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Premium Member
2010 RT - Bali Blue
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I finally had the time to change the brakes on my G5 Odyssey to the Brembo calipers off a Genesis Coupe R-spec. Since the current gen Odyssey, shares its front rotors with the current gen Ridgeline and the G2 Ridgeline and the current generation Pilot and Passport, the calipers dont share the same part number with the others (due to piston sizes being different), however, they are all interchangeable.

I have accumulated approximately 2600 miles on the van since the install about 3 weeks ago and put it through its paces.

I painted the calipers using VHT caliper paint and clear coat as I did not want the red calipers to stand out. In the attempts to take it to bare metal, I made many mistakes and it resulted in very poor caliper paint quality. - please don't judge.

Disclaimer: Anytime someone modifies or makes repair to their vehicle, they assume the risk of voiding their vehicle's mfgr's warranty and possibly damaging the vehicle or themselves if proper care is not taken. By following these suggestions, you are at your own risk as I do not assume responsibility of your install or safety.

Difficulty: Intermediate
Time: 3 hours (using a post lift). 4 hours if using jack stands and ground.


Parts Needed

  • Brake Caliper mounting bolt - M12-1.25 x 30mm class 10.9 bolt (M12-1.25 x 30mm DIN 961 Class 10.9 Zinc Finish Hex Cap Screw | Fastenal) – Qty 4
  • Brake Calipers – Front pair (NuGeon 97R00867B & 97R00867A OR OEM 58190-2MA10 and 58180-2MA10)
  • Brake Fluid – 600F or similar
  • Brake hardware kit – Qty 1 (Centric 117.51019 or equivalent)
  • Brake hose – Hyundai front Left and Right – Centric 15051088 and 15051087
  • Brake hose banjo bolt washer – Qty 4 (Honda #46472-568-000)
  • Brake Hose/caliper bolt – Hyundai OEM# 58726-1G000 or equivalent
  • Brake Pads – front kit - Stoptech 308.10010 or equivalent
  • Brake Rotor – Front pair ( Centric 127.40075R and 127.40075L or equivalent)
  • Caliper to knuckle bushing - Uxcell 14mmx12mmx15mm Self-lubricating Oilless Bearing Sleeve Composite Bushings – Qty 4 (to compensate for OEM 14mm to the Hyundai’s 12mm bolt diameter)
  • Stainless Steel brake rotor set screws

Tools needed
  • 10mm brake line wrench (flare nut wrench)
  • 3/8” and ½” drive ratchets
  • Anti-Seize lubricant (Permatex 80078 or equivalent)
  • Assorted sockets 10mm to 19mm
  • Brake bleeder kit (OEMTOOLS 25036) for one-person operation
  • Brake caliper hangers or equivalent
  • Brake parts cleaner
  • Brake parts lubricant (Permatex 24125 or similar)
  • Breaker bar
  • Diagonal pliers
  • Disc Brake pad spreader (like an ATP Disc Brake pad tool)
  • Fluid extractor pump – rated for transmission and brake fluid (Aleko OEXP02 or similar)
  • Small hammer
  • Liquid penetrant – WD40 or equivalent
  • Metal shears
  • Oil drain pan (like a HyperTough 7QDP-19-BLK)
  • Pry bar – 8in or equivalent
  • Screw driver – flat head (medium/heavy duty)
  • Shop rags
  • Torque wrench
  • Thread sealant - Loctite Blue
  • Wire brush – steel bristles
  • Zip Ties – 75LBF rated 8in zip ties

If rebuilding the Brembo caliper, you need the following or its equivalent.
  • Brake bleeder – Qty 4 (RAYBESTOS S22163)
  • Brake caliper piston repair kit - Qty 2 (Centric 143.34032)
    • There are many videos on YouTube on rebuilding calipers. Follow the process there to change out the seals

NOTES (must read first)
  • OEM wheels DO NOT clear the calipers as they are much larger than OEM calipers. Must use aftermarket wheels with a minimum spoke-to-caliper clearance of 2mm. I run MB Wheels - Crux 18 x 8.5 +42mm offset in the pictures below and it clears the calipers with 3mm to spare.
  • I DO NOT recommend using wheel spacers of any sort
  • DO NOT USE the copper washers for the banjo bolt. Use the OEM Honda ones from the parts list above
  • DO NOT USE basic brake pad and rotors with the Brembo caliper modification. Must use matched high-performance rotors and pads
  • RECOMMEND upgrading the rear brake rotor and pads to high performance units to balance the front - like the PowerStop Z36 kit (K7727-36).
  • Using high temp brake fluid is a must to cope with higher heat. It will be easy to boil the OEM Honda fluid in this setup
  • 500ml of brake fluid is more than adequate to complete bleeding of all four calipers
  • Front brake rotors I used are NOT for the G5 Odyssey/G2 Ridgeline, but for the G1 Honda Ridgeline. The physical rotor size is the same between these vehicles, but I recommend using the G2 appropriate rotors from the parts list above.
  • Use only Class 10 (10.9) caliper bolts. DO NOT USE class 8 (8.8) from the local auto parts/hardware stores. In the M12-1.25 configuration, zinc plated Class 8.8 has a max torque limit of 70 lb-ft (approx.) and the Class 10.9 has a max limit of 99 lb-ft. The caliper bolt needs to be torqued down to 75.9 lb-ft and using a class 8.8 will place the bolts beyond their max working limits.
  • If the caliper is purchased from a salvage yard, I recommend rebuilding the caliper, if it shows extreme disuse or abuse.
  • When you are rebuilding the caliper, you need to use extreme care as to not scar or damage the caliper pistons. These 42mm pistons are on backorder and I ordered the last 2 remaining units from Centric (mfg 07/15) between 4 different online retailers who listed as available.
  • Having access to a post lift saves about 1 hr of labor time.
  • Clean and dry new brake rotors according to manufacturer recommendations
  • If the brake rotor set screw breaks, drill out the broken piece and chase the threads with a tap.
  • Hyundai Gen R-spec front calipers are trailing, while the G2 Ridgeline is leading. Due to same size caliper pistons in each caliper, you will use the DR side Brembo caliper on the Passenger side of the truck. PAX side Brembo caliper will be installed on the driver side – Bleed screws will be pointed up.
  • Use the oil drain pan to catch the brake fluid that would spill from each front corner when swapping brake lines
  • Using the Genesis R-spec flex brake lines is not required, but recommended. If using the OEM Ridgeline hose, ensure that you use the Ridgeline banjo bolt with new washers.
  • Use a fluid extractor pump to remove all the old brake fluid from the master cylinder and top off the reservoir with new brake fluid.
  • Always keep an eye on the brake fluid level in the master cylinder reservoir and never let it go empty. If it does, then the master cylinder needs to be bench bled separately and reinstalled in the vehicle before continuing.
  • High performance brake rotors are usually directional. Ensure you install the rotors on the correct side.
  • You can do this same exact process, using same exact parts on a G1, opting for the G1 specific rotors.


Front Brakes
  • Ensure vehicle is secure on the lift or on jack stands
  • Spray liquid penetrant on the flare nuts and let it soak

Caliper install
  • Remove the brake hose retaining bolt located on the strut
  • Remove caliper by removing the two caliper hanger bolts
  • Secure the caliper using a caliper hanger
  • Remove the front brake rotor and clean the rotor mating surface with the wire brush
  • Remove 1” of metal from the top leading edge of the dust shield.
  • Apply anti-seize on the hub (rotor mating surface) and secure the correct rotor to the hub using the stainless-steel set screw (do not use old ones)
  • Install the Genesis brake hose to the Brembo calipers, using the banjo bolt washer and torqueing the bolt to 21.7 lb-ft. NOTE: the hook portion that goes into the caliper needs to be in and the banjo should be flush against the caliper, before it is torqued.
  • Slide the Uxcell bushing onto the M12-1.25 bolt and apply Blue Loctite to the exposed threads.
  • Install the Brembo caliper (bleeder facing up) to the G2 knuckle using the bolts and torque them both to 75.9 lb-ft. (NOTE: apply only a small amount of Loctite and do not let the liquid dry. Install and torque promptly)
  • Apply brake lubricant on the caliper pistons
  • Install the brake pads and secure them using the brake hardware kit (image below)
  • Repeat the same for the other side
Tire Wheel Vehicle Automotive tire Hood
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Connecting front brake lines to the G2 Hard lines
  • Using the flat head screwdriver, remove the retaining clip and ensure the hose is dislodged and can freely move up and down.
  • Remove the OEM flare nut from the OEM flex hose using the 10mm flare-nut wrench and remove the OEM caliper and hose out of the way.
  • Quickly hang the Brembo caliper and install the flex hose to the OEM hardline and tighten the flare-nut to the hose. Tighten to 12.3 lb-ft.
  • Reinstall the retaining clip and ensure the hose is secure and not twisted (image below).
  • Secure the flex line to the strut by using two zip ties to secure it to the mount (as pictured below). NOTE: ensure that there is enough slack in the hose between the caliper and the strut under full turns and that the hose is not strained or pinched under full steering lock (like image below).
  • Repeat the same for the other side.
  • Use brake parts cleaner to clean any brake fluid residue on parts.
Automotive tire Motor vehicle Rim Bicycle part Gas
Wheel Tire Train Automotive tire Vehicle
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Bleeding the brakes
  • Bleeding sequence is as follows. Though it seems unconventional, this is the sequence advised in the service manual
#1 Front Driver Side​
#2 Front Passenger Side​
#3 Rear Passenger side​
#4 Rear Driver side.​

  • When bleeding the Brembo calipers, start from the inner bleed valve and then move to the outer bleed valve.
  • Bleed the fluid till the its is clear, while ensuring proper amount of fluid is left in the master cylinder reservoir
  • I used the two person method, but using the one-person-bleed-kit would also suffice
  • Top off the fluid to the max line, check for leaks, clean up, install the wheels and take it for a slow speed test drive
  • Recheck for leaks and rectify as needed.

Bedding the brakes
  • This is a very critical step and you MUST follow the brake pad mfgr’s recommendation of the bedding process.
  • Now you can be satisfied with firm pedal feel and confident braking. Plus, it looks cool.
Tire Wheel Car Vehicle Automotive tire


Lastly, I am almost certain, I switched the front rotors. I will find some time over the summer to swap the rotors to their correct side.
 

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2010 RT - Bali Blue
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4,750 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Brian and I really hope your schedule allows you to get back to tackling the Wilwoods.

The brake feel is night and day. Due to better thermal management, virtually there is no fade, even with the stock size rotors squeezed by these goliaths. Pedal modulation is very linear, the dead pedal/mushy feel is completely gone, the brakes engage even at the slight tap of the brake so scrubbing speed is a walk in the park.

Due to lack of time, I ended up getting the ceramic pads as the pads I had were stock style pads (misunderstood them for semi metallic). The next time around, I would surely invest in the semi metallic pads and see how it is. I still feel the lack of noticeable initial bite, but under 3 seconds of same pedal depression distance, the friction seems to increase due to the pads/rotor warming up. Overall, I am enjoying it very much and glad the pulsation and mushy feel have gone. The rear pads on the vans had about 2mm left and the fronts were about half done - the van had 70,000 miles when I pulled them off, so its impressive how crappy the pedal feel was, even with that much pad left. Then I looked at the rotors and realized they were the culprits.


Below is the front rotor (both looked about the same) and the inner friction surface looked like garbage and probably the cause of the pulsation.


Tire Wheel Automotive tire Synthetic rubber Tread
 

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I did the Pilot front caliper / rotor upgrade on my 1.5G RL. Even with stainless lines, bitey Green EBC pads all around, new rotors all around and a new brake booster, I never could get the pedal feel good. I even bought the scantool to pulse the ABS chambers free of air.

I always speculated that the booster wasn't big enough to give the pressure to the larger front pots and still give what it needed to the rears, because the 1G RL, the rear rotors were larger than the fronts, and the brake bias was actually something like 40/60 - favoring the rear.

How is pedal and hard braking with these big fellows on there?

I have monster brembo 6 pots on my SLK roadster, and they'll "brake" your neck, but the rear 4 pots are the size of most car front brakes.
 

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2010 RT - Bali Blue
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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
@Aaron Gillum , the pedal feel is very similar to my Rotora setup, but not as potent just because of the BBK design of the latter.

The G5 Odyssey is 4593 lbs with a 55%/45% Front/Rear weight distribution and my G1 is 4504lbs with a 58%/42% weight distribution. In addition to those numbers, what I noticed in both the G1 and the G5 was this one issue, the rear brake pads wears much faster than the fronts. My Odyssey, at 70K miles, had maybe about 1mm pad material left in the rear, while front had about 15% left. I saw very similar behavior on my 2008 Accord, which had the EBD introduced which started to brake the rear more to keep the nose dive to a minimum.

I have mentioned this in other threads, but I truly believe the firmness of the OEM braking system is isolated to the large Honda vehicle. The current gen Pilot, Odyssey, Ridgeline and my G1 are all plagued with it. I do not have that 'mushy' feel in my '05 TL, in my dad's '09 Fit and it was absent in my '08 Accord and my '16 Civic. They all had rather firm pedal feel.

My pedal feel on the G5 after the caliper upgrade is firm. The combination of High performance brake rotor, 600F brake fluid, high performance brake pads, and an opposed piston one piece caliper, I feel the 'bite' about 2 seconds after the pad contacts the rotor due to the pads being ceramic and the rotors being very cold. I plan to change it to a semi-metallic unit in the next brake service.

The pedal travel is about an inch, before I feel the pad contacting the rotor and the brake friction increase is very linear and very proportional to the brake pedal travel. By pure mechanics and design of how the brake actuator and the booster works, scrubbing speed from highway speeds is mind boggling. I am happy with it so far and wanted to extensively explore highway and city driving characteristics before I wanted to advocate it to others.
After all, this is not a 'brake kit' put together by StopTech or Brembo or GWR, it is a piece meal by a fellow member and folks are generally very apprehensive about such things.
 

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2014 Sport
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I did the Pilot front caliper / rotor upgrade on my 1.5G RL. Even with stainless lines, bitey Green EBC pads all around, new rotors all around and a new brake booster, I never could get the pedal feel good. I even bought the scantool to pulse the ABS chambers free of air.

I always speculated that the booster wasn't big enough to give the pressure to the larger front pots and still give what it needed to the rears, because the 1G RL, the rear rotors were larger than the fronts, and the brake bias was actually something like 40/60 - favoring the rear.

How is pedal and hard braking with these big fellows on there?

I have monster brembo 6 pots on my SLK roadster, and they'll "brake" your neck, but the rear 4 pots are the size of most car front brakes.
I have the MDX setup on my 14 and I would say that the pedal feel is much better than stock but not as firm as one finds on sportier vehicles. I did not replace the master cylinder or the brake lines. I did find that it was extremely difficult to get all the air out of the system. I used a combination of a compressed air vacuum bleeder and the old fashioned two person method but it still didn't feel right. I eventually had a local shop use their professional brake bleeding equipment made by BG to do a final fluid bleeding. The end result was a noticeably firmer pedal.
Perhaps there is still room for improvement in your setup?

Smufguy, Thank you for the great writeup! Sorry to hear about your poor experiences with Rotora. If I hadn't already done the MDX front brakes I would be all over this Brembo calipered option. Infact, if it didn't require larger wheels I would be seriously tempted to try it out! Nice job!

PS: Do you know for a fact that won't fit with the stock 18" alloys (09+ Sports, RTLs, SE's etc)?
 

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2010 RT - Bali Blue
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
PS: Do you know for a fact that won't fit with the stock 18's alloys (09+ Sports, RTLs, SE's etc)?
I dont know if the 18" G1 wheels will clear it. I can try out the 17" one I have, but that wont be for quite a while. I have to be creative as I only have a CTS-V caliper to play with.

The stock 19inch wheels in my 2019 Odyssey did not come close to clearing them and those wheels are +50mm offset. Since the Gen 2s are +55mm offset and the spoke design is very similar across the Odyssey and Ridgeline (and pilot and passport) which is a very upright spoke design, they wont clear it either. The HPDs are +45mm so there is very small hope that it may clear it, but cannot confirm.

However, I can confirm that the '07-'09 MDX Tech wheels (42700STXA01, below) can clear it with no issues. These wheels clear my Rotora setup as well.

 

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I might just put up a wheel fitment chart here and have folks do it themselves :D
I am not sure how to measure for the clearance but I would be happy to put my finesse with a tape measure to use on my wheels if that is helpful.
 

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2010 RT - Bali Blue
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I am not sure how to measure for the clearance but I would be happy to put my finesse with a tape measure to use on my wheels if that is helpful.
I should have said it is a template, not a chart 😔. You print the template to 100% scale, glue it to a cardboard and cut it out. Then you use that to measure the clearance.
Folks use the template during their wheel buying process to ensure proper fitment wheel is being recommended to the buyer.
 
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