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Discussion Starter #1
This past weekend I did a complete brake job front and rear on my 2007 Ridge, 82K miles. I resurfaced the factory rotors, replaced the pads with Duralast Golds, and completely flushed the brake fluid (in the proper sequence).

I drove it a little on Saturday and a little more on Sunday and everything seemed awesome. Monday when I left for work however I heard a clunking sound coming from the Passenger side of the vehicle. The sound is only there during medium to hard braking, with light braking the sound isn't there. Also the sound seemed to all but go away the warmer the brakes got, however it returned the cooler they got.

When I returned home from work I took everything apart and checked everything and everything was tight and looked good? I'm at a loss and not sure what to do next. The only thing that I can possibly think is on the OEM pads there is 1 shim on each of the inside pads and 2 shims on each of the outside pads. On the Duralast pads, they came with 1 shim already placed on each, so I didn't use the factory shims at all as I assumed that the new pads and their shims replaced these. Could this possibly be the problem?

Any help would be greatly appreciated!
 

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The shims are usually for squeaking. I would check to make sure the slides and brackets are all tight. Also, did you lube the slides, maybe the calipers are hanging up?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I did double check that everything was tight.

I didn't take the slides apart, and I will try that. I found this other thread that explains explains doing that. Is there anything that need to be serviced on the piston, because I didn’t do anything here as well besides compressing it to make room for the new brake components

http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/showthread.php?t=31277
 

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Usually nothing is done on the piston unless you have one that sticks and then you would have the caliper rebuilt or get a new one.

The slide pins should get lubed with caliper grease.

Also, did you replace the caliper hardware that pops into the brackets, those are to keep the pads sliding smoothly. If you didn't replace that hardware, I would get a hardware kit, they're fairly cheap or you can pop the caliper off and run a wire brush over the bracket surface where the pads slide on. Often times corrosion on the sliding surface of the bracket can cause the pads to hang up as well.

This may sound obvious, but did you torque the lug nuts up?

Besides the above, I don't know what else would cause the clunking you're mentioning.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I didn't get a hardware kit, but I will and try that at the same time I re-grease the calipers.

And yes, I did torque down the lug nuts :act006:
 

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What torque did you use on the caliper bolts, after swinging them back into place?

Chip H.
 

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Check the caliper slide pins, I've had that happen a few times, and each time had to remove the pins, clean and lightly sand them, and put on new caliper grease. Changed my rotors and pads a few months ago, and the passenger rear had a stuck pin, I had to order new ones to make it right.
 

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I don't know if this could be a contributing factor or not, but did you ensure the rear rotors went on the same side they were on before you removed them. I don't believe the rear brake rotors are directional, but I could be wrong. I know they're not vented, so it may be a non-issue.

When you removed the hold down screws, did you replace them at all, reinstall the old ones or did you buy new ones.

Along with the clunking sounds, is any vibration transmitted through the brake pedal?

Before you pressed the caliper piston back into the caliper, did you inspect the rubber boot on the piston for any damage. Any tears or rips could mean a bad piston seal and the caliper will need to be rebuilt.

When you pressed the piston back into postion, was it a smooth process? It didn't appear to stick or take extra pressure to get it to move past a certain spot?

When the tires are mounted, do they spin freely or is there any restrictions or rubbing.

It's possible whoever turned the rotors might have done a half-assed job or the rotors could be slightly warped and it wasn't discovered, especially if the above is true. Did you trust the shop where it was done? While you're lubing the caliper pins it might be worth your while to pull the rotors again and have them inspected at another shop, just to be sure.

One more suggestion, before you lube the caliper pins, go to the dealership and buy a set of rubber boots.

I just did my rear brakes and in the process of removing the boots to lube the pins, one of them tore. A boot set only cost a couple of bucks, but it's worth it. Rubber can wear out and this is one place where you don't need the aggravation.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Success!

last evening I started with the side (I thought) the sound was coming from, the passenger rear and took it all apart once again. This time however I took the caliper all apart and cleaned and re-greased it. Re-assembled everything and the sound was still there.

I had my wife drive, while I was in the back (I have a canopy), and I couldn't discern which side it was coming from. I drove while she listened from the 2nd row floorboard (seats folded up) and she was pretty sure it was coming from the drivers side rear.

So back to the garage and I took the driver side rear all apart and gave it the same treatment I gave the other side. Presto, that was the problem and the sound is gone.

Thanks for all the helpful advice to all, I appreciate it!
 

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You got to love this site.
 
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