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I only have 2000 miles on my 2019 RL-E and I noticed that the bottom and to a lesser extent on the sides of the oil pan are very corroded. By taping on the pan it doesn't sound very thick so I'm kind of worried about leaks down the road in a year or two. Has anyone else noticed this on their trucks? I'm sure I could get under there and wire brush it clean and paint it with something to slow down the rot , but it's like what the hell Honda this thing is not even a year old and I get this ! Any ideas on what's best to use on the spots that I can't get at and will work with the exhaust pipe being so close ? I've been crawling under cars for most of my 72 years and it's not fun anymore so any easy fixes would be wonderful.
 

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I'll try , but it may be a while till I can get some ramps and get it up high enough for good pics.
Just to give you an idea , the corrosion on the flat bottom is about 3/32" thick and does not rub off easily and looks just like alum. rot you see on any other alum. thats been out in the weather for 10 years. It should have some sort of protective coating when used in this location with the exposure to heat , salt , and water.
 

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Probably doesn't help that the oil pan is barely above the minimum ground clearance and is unprotected from gravel and road debris. The RL is crying out for an engine skidplate...at least there are a couple aftermarket options for this.
 

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the corrosion on the flat bottom is about 3/32" thick and does not rub off easily and looks just like alum. rot you see on any other alum. thats been out in the weather for 10 years.
Yes, pics would be helpful. I strongly suspect that you are looking at the normal and desirable formation of aluminum oxide which serves to protect the underlying aluminum from further 'corrosion' and actual loss of structural integrity (very different from 'rust' on iron-based metals). Absent a manufacturing defect it's likely that the issue is strictly aesthetic. FWIW I've not run across any mentions of oil pan defects resulting in loss of integrity on any Honda forums.

The aesthetic appearance of aluminum oxide can vary depending on environment and exposure, and surfaces which are more frequently exposed to water (e.g. the bottom of the pan where condensation water droplets 'stick longer' than on the vertical sides) may well exhibit a more obvious / rough texture. The aesthetic appearance of aluminum oxide will also vary depending on the alloy of the aluminum and the component's formation process (e.g. sheet, cast, forged, etc).

Noting that even in salt-water marine applications, it's quite common for aluminum components to be left exposed and reliant on the natural formation of aluminum oxide for very effective long term protection / retention of structural integrity. 'Coating' of aluminum in that very aggressive environment is usually reserved for those components that demand a particular aesthetic or tactile characteristic (e.g. handrails, hulls) with the 'penalty' that those coatings require relative frequent maintenance to ensure the integrity of the coating itself. Anodizing of aluminum is itself a process to form the same very hard and protective aluminum oxide in a controlled fashion simply to yield a more aesthetically pleasing effect.

One thing for certain, I would not remove the aluminum oxide … that would defeat it's natural benefit and simply expose a fresh surface for repeated formation of the oxide.

Sure, you could undertake the effort of proper surface preparation and application of a more aesthetically satisfying coating engineered for aluminum applications - and then continue to maintain that against nicks and scratches. Doing that properly would IMO be very difficult with the pan in-situ. IMO that effort would not have any meaningful effect on the longevity of this component.
 

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It’s under warranty, take it to the dealer.
 

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Yes, pics would be helpful. I strongly suspect that you are looking at the normal and desirable formation of aluminum oxide which serves to protect the underlying aluminum from further 'corrosion' and actual loss of structural integrity (very different from 'rust' on iron-based metals). Absent a manufacturing defect it's likely that the issue is strictly aesthetic. FWIW I've not run across any mentions of oil pan defects resulting in loss of integrity on any Honda forums.

The aesthetic appearance of aluminum oxide can vary depending on environment and exposure, and surfaces which are more frequently exposed to water (e.g. the bottom of the pan where condensation water droplets 'stick longer' than on the vertical sides) may well exhibit a more obvious / rough texture. The aesthetic appearance of aluminum oxide will also vary depending on the alloy of the aluminum and the component's formation process (e.g. sheet, cast, forged, etc).

Noting that even in salt-water marine applications, it's quite common for aluminum components to be left exposed and reliant on the natural formation of aluminum oxide for very effective long term protection / retention of structural integrity. 'Coating' of aluminum in that very aggressive environment is usually reserved for those components that demand a particular aesthetic or tactile characteristic (e.g. handrails, hulls) with the 'penalty' that those coatings require relative frequent maintenance to ensure the integrity of the coating itself. Anodizing of aluminum is itself a process to form the same very hard and protective aluminum oxide in a controlled fashion simply to yield a more aesthetically pleasing effect.

One thing for certain, I would not remove the aluminum oxide … that would defeat it's natural benefit and simply expose a fresh surface for repeated formation of the oxide.

Sure, you could undertake the effort of proper surface preparation and application of a more aesthetically satisfying coating engineered for aluminum applications - and then continue to maintain that against nicks and scratches. Doing that properly would IMO be very difficult with the pan in-situ. IMO that effort would not have any meaningful effect on the longevity of this component.
Boy I sure hope your right , but I've been beating on and welding aluminum for a lot of years and this is not just surface oxide that you could shine up with a scotchbrite , it's furry like a microfiber towel, although I didn't see any pitting and my examination was under less than ideal conditions..... I was trying to see if I could get at the oil drain plug without jacking it up like on my old truck but kind of freaked when I saw all the corrosion . At least I know now that I'll have to get it up to get at the drain....and there is a LOT less ground clearance than I thought I had.
 

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I took at look at my pan last night, and noticed that the bottom of the oil pan has a distinctly different texture than the sides. Something in the mold they used creates a sandpapery texture on the bottom of the pan. It has distinct edges, so I assume it was purposeful. Maybe that is the "microfiber" appearance you noted.
 

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Before we start to drag this thread under speculation, get a picture up and lets start from there.
I have 27700+ miles on my '19 Odyssey that has the same engine as the G2 Ridgeline and sits a lot lower as well. Nothing fuzzy or weird on the pan. Looked very similar to my G1 pan, which is also clean for the 230K miles it has seen.

Pics Pics Pics Pics :)
 

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I changed my oil last Friday. I didn’t see anything unusual with the pan. Definitely no corrosion.
 

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Probably doesn't help that the oil pan is barely above the minimum ground clearance and is unprotected from gravel and road debris. The RL is crying out for an engine skidplate...at least there are a couple aftermarket options for this.
Skid plates are not made so much for gravel and road debris there made more for a hit. If some one had a skid I would remove it a few times a year to clear all the crap it held in. You cant see much and inspect when one is installed.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
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OK , so I finally got it up enough to get some pictures for all to see that asked. Now what do you think?
396868
 

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Not sure where you live, but that oxidation is more than mine. Also your exhaust pipe is rusted more than my G1. At least that is what I can see.
Chicago Il...... Lots of salt, but at less than 2200 miles it doesn't bode well for the future does it.
 

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Honestly, I experience it here in NJ as well, but religiously wash the cars every week during snowfall. I am really surprised how it looks on yours. Skid plate will make matters worse for you.

I would recommend getting the whole underneath of your truck treated.
 

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2200 miles and less than a year old, make it the dealers problem. Get it documented and don’t “DO” anything until they get to see it
 

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Aluminum Oxidation look it up, dont touch it, take back to Dealer and see what they say.
Took it in to the dealer today. They looked it over and took some pictures and said they are all like that but they would take it up with the factory. I'm not holding my breath on a reply to this issue.
I did look at a new pan at the parts counter and it was beautiful compared to the one on my truck as far as surface finish goes. My current pan seem to have a ruff / crude finish and may even be a different type of metal like pot / white metal which corrodes much faster. Just guessing on that , any other ideas?
 

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I wont be too worried, but if you are indeed too concerned, then gently sand it and use a very light exhaust manifold paint on it. The oil pan is designed to cool the oil by dissipating it through the pan surface, so any type of insulating paint would not be best.
I do recommend periodic car wash with an underbody wash for the winter months.... I am sure IL is headed there sooner than me in NJ.
 
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