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Not according to the article, and if you believe everything you read.
 

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From the Owners Manual, page 174:

"Some gasoline today is blended with oxygenates such as ethanol or MTBE. Your vehicle is designed to operate on oxygenated gasoline containing up to 10 percent ethanol by volume and up to 15 percent MTBE by volume. Do not use gasoline containing methanol."
 

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DO NOT use that fuel in your ridgeline it will do allot of damage, the engine has to be specifically designed to run on both gas and methonal allot of ford cars can run on both i think its called evf design
 

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The wording on the question is, "can the Ridgeline run on E85 fuel?" The answer is yes it CAN run on E85, but E85 is NOT approved for use in any Honda vehicle.

Will E85 cause damage? I don't know. You might end up with some clogged or damaged fuel injectors. The ECU may throw the fuel/air mixture off quite a bit. Maybe other problems.

Will I run E85? Only in an emergency. I've seen and talked to people that use E85 in vehicles not designed for it all the time. I'd probably be the one that had problems... not the guy pumping into his 1985 Chevy van.

-Joe
 

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Just watched the documentary "pump" on Amazon. Sounds like its a software issue, no parts are different. This was the first link I found on ROC about e85. Thought I would see if anyone has added a kit yet, or adjusted their software.
 

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Just watched the documentary "pump" on Amazon. Sounds like its a software issue, no parts are different. This was the first link I found on ROC about e85. Thought I would see if anyone has added a kit yet, or adjusted their software.
I just saw the same documentary. Very intriguing. I do believe it is all software driven too. Apparently any non flexfuel vehicle 1996 and newer(OBD 2), can be converted by tweaking the ECU settings or more simply installing a flexkit and run E85 happily. No mechanical parts are different between a flexfuel or non flexfuel vehicle according to a Ford engineer.

Your MPG suffers on biofuels but if its cheaper and better for our lungs, it makes sense to me. It seems like it will be a while before the oil giants give us any other fuel options at the pump.

It looks like this is the flexkit for the Ridgeline.
 

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This could quite possibly be the oldest thread bring-back of all time - almost TEN years. Wow.
 

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It is not generally correct to say that no parts are different between FF and non-FF vehicles, IME. There are exceptions, of course, but typically the non-FF vehicles do not have sufficiently large injectors, such that when run on alcohol (E-85), and assuming the ECU is re-programmed CORRECTLY (highly unusual, again IME), the injectors cannot keep up with demand. This means they're running at 100% duty cycle, which dumps fuel at the wrong time, and yet still results in too-lean AFRs. Driving around town it's often not an issue, but pulling a load, driving up big hills (mountains), and things such as that will cause trouble. It is common to have to replace the fuel pump, too, again in order to be able to deliver sufficient fuel.

The domestic brands may well do a better job 'universalizing' parts between FF and non-FF vehicles. They push alcohol much harder than the Japanese makes.

I've run E-85 in a non-FF turbocharged Japanese vehicle for a couple thousand miles before, in which I already knew the injectors would flow enough fuel, but which needed new fueling maps (and also really needed a new fuel pump, or at least a different Fuel Pressure Regulator). It ran fine most of the time, but it would not idle when cold, and it was significantly too-lean under WOT operation, even at altitude. I also had some o-rings in the fuel rail go south on me a year or two later. Probably coincidence, but possibly not. That failure resulted in raw gasoline being leaked out over the top of the engine. It was not the best situation I could have thought of/hoped for.

In short, my experienced opinion is that, IN GENERAL, you're unlikely to cause significant damage or problems from throwing some E-85 into a very late-model vehicle once, particularly now that E-85 may have as little as 51% alcohol in it. That said, you're not saving anything at all, leastways the environment, and you _may_ cause significant damage to some components over time.
 
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