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I'm in process of putting my Big 3 wires together, and I have the Knuconceptz screw ring terminals, and 0 gauge wire. Is there a special trick to insert wire into terminal without fraying or coming undone.
Heard of tinning wire 1st but what have you guys done to put wire into terminal.
 

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I'm in process of putting my Big 3 wires together, and I have the Knuconceptz screw ring terminals, and 0 gauge wire. Is there a special trick to insert wire into terminal without fraying or coming undone.
Heard of tinning wire 1st but what have you guys done to put wire into terminal.
Assume you are experiencing fray after removing the cable jacket? The fray resulting in strands resisting insertion to a connector? If so, tinning the wire will hold the strands together, making insertion to the connector *easier* but tinning large gauge cable is an acquired skill. If you aren't already proficient with soldering in general, you'll need to practice to get it right.

The basic rule of soldering is: solder flows to the heat source. With that in mind, conductors to be tinned need to be at solder melt temps for proper flow and adhesion. The "trick" with large scale stranded cable is to ensure solder flows evenly thru all strands all the way to the center.

The most common soldering mistake/error is "cold" solder which manifests as solder detaching from the surfaces its intended to adhere too.

Cable that size is usually tinned one of two ways: torch or solder pot. Torches works very well but they add the challenge of heating conductors so solder flows without melting/distorting the insulation jacket.

Solder pots work very well for large gauge wiring but dipping cold cable (cable vs. small gauge wire) into liquid solder doesn't work well - at least, not for accomplishing what solder is *supposed to do* - meaning liquid solder coming into contact with and adhering to all strands in any gauge wire - so pre-heating the cable before dipping is good practice.

Solder used in pots isn't the same as flux core that comes on a roll, so using a pot means applying flux before dipping in solder. Skilled cable guys who work with large cable commonly use flux and 60/40 rolled solder when torching (as opposed to flux core) because more consistent results is achieved as skill is acquired.

IME: 300 watt electric guns, torches, pots and bare ends have been used when attaching 4 G or larger cable to clamping connectors. If you aren't already familiar with soldering and/or are not all that thrilled about acquiring that skill or buying new tools, I'd recommend experimenting with techniques of carefully stripping the jacket to minimize fray and positioning strands by hand to eliminate fraying when inserting into the connector. That too is an acquired skill/experimental technique. But it will only cost your time.

IME: clamping connectors work best when strands are allowed to compress and spread inside the receptor port as the clamp applies force. Now, about the corrosion occurring overtime in any/all techniques used with battery connectors....
 

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That wire is oversize, that is probably why it won't fit properly.

Thinning it can work well, you will need expensive tools to do it right like the ones mentioned and it may just get bigger and don't fit.


Go to Home Depot buy a pipe 1/2" thick, use type k or L copper only if possible, type m is thinner, it may also work just use your own judgement about the type you use,you only need a hammer a drill, pipe cutter or saw that cuts metal and a file to make your own.


For sometime I was in favor or soldering and crimping them, but honestly unless you have a powerful torch or you are good at soldering, I'm not sure it's worth the time, risk of damaging the insulation or wire.

A good crimp is good enough and you can avoid corrosion by putting some silicon dialectic grease on the wire exposed after you crimp it, also on the connector area before heat shrink it.
Or avoid the grease if you just use tape.


It's going to be a pain to run 0 g wire to the alternator, if si ever do this, I will simply add 4 g wire to the alternator, and use 0 g wire to the engine and chassis ground.


How are you going to run the wire to the alternator if you Skip th fuse box?

When I looked at this upgrade before, I came to the conclusion that if ran straight from the pos to the alt, it can be ran under the black plastic big engine cover, over some areas that will prevent melting or the wire touching hot metal.

I've seen many cars running a hot wire on the top of the radiator, I don't think I'll have the balls to do that, if involved in a head on crash or not use like 10 zip ties, I've seen some with just 2 or 3 zip ties.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Have a quick question, I purchased some 1/2 copper pipe, have pipe cutter on hand, Crimper, (Thanks Laserguy).. Anyone know the bolt size for ground wire on engine block, What size socket to use?
 

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Have a quick question, I purchased some 1/2 copper pipe, have pipe cutter on hand, Crimper, (Thanks Laserguy).. Anyone know the bolt size for ground wire on engine block, What size socket to use?
In this post, you mention going a more simple route:
Thanks laserguy.. I might end up getting a nice component set with everything.. Then a small amp to power speakers, may look into Kenwood 3004 I believe which I can install amp behind glove box, have all my crossover right there (Plug n Play)!!
These two quotes are (almost) in conflict with one another. "Big 3" is normally part of an effort to eek out the last few drops of current supply in a fairly elaborate audio system. Do you have a goal in mind for the overall system? Perhaps you are expending effort "just because"? Otherwise, if you have concluded the simpler system is your direction, "the big 3" won't be adding to your listening pleasure.

A casual search of the field service manual returned no specific bolt info - it might be found with a deeper search. There are several engine ground points. 06 thru 08 diagram below.

EngineGround.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Engine ground B, size 10 mm socket!!!
 

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Sorry, I didn't realize that was the question, on a Honda about 70%, maybe more can be completed with a 10mm, 13mm and 17mm.
 

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I think you want to use the closer ones to the battery. Battery gnd and engine gnd on that chart posted. Either 1/4 or 5/16" stud size for those bolts, the battery ground may be 1/4".

You can always drill the hole bigger once you remove the bolts, since you want to make the terminals.

Make sure the copper pipe is 1/2" outside diameter, if it's inside diameter it may be way too big if not for the wire, for the area it will be bolted to.


A flaring kit, it's nice to have and it helps to put the wire in the terminal making the opening larger also like the one pictured

Worse case, get a 2/0 terminal and it should work with the 0 g Knu wire, one terminal that looks like the one pictured. Knu KOL copper 1/0 wire has a 10.5 mm conductor, Normal OO is 9.25mm, Knu is even bigger , but the many strands makes it even worse to feed it in the terminal before crimping it



Double Tube Flaring Tool Kit
 

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