don't know Outbacks but that Fuelly number is for all 2014 Outbacks so it may be a combination of the 4 and 6 cylinder models. . . . Figure your actual Ridgeline MPG is between 1.5 and 2mpg lower than what the trip computer reports.
Shouldn’t an AWD wagon/SUV that’s 800 lbs lighter get at least 4 more mpg than a Ridgeline?
 

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Just my experience, definitely wouldn’t expect those results across the board for either vehicle.

I did, however, find that my OB didn’t get great highway MPG at anything above 70mph due to the somewhat underpowered V4. Typically would get around 25 highway.

With a tonneau, I can typically get at least 25 if not closer to 30 MPG highway. Even -1/1.5 for overestimated computer, still is the same or better than my OB.

At the end of the day, I think the fact that it’s in the same ballpark as the OB is a plus for the RL.
 
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