Honda Ridgeline Owners Club Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I looked around to see how to change the antifreeze the other day, and, without removing the splash shield, it seems like it would take a very weird-shaped pair of pliers to get to the draincock.

QUESTION #1) Do you guys remove the splash shield to change the antifreeze, like the manual says?

If so, QUESTION #2) Can you generally reuse the push tabs which affix the splash shield, or do you have to use new ones every time you do this?

QUESTION #3) Where do you guys get those push tabs, from the dealer, or do you just use some aftermarket ones that you can get elsewhere? The aftermarket onese seem to be about $1 a piece.

QUESTION #4) If you DON'T remove the splash shield, what tool do you guys use to get to that draincock? I tried just my fingers, and I could NOT get it loose that way. If you have the tool, can you post a picture of it for me?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,764 Posts
There is a radiator drain slot in the engine splash shield... Is this the opening you used?

Why do you want to change it out? It is supposed to be good for 10 years.

(Pics from Truckin')

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I'm insane about antifreeze. I always have changed it in my cars every two years. The point is that I can't loosen this draincock with my fingers through that hole, and would like to avoid having to remove the splash shield to get to it with my conventional pliers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Good news! I hunted around the other day for a special tool to reach the draincock. It turns out a small pair of channel locks does the trick for me. But, in general, the absolutely perfect tool for this purpose is a pair of 90-degree-bent, needle-nose pliers. That will operate the draincock in any orientation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
489 Posts
Good news! I hunted around the other day for a special tool to reach the draincock. It turns out a small pair of channel locks does the trick for me. But, in general, the absolutely perfect tool for this purpose is a pair of 90-degree-bent, needle-nose pliers. That will operate the draincock in any orientation.
Was the antifreeze dirty or rusty when you removed it? What year is your truck and how many miles are on it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I haven't changed it yet: that's next month. I am fanatical about changing antifreeze every two years. Spent much of my early life replacing leaky heater cores and rariators, and learned my lesson from that. I'm almost certain it'll be like new every time I change it, before and after.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
I haven't changed it yet: that's next month. I am fanatical about changing antifreeze every two years. Spent much of my early life replacing leaky heater cores and rariators, and learned my lesson from that. I'm almost certain it'll be like new every time I change it, before and after.

What anti-freeze are you planning to use? I'm a bit partial to water wetter, but wouldn't mind hearing what is working for non-performance minded cars.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,576 Posts
What anti-freeze are you planning to use? I'm a bit partial to water wetter, but wouldn't mind hearing what is working for non-performance minded cars.
My new Ridgeline was delivered low on antifreeze and the service manager said any good quality 50/50 mix green antifreeze would work fine to top it off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,016 Posts
My new Ridgeline was delivered low on antifreeze and the service manager said any good quality 50/50 mix green antifreeze would work fine to top it off.
If I were you, I'd spend the extra money and buy silicate-free 100k mile antifreeze. The best stuff is pre-mixed with DISTILLED water. Toyota and Honda anti-freezes are top-quality, but I'm sure you can also find comparable aftermarket antifreeze. If you use non-premixed antifreeze, I'd advise you to use distilled water to top off the radiator. The dissolved solvents in tap water can do a number on the radiator over time. I don't have a Honda service manual, but Lexus/Toyota engines had a petcock (10 mm bolt) that allowed you to drain the entire block as well as the radiator. In my experience, almost as much water was in the cooling ports of the engine as was in the radiator. Leaving all the old antifreeze in the block almost defeats the purpose of the radiator flush.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,126 Posts
If the RL is anything like my 99 Accord you have to bleed the system or it will overheat. Basically you have to burp it.:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Hi guys;
I realize these posts are old, however, I got the urge to change the anti-freeze in my RL this past weekend. Actually, half the anti-freeze. Only did the radiator. My RL is 4-1/2 yrs old, 41k miles. I was quite surprised by the cost of Honda anti-freeze. Also, have to say I've never seen blue anti-freeze before. Learned the owner manual was correct in stating the qty. in the radiator.

I have a few questions:
-Is the block drain at the back of the engine, about midline and above, to the left of the oil filter? How the hell do you get to it?
-Saw it mentioned that the anti-freeze is good for 10 yrs. Is this good info.? "Reason I ask is the owners manual "recommends" something else.
-Read the posting about access to the radiator drain. I have to agree, the access is tight. I could not loosen by hand. Ended up using a small pair of needle nose pliers, however, I am concerned about it being tight enough. It appears to be in the same orientation as before loosening, i.e. tabs vertical. Sound right?
-Is there something I might be missing or is the draining of the radiator still as simple as it used to be? Todays vehicles are so sophisticated, I feel as if there might be something I'm missing for what appears to be a simple task.

Any thoughts, suggestions would help confirm my feelings about nthis simple task. Thanks!

By the way, I just love this truck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
This past week, I changed the antifreeze -- pretty easy. The draincock is most easily accessed with a long, 90-degree-bend needle nose plier. I didn't have to remove any splash guards or anything. After that drained completely, I tightened the draincock back ONLY with my fingers as tightly as I could, WITHOUT USING ANY TOOLS. That way, I feel like it's tight enough but not too tight. After this, I would be unable to loosen it with my fingers only, so my assumption is that it isn't going to loosen up. Lifted the overflow tank right out to change that, then crawled under the passenger, front side, behind the wheel to get to the block drain. As far as I remember, it's above and behind the oil filter, and is a small (12mm?) brass nut that has a small nipple extending from its center, to which I connected a hose to carry away tht coolant when it drained. This brass nut is screwed into another steel nut that goes into the block. I loosened this and waited for it to drain completely. Then I retightened it to a little bit beyond the spec (7.2ftlbs). Next, I slowly refilled the radiator with what seemed like 1.75gallons, which included refilling the overflow. The manual says to let the engine then run for two fan cycles, but I only let it run for maybe 20-25 minutes. I saw no leaks, and just kept topping it off gently. No problems so far. In case you don't think of this, never run a car without a full load of antifreeze, even for a moment. Even if you do so briefly to not overheat the engine, running the water pump dry like that will seriously damage its seal and bearing, almost certainly requring its replacement.

Ridge on!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
when draining the block using the small drain on the back of the engine you will only get half the antifreeze out as i had found out . I took the blockheater out of the front side after draining the back and got another two to three litres out all over me !! Am doing the timing belt and water pump trick with new idler pulleys -- what a job !! But looks like i didn't screw up anything as she runs nice as always .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
My RL had a motor swap done by the dealer before I purchased it. It appears they put in standard green coolant. Manual says not to use green coolant. After doing some research, it seems as though the green coolant isnt bad to use, as long as you change it according to the schedule with green vs the blue (long lasting) coolant. I was thinking of switching it to Blue, but it seems more involved to get all the Green out...block, heater core etc. Would leaving the green really cause damage like the manual states?
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top