Honda Ridgeline Owners Club Forums banner

1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Did all the fluids on the Ridge last week myself (thanks to the postings on the ROC it's so easy) and decided at 125k miles to get the brake fluid done. Decided to rely on the dealer for this "to get it done right". Well, $99.09 (with $10 coupon) later and I'm ready for another 100k right? Next morning I decide to check the work done.... Fluid is filled to the very top of the reservoir. Back to the dealer to gripe, they acknowledge the 'error' and remove some fluid and say they will let the technician know to not do this again. Hah, I wouldn't call them a technician! Anyway, now about 300miles and I see the reservoir fluid is getting a little dark. Makes me wonder if the guy just removed and replaced my reservoir fluid and with some driving, I'm getting some old fluid exchange making it get dark. They did charge me for a "fluid exchange kit". My other two cars the brake fluid is still almost clear after thousands of miles. I let the service manager know about this and he came back with a free oil change offer for my trouble. I wouldn't let them TOUCH my vehicle for an oil change - wrong oil, too tight on the filter, stripped drain bolt - now I'm paranoid :).

Back to the subject - Anyone know if the brake system is properly drained and refilled if there should be any discoloration after a few hundred miles?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
229 Posts
Did all the fluids on the Ridge last week myself (thanks to the postings on the ROC it's so easy) and decided at 125k miles to get the brake fluid done. Decided to rely on the dealer for this "to get it done right". Well, $99.09 (with $10 coupon) later and I'm ready for another 100k right? Next morning I decide to check the work done.... Fluid is filled to the very top of the reservoir. Back to the dealer to gripe, they acknowledge the 'error' and remove some fluid and say they will let the technician know to not do this again. Hah, I wouldn't call them a technician! Anyway, now about 300miles and I see the reservoir fluid is getting a little dark. Makes me wonder if the guy just removed and replaced my reservoir fluid and with some driving, I'm getting some old fluid exchange making it get dark. They did charge me for a "fluid exchange kit". My other two cars the brake fluid is still almost clear after thousands of miles. I let the service manager know about this and he came back with a free oil change offer for my trouble. I wouldn't let them TOUCH my vehicle for an oil change - wrong oil, too tight on the filter, stripped drain bolt - now I'm paranoid :).

Back to the subject - Anyone know if the brake system is properly drained and refilled if there should be any discoloration after a few hundred miles?
If you are capable of changing your oil you should also be capable of changing your brake fluid, that way you know it's done right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
277 Posts
Yes, it does sound like they just sucked the master cylinder dry and poured in half a bottle of new brake fluid.

Seems like good Honda dealers are hard to find around here. Bryan Honda in Fayetteville is generally pretty lousy. I bought a CR-V from Sanford Honda and they were okay, but I didn't care for their service department. I took it back for a front suspension noise, suggesting it may be something in the brakes (the noise went away if you rode the brake pedal). They replaced both front struts. Thanks, guys, but the noise is still there. I replaced the pads myself, fixed the noise, and never went back.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
579 Posts
Did all the fluids on the Ridge last week myself (thanks to the postings on the ROC it's so easy) and decided at 125k miles to get the brake fluid done. Decided to rely on the dealer for this "to get it done right". Well, $99.09 (with $10 coupon) later and I'm ready for another 100k right? Next morning I decide to check the work done.... Fluid is filled to the very top of the reservoir. Back to the dealer to gripe, they acknowledge the 'error' and remove some fluid and say they will let the technician know to not do this again. Hah, I wouldn't call them a technician! Anyway, now about 300miles and I see the reservoir fluid is getting a little dark. Makes me wonder if the guy just removed and replaced my reservoir fluid and with some driving, I'm getting some old fluid exchange making it get dark. They did charge me for a "fluid exchange kit". My other two cars the brake fluid is still almost clear after thousands of miles. I let the service manager know about this and he came back with a free oil change offer for my trouble. I wouldn't let them TOUCH my vehicle for an oil change - wrong oil, too tight on the filter, stripped drain bolt - now I'm paranoid :).

Back to the subject - Anyone know if the brake system is properly drained and refilled if there should be any discoloration after a few hundred miles?
Welcome to the "He Man Stealership Haters club"....lol. HMSHC <---- we need stickers :p

I believe there are some good technicians out there, but for every one, there seem's to be two half-arse'ers.

Anytime they want to charge me for tooling or kits, I request the tool/kit as I paid for it!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
164 Posts
So no, the fluid should be super clear if the while line was flushed.

Take it back and let them know they didn't flush the lines and calipers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,620 Posts
So no, the fluid should be super clear if the while line was flushed.

Take it back and let them know they didn't flush the lines and calipers.
...... or maybe they didn't do it in the proper sequence? Either way, they blew it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
Pretty much normal dealer level maintenance quality, much better gong with a small independent place that cares to keep you as a customer. Dealers put so much time pressure on their mechanics as well as upsell services type pressure that the mechanics get jaded in a hurry.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,315 Posts
Most shop use an auto-bleeder. So no excuse for mixing with old fluid. Unless they are too lazy or too much in a hurry to do it right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for all the input - should have time later this week to check a bleeder valve for signs of loosening and if I can't tell will get a little fluid from one to see for sure.

....and yes, if I can do x I could do y but I chose not too due to reasons not worth going into here.

thanks ROC!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,081 Posts
It isn't quite time to flush the brakes in mine, so I haven't done it on the Ridge. I've done a whole lot of other vehicles, though. Bear that in mind here...

I have had many instances fresh brake fluid getting a darker/older look to it very quickly. There's normally some old fluid hanging around the folds of the rubber baffles so common in the reservoirs (I'm thinking mostly of motorcycles here), sometimes there's 'gunk' at the bottom of the reservoir that I can't get at to remove, or other things of that nature. How much darkening of the new fluid this produces seems to vary depending on the specific vehicle and situation, including how long it's been since the last service was performed (if ever). So what I'm saying is that, while I understand where you're coming from and why this would have your attention, my experience is that it's not automatically a sign of laziness or incompetence.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,443 Posts
I use my MityVac extractor for oil changes, transmission fluid (on cars with a decent sized dipstick pipe), power steering fluid, bleeding clutch fluid (manual transmissions), and brake fluid. I can slip a clear flexible hose that I get a Ace Hardware over the end of a small MityVac hose, attach it to the brake bleeder valve and change out a brake line's fluid in a hurry.




Here's a picture of me using the MityVac to bleed an usually hard to bleed hydraulic clutch system. I just slip a clear hose over the bleeder nipple and open the valve.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
579 Posts
I like it OwnerCS. I had a smaller version once, only used it 1 or 2 times then I let a buddy borrow it...... haven't seen it since...lol.
This will give me a reason to upgrade :homer:
 
  • Like
Reactions: Len

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Someone suggested "if you can drain your oil, you can flush the brakes". I disagree, and I did my first oil drain in 1960.

First you have to 1) get the truck up on 4 jacks stands and preferably remove all 4 tires. 2) attach a plastic hose to a bleed fitting that goes into a can or plastic bottle such that no air can get sucked back up the hose and into the system when you remove brake peddle pressure, 3) Open a bleed fitting and while an assistance stands ready over the main fluid reservoir with a fresh can of fluid, you pump the brakes to force out old fluid till it's clear, as your assistant adds fresh fluid. 4) once fluid is clear running out of the hose, quickly close the fitting, 5) move to the next wheel and repeat.

Shops have a thing they clamp over the master cyl that force feeds the new fluid in one swell foop making it a quick one man job. They probably let the fluid run out on the shop floor then just sweep it up with cat litter.

A little more complex than an oil change, and a big pain in the rear IMO (done it 2-3 times too many). This is $40 at a local independent in the Sac, CA area. Well worth it.

And to answer an earlier question, for me, the fluid remains clear and new looking for several years. I have always been disappointed with service at a dealer where it's assumed "to be done right". Same with coolant at the dealer: Drain the radiator (not the full system), top off, $200 please. i.e. no flush.
 

·
Super Moderator
2008 Ridgeline RTS in Billet Silver Metallic
Joined
·
22,589 Posts
It's been my experience that a lot of bleeding can be done before you need to top off the reservoir. You can easily find a magnetic catch can with the right sized hose to slip over the bleeder screw. No need to make a mess. Especially with two people doing the job.

If you don't have the right tools for the job, anything can be more difficult. In my area, indie shop rates are a minimum of $65/hr. Nobody will touch that job for $40. You found a great local deal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,620 Posts
We started doing this as teenagers, and as Speed says, if there are 2 of you, it's really not that hard.

Key is having a length of clear soft plastic tubing (clear so you can see when the fluid runs clear) to slip over the bleed port/valve & run into a drain can; and having someone to 'man' the brake pedal; and all the while one of you makes sure the reservoir stays at least 1/2 full (don't want to suck any air into the lines).

'Mostly just knowing the method and having assistance.

With ours of course, you also want to know the sequence as well (order of which wheels to do first).
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Top