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After my timing belt broke I did a compression check, the rear three cylinders had no compression. The front three have very good compression. I have the rear head off , I can see bent valves. Should I assume the front heads ok?
 

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After my timing belt broke I did a compression check, the rear three cylinders had no compression. The front three have very good compression. I have the rear head off , I can see bent valves. Should I assume the front heads ok?
No. The rear bank is cylinders 1, 2, and 3, and the front bank is 4, 5, and 6. The firing order is 1, 4, 2, 5, 3, 6. There is no more valve clearance on the rear bank than the front bank. So given the firing order there is no way for only the valves on the rear bank to hit the pistons when the belt failed.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
No. The rear bank is cylinders 1, 2, and 3, and the front bank is 4, 5, and 6. The firing order is 1, 4, 2, 5, 3, 6. There is no more valve clearance on the rear bank than the front bank. So given the firing order there is no way for only the valves on the rear bank to hit the pistons when the belt failed.
Ok I understand that, but how is there still compression in those front cylinders? Why should I take it apart if it's working?
 

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Ok I understand that, but how is there still compression in those front cylinders? Why should I take it apart if it's working?
I guess it depends on your goal. Is there damage on the front bank... yes. Are you trying to fix it just enough to sell or trade it then you might get away with only fixing the rear bank. If you're planning on keeping it then you better fix it right before you end up with a more serious problem that ends the life of the engine.
 

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How many miles on the RL? How many miles on the belt?
And when you're finished with the gun can I have it?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I guess it depends on your goal. Is there damage on the front bank... yes. Are you trying to fix it just enough to sell or trade it then you might get away with only fixing the rear bank. If you're planning on keeping it then you better fix it right before you end up with a more serious problem that ends the life of the engine.
I get what your saying that it's unlikely the front cylinder escaped damage,but if they were damaged how could they be holding compression?
 

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Even with acceptable compression stressed parts could fail prematurely. It will cost more to do it 'right' the second time.
 

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I get what your saying that it's unlikely the front cylinder escaped damage,but if they were damaged how could they be holding compression?
You got lucky.

But like Csimo said - it's possible that the front valves are damaged and they just haven't revealed themselves. Once you get everything back together and are driving the truck they could let go. I say it's worth taking the front head off while you're in there and taking a look. At the cost of the labor, a new head gasket, and new bolts -- relatively cheap in other words.

Chip H.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
You got lucky.

But like Csimo said - it's possible that the front valves are damaged and they just haven't revealed themselves. Once you get everything back together and are driving the truck they could let go. I say it's worth taking the front head off while you're in there and taking a look. At the cost of the labor, a new head gasket, and new bolts -- relatively cheap in other words.

Chip H.
Yes, I bet it is. By the way the manual says use new head bolts. The honda mechanic said I could reuse once. What do you think?
 

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How about some details on timing belt breaking? Miles? Original belt, etc...thanks! You would be the first i heard of breaking oem original belt
 

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Discussion Starter #13
How about some details on timing belt breaking? Miles? Original belt, etc...thanks! You would be the first i heard of breaking oem original belt
It's all in the previous posts,but here's a recap. Replaced original belt last year at 150k, tensioner had failed ,belt was making noise,but didn't break. Ran fine for a year around 10k miles. Belt broke. I removed timing cover small nut fell out, that was one of the nuts that held the crank sensor. Belt,cover,wiring,crank sensor were shredded, (wasn't in the truck when it happened). I'm thinking maybe when original tensioner failed belt hit the small nut and loosened it, over time it got looser and eventually fell off.
 

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....................
 

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Bolts are supposed to be one use only but they get reused all the time. Even dealerships reuse them. The bolts are torque to yield bolts so they do get stretched....with each use they just become a little more weaker. IMO if they have never been removed before then reusing them once is a safe gamble.

In contrast, my valve cover bolts started giving out after about the eighth time lol.


Get all your valves out and spin them one at a time in a high speed drill. Cheap and effective way to check them, keep them all in their original place. Eyeball the valve guides and If you can/want pass a T guage through them and check...I suspect you'll be able to see damage if it's there.

To maybe help ease your mind, I know of a guy who bent 16 valves after a TB broke and all he had to replace were the valves and the belt. Ran fine after.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Bolts are supposed to be one use only but they get reused all the time. Even dealerships reuse them. The bolts are torque to yield bolts so they do get stretched....with each use they just become a little more weaker. IMO if they have never been removed before then reusing them once is a safe gamble.

In contrast, my valve cover bolts started giving out after about the eighth time lol.


Get all your valves out and spin them one at a time in a high speed drill. Cheap and effective way to check them, keep them all in their original place. Eyeball the valve guides and If you can/want pass a T guage through them and check...I suspect you'll be able to see damage if it's there.

To maybe help ease your mind, I know of a guy who bent 16 valves after a TB broke and all he had to replace were the valves and the belt. Ran fine after.

Good luck.
Thanks for the info. Umm what's a t gauge?
 

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You would want to pull the head at the very least, to get it inspected if nothing else...... and at that point, it's not that big a deal to throw in some new valves if you find the ones that have "made contact".... or that you can see are bent. Better just to "do it right" as Rollin & others point out.... but even if you have to skimp (money issues or whatever), you've GOT to spend the extra labor to at least check things out completely. I'm assuming you're pulling these heads yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
You would want to pull the head at the very least, to get it inspected if nothing else...... and at that point, it's not that big a deal to throw in some new valves if you find the ones that have "made contact".... or that you can see are bent. Better just to "do it right" as Rollin & others point out.... but even if you have to skimp (money issues or whatever), you've GOT to spend the extra labor to at least check things out completely. I'm assuming you're pulling these heads yourself.
Yes, I'm doing the work myself. I'm going to pull the other head to be safe, that seems to be the consensus. Thanks for the tips from everyone here.
 

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T Gauge = Telescoping gauge, you can also use a ball gauge. They range in size of just a few mm to several inches. You essentially reduce it's size all the way down to as small as you can and then insert it into several areas of the valve guide (in this case)... A,B,C with A being the upper half, B being the middle and C being the lower half. You then expand the gauge to take a reading... pull it out and measure how much it expanded with a caliper or micrometer. You can then either compare it to spec or in your case, just compare it to the rest since there will be wear.

Here is what I found in a quick search to help illustrate what I'm talking about.
http://www.harborfreight.com/6-piece-telescoping-gauge-set-5649.html

It's just a tool used to measure clearances in holes.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
T Gauge = Telescoping gauge, you can also use a ball gauge. They range in size of just a few mm to several inches. You essentially reduce it's size all the way down to as small as you can and then insert it into several areas of the valve guide (in this case)... A,B,C with A being the upper half, B being the middle and C being the lower half. You then expand the gauge to take a reading... pull it out and measure how much it expanded with a caliper or micrometer. You can then either compare it to spec or in your case, just compare it to the rest since there will be wear.

Here is what I found in a quick search to help illustrate what I'm talking about.
http://www.harborfreight.com/6-piece-telescoping-gauge-set-5649.html

It's just a tool used to measure clearances in holes.
Ok thanks for the info., the heads are going to a machine shop where they will check that measurement.
 
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