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2020 RTL-E
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Discussion Starter #1
The previous owner didn't know anything about the truck. It was a farm truck and the farm manager who drove it left the farm....

He took it to a dealer to trade it in and the dealer told him it needed new brakes, some 60k mile service, and some other misc stuff to justify what he was offering as a trade in for it.

I have copies of previous service records and also what the guy says the dealer said it needed done - the 60k mile service was around $500 and the brakes were $800.

The brakes feel fine and don't squeak at all, but I will have them looked at when I get it in for service.

I'm not aware of anything specific in the 60k service because of the maintenance minder - I did read in the manual that of the vehicle has towed a lot or operated in extreme temps that the timing belt should be changed at 60k, but that seems like it would be more than $500

Here is what I've learned by looking over the service records:



It had a "30,000" service of oil change, trany fluid, diff fluids, pads replaced... Is that similar to what the 60k service is?

(I kind of don't like the dealer he was doing this service at. The dealer near me doesnt refer to things by "miles" in the type of service but actually mentions the mm code on the record... )


At 32k miles "brakes pulsate when are applied hard, front and rear brake rotors have hot spots and slightly pulsate - replaced pads only per customer"


36k miles, no mention of noise in brakes when it came in again.

at 44k miles it says it had "noisy brakes" and front pads measuring 9mm, rear pads at 7mm and brakes were cleaned and lubed then. (No mention of rotor issues in that note)

Rear shocks were replaced under warranty around 36k, which I thought was interesting.

Front stabilizer links and bushings were replaced at 40k.
 

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2008 Ridgeline RTS in Billet Silver Metallic
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Hmm, sounds like it may have led a rough life. Still, the RL is pretty hardy.

I'm surprised to hear of brake pads being replaced that early. I got 75k or so out of my rear pads (mostly city driving) and am still on my OEM front pads at 84k miles. The wear limit is 1mm but I don't like to go much below 2.5mm, just for some headroom. Also, I've never heard of front stab links and bushings going out at 40k either. The OEM shocks should have lasted much longer too. I have to wonder if it was routinely overloaded.

Those 30k and 60k mile services are dealer invented services and while they do provide a valuable service, tend to be more conservative (and bring in more service $). In my area, a typical 60k mile service might include oil and filter change, tranny fluid change, rear diff (VTM-4) fluid change, transfer fluid change, and engine and cabin filters along with a tire rotation... all for ~$500.

You can buy the OEM fluids/filters and use syn oil and DIY for around $125 if you shop your parts. DIY is pretty easy on this truck and it doesn't really need to be lifted to do any of the service work except for tire rotations and brake work (so you can remove the wheels).

Best of luck with your new-to-you RL and I hope it serves you well.
 

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Not overly surprised at the rapid wear on some of the "on the ground" parts, given the farm duty. Who knows how regularly or severely it was pounded.
But as Speed say, you should be good to go once everything is refreshed. It's really mostly the "wear" items that should be adversely effected much by that semi-harsh duty.
 

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If this were mine I'd ignore what the dealer said; just drive it and be on your way.

As for maintenance, I'd take care of any obvious problems but otherwise just continue with the maint. minder schedule; as long as the brakes stop smoothly without any squealing/pulling/vibrating etc. then I'd ignore those also.

I find it hard to see how farm use would gather so many miles. My daily driver 2011 RL is only at about 45K miles.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The farm was a wholesale flower dealer. I bet it was used for deliveries too - so its probably a mix of hard miles and highway miles.

I'm not taking what the dealer said too seriously. I do think I should change the fluids though. For my sedan I never bothered changing the oil myself, but with how high this truck is it seems like it should be pretty easy to get under it and work around down there so I might diy the fluid changes. (There are a few good video guides some forum members have put up on YouTube)

One other random thing with it is there is a small chunk of plastic on the front inner fender. It doesn't look like anything else got damaged other than the plastic up there, so I'll replace that too (the part looks like it costs less than $50 to get including shipping, the service manual doesn't make it sound very hard to replace)

Yeah. It probably had a harder life. Most of the year it should have a pretty easy life with me. I don't plan to tow anything. For about 6 weeks during maple sugaring season every year I'll haul around 100-150 gallons of sap a few miles up the road.

It will 90% be used for commuting so I think it should have a less hard life here with me.
 

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during maple sugaring season

As a child we did that with the trees in our front yard. Maine, NH, Vermont?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
during maple sugaring season

As a child we did that with the trees in our front yard. Maine, NH, Vermont?
I'm in Vermont. If I had been smart, I would have kept myself to tapping just a few trees... I'm doing around 100 taps this year. This is large for a backyard hobby standard but low from a producer standpoint.

It's a fun way to spend the early spring. My kids help a little bit to.
 

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We had 6-8 maples before the state widened the highway and took them out. They paid my dad all of 25 cents each. We replaced those by going into the woods and digging up native Xmas trees; those grew fast - leading to worries about being topped. Maine, mid 1960s.

Enjoy the ridge and post some pics.
 
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