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Discussion Starter #1
Maybe you have a moment, a window cradle, and can take some readings just because you are curious how well you did with your install. Please don't do this during rush hour, maybe if you are on a road trip or out of traffic ;)

I thought if I started this thread then people might also remember to check some readings before and after. I added my old moon roof wind visor readings below.

Why:
Don't you want to know how your install compares and how well you did? :D
I have now decided I am going to try and make my ridge more soundproof. I can't have a conversation over bluetooth above 50 mph vs my wife's car. As a valet in college I can tell you there really is a difference between Honda's and luxury cars, but the ridge is not too bad and by no means a tin can however if you have been in a "luxury's vacuum" you know what I am talking about; it's like sitting at the pool on vacation:cool: So I started looking into options, reading posts, etc. On that note, how would I know what really works best materials, locations, not missing something while the interior is out, etc, unless there was some testing done on our trucks, at the least knowing some numbers might get me an idea of what I would want, in the end I think I will have to "overbuild" though and use as many options as possible.

But for those that have done it already, it will be hard to correlate my readings with yours. Phone, app, and driving conditions would matter, but maybe we can find people with similar phones (Samsung or iphone). use 70 mph as a general number, on a cement freeway, and look for the highest db and average numbers.

However if there was a big enough database of user input we could possibly get some useful information on things we have done for comparison. Maybe we can put all our sound issues in one place so people have ideas like the window sail trims, roof rack tabs not against the window seal, etc. I hope for this because I have spent 3 hours reading and have only read through a few full threads.

Phone used:
Type of materials used:
or fix done
locations installed:
type of road if not a cement freeway:

before if possible - db:
after - db:

I have a LG G3 but my Note 2 would probably have a similar microphone to most Samsung smartphones. I can also get a friend's Iphone and Samsung s5 to compare against my phones so we have an idea of how the microphones differ if much at all

For android lets use Sound Meter just bc that's the app used for the readings I started on earlier.

Note: 10db is twice as loud, well that's what my research has found.
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
OEM Moon Roof Visor db Results WITH THE ROOF OPEN:

Phone: Note 2
Visor on - cruise on at 70 mph = 69 to a max of 71 db depending on road bumps and wind changes
Visor off - cruise on at 70 mph = 76 to max of 78 db depending on road bumps and wind changes

With the back window open it decreased noise 1 to 2 db depending on wind and road noises
 

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What's your baseline reading with everything buttoned up? I'm curious as to how loud your vehicle is that prohibits a Bluetooth conversation because I do it all the time with no soundproofing beyond OEM.
 

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Also post what app you're using. That might make a difference too.
 

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At work a few months ago, we had the need to measure the SPL of a combustion air blower for OSHA compliance on a piece of equipment we were manufacturing. I brought my personal RadioShack sound level meter that I've used for years to calibrate surround sound setups. I also compared my iPhone 6 running an app called "Measures" that includes a sound level tool. Various employees compared their assortment of Android-based smartphones. We positioned each device at the same distance and location from the blower. We found that the RadioShack meter and my iPhone 6 read within 1 to 3 dB of a NIST-certificated Extech sound level meter. The other smartphones were "all over the map" - often 5 to 10 db off. Most surprising was one employees's Android phone was more accurate with its built-in microphone than it was with an external microphone and matching app that was designed specifically for "accurate" sound level measurements. I'm afraid accuracy and repeatability will vary too much to gather any meaningful information for the OP's purpose.
 

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I have one of those Rat Shack SPL meters too.. and used for calibrating home theater systems. At least, that's what I used to do with it. Been so long, I barely remember how to use it. Let alone the custom software I bought for that purpose!
 

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I did a mostly-complete lining of the interior of my RL (firewall was the only exception, as I didn't want to pull the dashboard). I used a single layer of Dynamat Extreme on the floor, doors, back wall, and roof.

I saw about a 3db drop in the A-Weighting noise - I used the wrong range on my Radio Shack meter - should have used C-Weighting. Ooops. This was on residential + rural asphalt roads at speeds under 50 mph.

Subjectively, the RL became significantly quieter and I was able to make hands-free calls without having to raise my voice. Performance of the aftermarket stereo was also improved, especially the bass since the Dynamat is a vibration dampener.

Chip H.

EDIT:
If I were to do it again, I'd add (on top of the Extreme) their foam padding to the floor (Dynaliner). I think that would block more of the mid to high frequencies.

Some people will line the hood: I think this is a waste of time on the RL, as engine noise isn't a big issue - road noise is.

3dB, since it's a logarithmic scale, means that the sound energy is half what it was before. So it's a very big change.
 

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I did a mostly-complete lining of the interior of my RL (firewall was the only exception, as I didn't want to pull the dashboard). I used a single layer of Dynamat Extreme on the floor, doors, back wall, and roof.

I saw about a 3db drop in the A-Weighting noise - I used the wrong range on my Radio Shack meter - should have used C-Weighting. Ooops. This was on residential + rural asphalt roads at speeds under 50 mph.

Subjectively, the RL became significantly quieter and I was able to make hands-free calls without having to raise my voice. Performance of the aftermarket stereo was also improved, especially the bass since the Dynamat is a vibration dampener.

Chip H.
That is good evidence that demonstrates that overall sound pressure level alone isn't very meaningful. More meaningful is the frequency distribution and an individual's perception of sound. Some people are more sensitive to higher frequency wind noise while others are more perceptive of low frequency tire noise. You can have two different vehicles with identical SPL readings while one is perceived to be "noisy" and the other "quiet" depending on the frequency distribution. Also, when you reduce certain frequencies others become unmasked and potentially more annoying than what you had before you started making alterations. Acoustics are an incredible challenge for automakers - mostly science, part art, and part luck. :)
 

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A before and after on the SAME VEHICLE and in the same location would provide valuable results. Comparing "afters" on different vehicles will be problematic. In particular road noise is dramatically affected by the tire type and condition they are in as well as the type and condition of the road surface.

In my personal experience changing from the stock Michelin LTXs (17" wheels) to a different tire made a huge difference in reducing road noise.
 

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What tire did you change to?
 

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First to Michelin Lattitude tours. They were MUCH quieter than the LTXs but didn't do quite as well in the snow. Both the LTXs and Lattitudes developed significant sidewall cracking and the Lattitudes began to delaminate at the tread; all before useful treadlife was up. I now have a set of Firestone Destination LE2s which are about as quiet as the Lattitudes and did great in the snow this winter.

Overall, the Ridge does seem to be lacking in sound deadening / road noise isolation so as a result, picking a quiet tire (if noise levels are a priority) is important. For noise concerns, change your tires first and then consider a sound deadening upgrade. If you are into car audio, the sound deadening upgrade is certainly an important part of the process.

A lot of people swear by the stock LTXs and by the same token a lot of people complain about road noise in the Ridge. I find my Ridge is pretty quiet. Hopefully the Destinations will stay quiet throughout their life and hopefully they will last.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Phone: LG G3
App: Android "Sound meter" app
Tire pressure just filled.
Oem Michelin tires w about 9000 miles
66-68db cement freeway
72-74db on connecting joints of bridges/sections
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Perception does not play into this if people on the other end of my phone cannot hear me. I am unable to use voice commands above 50mph on multiple phones vs my wife's car. OP was to figure out differences in materials used. Tires will change after they are no longer new, your readings before and after would be interesting for those looking to purchase Someone with the same phone can also compare their readings and so on, then we have an idea of basic differences, not perceptions. I agree its not accurate across different phones or roads, but maybe knowing about this post will remind people to take "before" readings. 70mph on cement seems like the best option to standardize.

Sound deadoning would actually be cheaper than than new quality tires. Esp if MLV is all you were going to do. $200 for 4' x 100' of virgin quality rubber on Amazon.

Sent from my phone
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Also dont forget I can ask other friends to ride w their phones on to match yours. Others may also already have readings as one person already provided which is beneficial.

I may also have something wrong, I was riding to work and I could def hear wind at 50 mph; I'm thinking I may have the "roof rack channel cover issue" (creates a loud wind noise if its not under the window seal a little) , but how would I truly know the noise decrease without readings ;) then its just perception. I'll see how it looks up there after work. I'm sure it wont make it sound like a luxury car though.
 

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Sound deadoning would actually be cheaper than than new quality tires. Esp if MLV is all you were going to do. $200 for 4' x 100' of virgin quality rubber on Amazon.

Sent from my phone
Not if you pay someone to do it!
Also keep in mind that tires wear out and will need to be replaced. At that point, if noise is a concern then there is a lot of room for reducing real world sound levels by changing to a different tire. Overall, stopping noise at the source will probably net the best real world results regardless of what you DB meter says. . . .
Quiet tires and a thorough sound deadening / insulating job would no doubt make for a peaceful driving Ridge.
 

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Also dont forget I can ask other friends to ride w their phones on to match yours. Others may also already have readings as one person already provided which is beneficial.

I may also have something wrong, I was riding to work and I could def hear wind at 50 mph; I'm thinking I may have the "roof rack channel cover issue" (creates a loud wind noise if its not under the window seal a little) , but how would I truly know the noise decrease without readings ;) then its just perception. I'll see how it looks up there after work. I'm sure it wont make it sound like a luxury car though.
Do you have the roof rack? Get rid of it if you care about wind noise. If you are just talking about the channel covers then you might consider using some painters tape to cover over areas that you suspect are an issue. Go for a drive and see if you made an improvement or a "change" in the sound you are hearing. Repeat until you find your culprit and then figure out what to do about it permanently. . .
 

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Discussion Starter #17
There was a gap between the roof rail and window trim, but I saw no change in noise and the phone was still had 66db at the lowest; but I digressed with that issue. To the OP, readings would be good to hear from those with sound proofing worked on.
 

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Not if you pay someone to do it!
Given the amount of work it took to install - I could never afford to pay someone to install it for me. It was 2-1/2 loooong days.

Chip H.
 
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