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All of the Ridgelines have backup cameras I thought. Maybe your post is getting lost in translation to me. ...
For the Gen1, only 2009-2012 RTL (with nav) and all 2013-2014 models came with factory backup cameras. All other Gen1s could get an OEM accessory backup camera installed at the dealer; but the OEM accessory backup camera was kind of ugly, if you ask me.

Reference:
Gen1 OEM accessory backup camera
 

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He has a G1. I mentioned the option of upgrading the tech on the G1 vs going for the G2 to get the tech already installed oem. I estimated on the high side, not knowing what going labor rates are for this kind of work (i would just do it myself).
Ah I see. That's my fault I guess for not knowing it was a gen 1 discussion. Yeah, the cost efficient route would be to buy a new headunit and install a backup cam.
 

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Back to the original question
"Consumers just aren't responding to the Ridgeline"
I've had an R1 since Aug 2005. Currently a 2013 with 105k miles. I think the mistake Honda made was to call the RL a "Truck". THe only thing "truck" about it is the bed. It should have been called something like "Extreme Utility Vehicle" ie XUV or EUV. It would have been at the top of its class instead of constantly being compared to trucks that are not in its class. I purchased my first one because I hated trucks and was impressed with it's multi-purposeness. No need for the obligatory tool box or bed liner cause they are integral. RIdes better than a truck, has better traction than a truck and its available full time, not just when you are in trouble. My advice to Honda is to reclassify it. It will never compete with the "American truck", it is too light, too comfortable, too useful. I haven't upgraded because Honda left the most important feature for me off...paddle shifters and removed two of the most useful features...space in front of the console and the uselessness of the new rear window. All if favor of speakers in the bed???? I use the rear window and space between the front seats to carry 2x4's, pipes, and rails. THe rear window in the middle of the rear glass is useless and the shifter took up the space between the seats. I don't like the new looks, but that wouldn't stop me from upgrading if other things were addressed. The remaining dissapointment is the 100k mile timing belt issue. 100k is nothing these days. I'm not bitter, but disappointed in Honda. I love the original RL concept, maybe on of the few.
 

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There are thousands of Chevy's, Dodge's, Toyota's, Nissan's, etc, you see them everywhere you go, almost every drive way has one. Now Ridgeline? Well, we don't want a vehicle in which our neighbor(s) are likely to have the very same one. We enjoy being unique and driving a somewhat unique vehicle which is why owning a Ridgeline is so much fun and gratifying. See a Silverado? A Ram? A Tacoma? Ho-hum! But you can go for literally days, maybe weeks, without spying a Ridgeline ,so it is some what exciting when we do!

We hope that the Ridgeline remains as popular in the future as it is today!

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter #185
Back to the original question
"Consumers just aren't responding to the Ridgeline"
I've had an R1 since Aug 2005. Currently a 2013 with 105k miles. I think the mistake Honda made was to call the RL a "Truck". THe only thing "truck" about it is the bed. It should have been called something like "Extreme Utility Vehicle" ie XUV or EUV. It would have been at the top of its class instead of constantly being compared to trucks that are not in its class. I purchased my first one because I hated trucks and was impressed with it's multi-purposeness. No need for the obligatory tool box or bed liner cause they are integral. RIdes better than a truck, has better traction than a truck and its available full time, not just when you are in trouble. My advice to Honda is to reclassify it. It will never compete with the "American truck", it is too light, too comfortable, too useful. I haven't upgraded because Honda left the most important feature for me off...paddle shifters and removed two of the most useful features...space in front of the console and the uselessness of the new rear window. All if favor of speakers in the bed???? I use the rear window and space between the front seats to carry 2x4's, pipes, and rails. THe rear window in the middle of the rear glass is useless and the shifter took up the space between the seats. I don't like the new looks, but that wouldn't stop me from upgrading if other things were addressed. The remaining dissapointment is the 100k mile timing belt issue. 100k is nothing these days. I'm not bitter, but disappointed in Honda. I love the original RL concept, maybe on of the few.
It's not hard to be the winner in a category with only one entry. :)

As far as placing it into an existing category, "mid-size pickup" seems to be the most appropriate in terms of dimensions and capability.

It really doesn't fit in the "sport utility truck" category which includes the Avalanche, Explorer Sport Trac, and Hummer H3T since those are BOF and RWD...and all discontinued. :)
 

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No matter how you slice it, it's a Pilot with a bed with zero competitors. It all starts from the Pilot. Yes, it can be argued it's a "truck" because it has a bed but to me this is a bit of a leap. It doesn't have a transfer case and a longitudinally mounted engine/transmission on a traditional frame. In fact, IMO it has more in common wit a minivan than a truck, folks don't like to hear this but it's the truth. Now, with definitions/classifications aside the question is how this niche vehicle fills your needs. For me, I like the AWD traction without having to hit any buttons. The ride is definitely smooth but I don't think something that a truck buyer looking for.. This is probably why Honda doesn't go out of it's way to compare the RL to other Midsizers. If sheet goods could fit into the Pilot I'd have that one.
 

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I gotta grin because it seems that I have heard most of this discussion before, forty some years before, when I owned an El Camino! ;)

Bill
 

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... It really doesn't fit in the "sport utility truck" category which includes the Avalanche, Explorer Sport Trac, and Hummer H3T since those are BOF and RWD...and all discontinued. :)
The Gen1 is probably more in the SUT category then the Gen2, with it's slightly longer and more conventional style bed-sides.

I didn't know what it was called then, but when I was shopping for a truck to replace my Ram, I was focused on the Avalanche, Ridgeline, and Sport Trac due to the fact I did not need a massive bed--I could always put the tailgate down if I needed more room--and I needed something more compact than a full-size truck to get around DC and parking garages.

I loved the mid-gate of the Avalanche bit it was just too big and squared handling on the road. The Sport Trac's cabin was too claustrophobic for my big butt. The Ridgeline turned out to be the right size, although I need a little more towing capacity (6,000 lbs would be nice). However, my 2009 RTL handles my 5,700 lbs boat trailer (wet) just fine given I have only one or no passengers--if I pull that trailer with five people in the cab, it's too much for my RL to handle (i.e. the transmission hunts for gears like a crazy person).
 

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Yes, it can be argued it's a "truck" because it has a bed but to me this is a bit of a leap. It doesn't have a transfer case and a longitudinally mounted engine/transmission on a traditional frame.
Since when did the definition of a truck require anything more than a vehicle with a cargo bed?

Many of the Ridgeline's mid-sized competitors have a transfer case and a longitudinally mounted engine/transmission on a traditional frame, but they would be hard pressed to easily carry 5 sheets of drywall from point A to point B. Which one is the "real" truck then.
 

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Since when did the definition of a truck require anything more than a vehicle with a cargo bed?

Many of the Ridgeline's mid-sized competitors have a transfer case and a longitudinally mounted engine/transmission on a traditional frame, but they would be hard pressed to easily carry 5 sheets of drywall from point A to point B. Which one is the "real" truck then.
You can cherry pick aspects to support you argument and by your definition a lawnmower with a bed on it could be called a truck, can't deny that from your macro perspective. If you had a checklist of components and checked off the boxes it's a Pilot with a bed but ahh since Websters says it's truck if it has a bed then in your world you have a truck. When you use words like "real" IMO that's just childish language. To me it's about functionality and purpose of which the RL is pretty dialed in for my needs.but at the end of day, it's a Pilot with a bed.[/QUOTE]
 

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To me it's about functionality and purpose of which the RL is pretty dialed in for my needs.but at the end of day, it's a Pilot with a bed.
[/QUOTE]

I really cannot explain the specifics, but when we test drove the pilot, it had an inferior ride and did not instill the confidence as the Ridgeline does. So, I cannot agree that the Ridgeline is simply a Pilot with a bed, it is much better and it's own ride!

Bill
 

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I really cannot explain the specifics, but when we test drove the pilot, it had an inferior ride and did not instill the confidence as the Ridgeline does. So, I cannot agree that the Ridgeline is simply a Pilot with a bed, it is much better and it's own ride!

Bill
It's probably the longer wheelbase of the Ridgeline that gives you the supervisor ride and sense of stability over the Pilot.
 

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Well, the Pilot is based off the Ridgeline, not the other way around, but that may just be semantics. It just so happened that Honda wanted to debut the MDX on the new platform first, and then the Pilot fit into the product cycle timeline, so Ridgeline was relegated to third debut.

Anyway, it might be more correct to say the Pilot is a Ridgeline with an enclosed bed, and lighter components in the chassis.

I think we can all agree that it serves all of the purposes of a mid-size pickup truck, but with the ride, comfort and driving dynamics of a long-wheelbase unibody SUV.
 

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Discussion Starter #194
@14v6, if Hyundai makes the Santa Cruz and Volkswagen makes the Tarok and Ford makes the Transit Connect-based vehicle with an open bed - all FWD-biased, unibody vehicles with transverse engines like the Ridgeline - what would you classify them as?
 

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I didn't read through this whole thing, but it seems some here are hung up on the definition of a truck. A truck to me is something that can haul things in an open bed arrangement. The RL does that. Case closed. Perfect vehicle for probably the majority of non commercial truck owners.

Heck, in the 60s, the vast majority of trucks were all 2WD. Nobody thought they weren't a truck. They had a bed and they hauled stuff in the box. The RL footprint is the same size as the old trucks I'm referring too.
 

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Heck, in the 60s, the vast majority of trucks were all 2WD. Nobody thought they weren't a truck. They had a bed and they hauled stuff in the box. The RL footprint is the same size as the old trucks I'm referring too.
And no transfer case either!

Also, the G1 RL is based off the MDX. The first PIlot came out in MY 2003 ( we had a 2004 before the 2006 Pilot) and the first RL came out in MY 2006. So I hardly think the Pilot is based off the Ridgeline. The G2 RL is based off the G3 Pilot... I believe it's fair to say... at least from the rear of the cabin forward. It will remain a P'up to me. ;)

Personally, the RL is a truck to me. It more closely matches my older Tacoma and T100 than it does the Pilot in appearance and utility. But it is almost functionally the same as the Pilot in that they both have exactly the same maintenance requirements and only differ in air filter part numbers and sizes. Otherwise, they take the same trans fluid and schedule, the same VTM-4 fluid and schedule, the same oil filter, oil and schedule, etc. and have identical operating characteristics.
 

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Discussion Starter #197
Isn't saying the Ridgeline is "not a real truck" like saying the Civic Type R is "not a real sports car" because it has front wheel drive or that a Cadillac CT6 is "not a real luxury car" because it has a unibody?
 

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I didn't read through this whole thing, but it seems some here are hung up on the definition of a truck. A truck to me is something that can haul things in an open bed arrangement. The RL does that. Case closed. Perfect vehicle for probably the majority of non commercial truck owners.

Heck, in the 60s, the vast majority of trucks were all 2WD. Nobody thought they weren't a truck. They had a bed and they hauled stuff in the box. The RL footprint is the same size as the old trucks I'm referring too.
My Dad started farming in 1952 with a "B" John Deere and a team of horses. He did have a jeep he brought back with him from the Korean War, but never really used that for farm chores. Had a number of 2wd pickups, had a livestock rack to fit them and hauled cattle to market in them. Got our first 4wd pickup in 1983. Still hardly ever used the 4wd part, even though we are deep in snow and mud country. However, we did use studded snow tires during the winter months. The nearest paved road was two miles away, but we often took 11 miles of gravel road into town.

For transportation, we almost always used cars. We used the pickups to haul cattle, grain, hay, seed corn and for large fencing jobs.

If we ever got stuck too bad (which wasn't often), we pulled ourselves out with one of our many tractors.

Now, i did get some ATVs stuck pretty bad out in some pasture draws and in the creek. We also had plenty of steep hills around the farm. Those two reasons are why i preferred dirt bikes over ATVs.
 

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And no transfer case either!

Also, the G1 RL is based off the MDX. The first PIlot came out in MY 2003 ( we had a 2004 before the 2006 Pilot) and the first RL came out in MY 2006. So I hardly think the Pilot is based off the Ridgeline. The G2 RL is based off the G3 Pilot... I believe it's fair to say... at least from the rear of the cabin forward. It will remain a P'up to me. ;)

Personally, the RL is a truck to me. It more closely matches my older Tacoma and T100 than it does the Pilot in appearance and utility. But it is almost functionally the same as the Pilot in that they both have exactly the same maintenance requirements and only differ in air filter part numbers and sizes. Otherwise, they take the same trans fluid and schedule, the same VTM-4 fluid and schedule, the same oil filter, oil and schedule, etc. and have identical operating characteristics.
You are correct in that the G1 is based off the MDX platform.

Now, as i recall, Honda started working on their next truck platform in either 2009 or 2011, depending on what story you listen to, and how the recession and tsunami played a part in the events. At any rate, when Honda developed the platform, they knew that there would be multiple vehicles built off of it. One of those vehicles was the G2 Ridgeline. Honda knew that they would need to beef up the platform for pickup truck duty, so they designed the platform to have upgraded components based on vehicle requirements.

The MDX was the first to debut on the new platform, possibly due to product cycles, but more likely because Acura gets the best stuff first. Then, due to the way product cycles fell out in the timeline, the Pilot got to use the platform next, followed by the G2.

Had the timeline been a little different, then the G2 could have just as easily debuted before the G3 Pilot, and we would might be arguing instead that the G2 is an MDX with a bed, or that the Pilot copied/used the G2 interior. It all really is semantics in the end, but it is also disparagingly simplistic to say that the Ridgeline is a Pilot with a bed. It's like asking Vision which side he is on (see "Avengers: Age of Ultron"). YMMV
 

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@zroger73, (can/t reply directly to your post due to forum issues) but I would classify them as crossovers with a bed, i.e. Ridgeline competitors. We'll see how the media compares them, the RL has already been excluded by TFL in some of it's video tests now as there is more relevant comparative models in production now.. It goes both ways, I consider Suburbans, Expeditions 4 Runners, truck based.platforms.
 
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