Honda Ridgeline Owners Club Forums banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am not sure how relevant this is to newer vehicles, but back in the "old days" when owning a 4WD, when the 4WD has been used infrequently, we would engage it now and again just to keep parts from sitting stagnant and getting internals lubed up. Now my question is, we will be using the 4WD rarely, so when the Intelligent Traction Management System is not providing power to the rear, are these components sitting stagnant?
Thanks,
Bill
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
972 Posts
I know there are a few posts about this. I vaguely remember an informative post by zroger73 but this will get you started.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,650 Posts
The rear axle always engages from a dead stop and temporarily anytime there is front wheel slipage as long as VSA is enabled. It disengages at a set speed (usually 18mph).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,793 Posts
I am not sure how relevant this is to newer vehicles, but back in the "old days" when owning a 4WD, when the 4WD has been used infrequently, we would engage it now and again just to keep parts from sitting stagnant and getting internals lubed up. Now my question is, we will be using the 4WD rarely, so when the Intelligent Traction Management System is not providing power to the rear, are these components sitting stagnant?
Thanks,
Bill
The differential is electro-mechanical with clutch packs. They engage and disengage as needed, however, as long as the 4 wheels are on the ground and spinning, all the gears and stuff are still spinning in their fluid. Just not actively doing the work when not needed. The AWD system manages power as needed and the modes you select is just a way to adjust/manage the applied torque.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,539 Posts
Basically, the Ridgeline's AWD system is automatic and in constant operation. There was/is plenty of misunderstanding that the VTM4 lock button is somehow a button to turn on and off 4WD. Rather what it actually does is provide the maximum power to the rear wheels that the system is capable of, overiding what the automatic sytem is deciding to do. It is useful when the automatic system isn't quite getting in done . . . perhaps you are stuck in a slippery situation or are planning on pulling a boat out of the water up a steep ramp that is also slippery . . .etc, etc.

Who's got the link(s) for the VTM4 operation on the Ridgeline? Plenty of good info to read up on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
The differential is electro-mechanical with clutch packs. They engage and disengage as needed, however, as long as the 4 wheels are on the ground and spinning, all the gears and stuff are still spinning in their fluid. Just not actively doing the work when not needed. The AWD system manages power as needed and the modes you select is just a way to adjust/manage the applied torque.
Thank you! (y)

Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Don't forget that the vehicle has a torque vectoring rear end. It's overdriven by 2.7% from the front axle so you can get some additional turning power from the outside rear wheel around corners.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Basically, the Ridgeline's AWD system is automatic and in constant operation. There was/is plenty of misunderstanding that the VTM4 lock button is somehow a button to turn on and off 4WD. Rather what it actually does is provide the maximum power to the rear wheels that the system is capable of, overiding what the automatic sytem is deciding to do. It is useful when the automatic system isn't quite getting in done . . . perhaps you are stuck in a slippery situation or are planning on pulling a boat out of the water up a steep ramp that is also slippery . . .etc, etc.

Who's got the link(s) for the VTM4 operation on the Ridgeline? Plenty of good info to read up on.
If im not mistaken, the 2G doesn't have a VTM4 lock button.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,020 Posts
If im not mistaken, the 2G doesn't have a VTM4 lock button.
That's a Gen1 capability. The Gen2 is all computer controlled with the only human input being the drive modes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Great thanks for sharing... Looks like mud and sand are the same? We are suppose to be getting snow this weekend in Northwest Montana so looks like I will be able to try "snow mode" for the first time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
By this chart I find it interesting to see an increase in the use of VSA in sand and mud, but no change on snow/ice, I would have thought just the opposite would be the case?

Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,234 Posts
Great thanks for sharing... Looks like mud and sand are the same? We are suppose to be getting snow this weekend in Northwest Montana so looks like I will be able to try "snow mode" for the first time.
The Sand mode is more aggressive on the RWD bias and throttle application, but the mapping is essentially the same.

My brother over just east of Spokane got a little snow yesterday.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,020 Posts
... Looks like mud and sand are the same? ...
No, as you can see in the diagram, Sand Mode is a more aggressive version of Mud Mode. Here is a short description from the Gen2's Wikipedia article:
"Intelligent traction management offers different drive modes [normal and snow for front-wheel drive (FWD) and adds mud and sand for all-wheel drive (AWD)] that adjusts throttle mapping, shift points, power distribution, and VSA responses.
  • Snow mode: Throttle input is made less aggressive to minimize pedal travel and make launching easier.
  • Mud mode: Throttle input is made more aggressive, torque vectoring is disabled, more power is sent to the rear wheels, the transmission delays upshifts, and traction control allows for more wheel-slip.
  • Sand mode: Similar to mud mode but with more aggressive setting, maximum rear-wheel bias, and the rear-differential is locked."
Source: https://jalopnik.com/heres-how-the-2017-honda-ridgelines-trick-off-roading-m-1775651261
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top