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Probably stating the obvious here, but I would try to keep total weight of any wheel/tire combination close to stock. If one can actually save weight, then the benefits are better suspension performance plus better acceleration and braking. I put a lighter wheel/tire combo on one of my slightly modified Miatas and the improvement in acceleration and braking performance was fairly significant due to the lower rotational inertia. Really surprised me.
 

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Do any companies make quality wheel spacers for the Honda bolt pattern? I'd like to keep the OEM wheels, but a bit more offset would probably be all that is needed to clear some larger rubber.

I ran Spidertrax spacers on my last Jeep. Not a single issue, rode great on the hwy (for a Jeep) and I beat the dog crap out of it off road.
 

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... I would try to keep total weight of any wheel/tire combination close to stock. ...I put a lighter wheel/tire combo on one of my slightly modified Miatas and the improvement in acceleration and braking performance was fairly significant due to the lower rotational inertia. Really surprised me.
I am with you on this. Sucking up torque and weighing down suspension with a needlessly heavy wheel/tire combo is a sad price to pay for fashion. And yet sturdy-yet-light wheels with good load ratings in larger sizes are rare. The lighter/stiffer quality stuff is gonna cost ya.

Do any companies make quality wheel spacers for the Honda bolt pattern?
5x120 wheels spacers are out there, however the center bore is the larger concern. Many aftermarket wheels require hub rings, to fill the space between the larger center bore on the wheel and the smaller Honda hub size (64mm, I believe). Some spacers will provide both duties: decrease offset and function to adapt the wheel to the hub.

Most engineer types will frown on the use of spacers. They'll suggest the purchase of the correct wheel with all the characteristics you may want to fit your vehicle and even possibility add the benefit of lowered unsprung weight, as toddyridge mentions^. It's a cost/quality/compromise question. There are high quality larger wheels out there that may be ordered with exact diameter/width/offset/center bore. But these are not $149 specials at your local tire shop.
 

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I am with you on this. Sucking up torque and weighing down suspension with a needlessly heavy wheel/tire combo is a sad price to pay for fashion. And yet sturdy-yet-light wheels with good load ratings in larger sizes are rare. The lighter/stiffer quality stuff is gonna cost ya.



5x120 wheels spacers are out there, however the center bore is the larger concern. Many aftermarket wheels require hub rings, to fill the space between the larger center bore on the wheel and the smaller Honda hub size (64mm, I believe). Some spacers will provide both duties: decrease offset and function to adapt the wheel to the hub.

Most engineer types will frown on the use of spacers. They'll suggest the purchase of the correct wheel with all the characteristics you may want to fit your vehicle and even possibility add the benefit of lowered unsprung weight, as toddyridge mentions^. It's a cost/quality/compromise question. There are high quality larger wheels out there that may be ordered with exact diameter/width/offset/center bore. But these are not $149 specials at your local tire shop.
I'm an engineer actually. I do see the reservations about spacers, but I've got good personal experience with them like I said. You're right, it is a compromise. Spacers are the only option when you want to keep the OEM wheel sometimes. That's why I'd be very concerned with the quality of the spacer, only go with ones that have a proven track record. Now my experience was on a TJ Wrangler, I'd have to think twice about spacers on tight(er) handling daily driver, but they are cheap to try. As for safety, I don't think a quality spacer is any more of a concern than these 20" brittle OEM alloys with thin sidewalls that you see everywhere these days. People run thick spacers on 2 ton lifted F-150's without issue.

I agree 100% that the less rotating mass, the better. I've read/watched a few reviews about the new Shelby GT350-R with the carbon fiber wheels. The reviewers are simply speechless with the handling difference the wheels make.
 

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Are there any carbon fiber wheels that would fit the ridgeline?
 

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Are there any carbon fiber wheels that would fit the ridgeline?
Somebody of the established rim manufacturers (aftermarket) will build to suit. That is, if there is a style of wheel you really like, you can purchase (or down payment) and they will fit the proper center to fit your vehicle and custom offset that you specify. Centerline used to do this, but I'm not sure who the big players are these days. It may cost a little or a lot extra, depending on the manufacturer's setup.

Stockton Wheel in California is/was famous for building rims in any configuration, but I don't know if they deal with carbon fiber.
 

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Somebody of the established rim manufacturers (aftermarket) will build to suit. That is, if there is a style of wheel you really like, you can purchase (or down payment) and they will fit the proper center to fit your vehicle and custom offset that you specify. Centerline used to do this, but I'm not sure who the big players are these days. It may cost a little or a lot extra, depending on the manufacturer's setup.

Stockton Wheel in California is/was famous for building rims in any configuration, but I don't know if they deal with carbon fiber.
I've never inquired but I have to think that a quality custom carbon fiber wheel would be insanely expensive. That and the significant difference in weight may not jive with the way the suspension is tuned.

From what I remember, the Shelby's wheels are made by an Australian company and originally cost $50,000 EACH until Ford contracted with them and was able to get the cost down significantly (about $4k each I think).

EDIT: Sorry, 15-20k EACH was the original price, according to Jay Leno :)
https://youtu.be/WYU94CB7RO0?t=267
 

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I agree 100% that the less rotating mass, the better. I've read/watched a few reviews about the new Shelby GT350-R with the carbon fiber wheels. The reviewers are simply speechless with the handling difference the wheels make.
Unsprung weight hanging at the end of suspension is like the pendulum of a clock. The greater the mass and weight, the more its effect on inertia, meaning that once in motion it wants to keep going until the inertia is exhausted (like the pendulum of a clock slowing down and changing direction). So in our case this slows reaction time of the suspension, making it slower to react to changes in direction as the tire meets oncoming changing surfaces.

Then there is the ratio of unsprung weight to sprung weight, which effects ride quality. Remember the big old boats of the 1970s? When you have a multi-ton vehicle even heavy steel wheels are a much lower ratio of mass compared to the vehicle riding on the springs. Net result is plush wallowy ride. Floaty. Like a boat! :)

So with lighter modern cars there is a design dilemma to create good ride quality, because that ideal ratio requires unsprung weight much lower due to the lighter sprung weight. So materials become a bigger factor (like carbon fiber... which also apparently offers much greater stiffness, such that the wheels do not distort in the way that alloys wheels do).

As for a Ridgeline with carbon fiber wheels, I have to wonder that the cost would approach half the value of the current Black Edition Ridgeline. So... maybe not. ;)
 

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oh.... never mind then :D

had no idea they cost that much
 

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Unsprung weight hanging at the end of suspension is like the pendulum of a clock. The greater the mass and weight, the more its effect on inertia, meaning that once in motion it wants to keep going until the inertia is exhausted (like the pendulum of a clock slowing down and changing direction). So in our case this slows reaction time of the suspension, making it slower to react to changes in direction as the tire meets oncoming changing surfaces.

Then there is the ratio of unsprung weight to sprung weight, which effects ride quality. Remember the big old boats of the 1970s? When you have a multi-ton vehicle even heavy steel wheels are a much lower ratio of mass compared to the vehicle riding on the springs. Net result is plush wallowy ride. Floaty. Like a boat! :)

So with lighter modern cars there is a design dilemma to create good ride quality, because that ideal ratio requires unsprung weight much lower due to the lighter sprung weight. So materials become a bigger factor (like carbon fiber... which also apparently offers much greater stiffness, such that the wheels do not distort in the way that alloys wheels do).

As for a Ridgeline with carbon fiber wheels, I have to wonder that the cost would approach half the value of the current Black Edition Ridgeline. So... maybe not. ;)
If one could only put some Elka Stage 5 shocks or any off road race shock, this would help in that area big time.
 

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Sooo if one wants to blame a lift its fine this truck has 110,000 with a lift and has always run 245 70 17 Mich. LTX AT 2s. Plenty of gravel road flyin and some fire road trails. Just replaced inner and outer tie rods left and right sides. Im picky and dont think many would question such a thing but thats me. Only one right side inner was gettin worn so i did them all. The rest were fine but showin some wear in the rubber boot on the outter. Didnt what to nit pick and wait for every individual one to go out cause you need an alignment job for everyone replaced so I replaced them all nice and tight again. Alignment 105 bucks a pop here you got 4 tie rods so do the math, parts kinda cheap alignment expensive, my truck may be gettin old but in good shape. Cost less then 1 month payment on a new RL, im good. Any one of you new RL owners wanna come here and do some trails?
 

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well....that answers one question I posed in the "picture thread" although can't make out the size. Looks like a bit less offset than stock. Tires look good and your setup fills the wheel wells much better than stock IMO.
 

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well....that answers one question I posed in the "picture thread" although can't make out the size. Looks like a bit less offset than stock. Tires look good and your setup fills the wheel wells much better than stock IMO.
P265/60R18. Yes, "a bit" less offset, as in 23mm!

Had these tires on my first 2014 SE Ridge. Didn't wish to modify the front fender wells on the Gen1 to prevent rubbing, which would have required body seam modification and then flattening of the plastic fender liner and splash guard. The real downer was that they robbed too much torque. They also introduced a little bump steer, er... bounce steer, ;) but they really kicked ass on powdery and loose dirt roads and smoothed out both offroad terrain and the urban jungle too. Taller sidewalls really have their place at times, until that heavy turn-in at 75MPH, of course!

The press/dealer junket trucks were stated to have some "rub" with the bigger Firestones and, presumedly, stock wheels and no spacers. Something about the raised letters in the inside sidewall wearing. Stock Gen2 BE wheels being 55et, I chose to push outward a bit to see how these old M/S2s fit. These have raised letters, turned inward. As it it, I have plenty of clearance off the sidewall (from the strut, which is one typical area of issue).

I have one small rub-a-dub at the front rear inner liner, at full lock and on throttle/suspension articulation. I will comment further once I understand more.

These tires are 9/10th's inch taller, and 3/10th's inch wider at the tread, with fairly square tread edges, whereas the quieter/lighter/more-highly-rated Michelin Premiere LTX in the same size has a wider tread width, yet I wonder that the greater edge radi might play nicer with inner fender clearance. Those Premiers in the 265 size are also the same weight as the OEM Firestones, which is helpful (so four pounds lighter each compared to these M/S2s). I am still collecting data on wheel weight.


Gen2 2017 Honda Ridgeline "BE" as received:
Firestone Destination LE2 245/60R18 105H SL
UTQG: 520 A A (data indicated on tire)
Max Load: 2,039 lbs.
Max Inflation Pressure: 44 psi
Tread Depth: 11/32”
Tire Weight: 31 lbs.
Rim Width Range: 7-8.5”
Meas. Rim Width: 7”
Sect. Width: 9.8”
Tread Width: 7.9”
Overall Diameter: 29.6”
Revs. Per Mile: 704
Country of origin: US

Current set of tires:
Michelin LTX M/S2 p265/60R18
UTQG: 720 A A
Max Load: 2,271 lbs.
Max Inflation Pressure: 44 psi.
Tread Depth: 10.5/32”
Tire Weight: 35 lbs.
Rim Width Range: 7.5-9.5”
Meas. Rim Width: 8”
Sect. Width: 10.7”
Tread Width: 8.2”
Overall Diameter: 30.5”
Revs. Per Mile: 682
Country of origin: US
 

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@ccr: I notice that your OE Firestones are listed as 105H 320 A A. Mine are 105H 520 A A. Is this a typo, or did we get different tires? Tirerack.com shows the 105H 320 A A as the OE tire; however, I've checked mine three times (all four tires, too) to make sure that I wasn't reading the tire wrong, and mine say 105H 520 A A.
 

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@ccr: I notice that your OE Firestones are listed as 105H 320 A A. Mine are 105H 520 A A. Is this a typo, or did we get different tires? Tirerack.com shows the 105H 320 A A as the OE tire; however, I've checked mine three times (all four tires, too) to make sure that I wasn't reading the tire wrong, and mine say 105H 520 A A.
Well, this is interesting... good catch!

I had a look at my image database. Sure enough, the back of the tire that was on my Gen2 BE, a 245/60R-18 105H (as opposed to a P245/60R-18 104H) is marked "520". And yet Firestone's own online spec data does not include Uniform Tire Quality Grade Standards (UTQG) data whereas Tirerack includes it, but it would appear to be incorrect. Tirerack also indicates the weight is 31 lbs., while Firestone indicates 32 lbs.

Firestone lists the two 245/60R-18 tires far apart, so I have composited the data under the column header for easier reading on these forums.

Based on averaging some scale data, the Gen2 BE tire/wheel combo is about 60.5 lbs (without TPMS, but with tire weights), which if the tires are 31-32 lbs, suggests that the BE 18x8 wheels are under 29 lbs., which isn't too bad for an OEM cast alloy wheel.
 

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Excellent - thanks for all the detailed (and important) info. As I said earlier, there are other important considerations beyond simply the tire size.

I think the Michelin Premiers might be a very good choice for G2 as well.......except for aggressive off-roading.
 
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