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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This is my first post, but I'm no stranger to Hondas and have been a lurker here for a while.

I am a Honda guy. First car was a Honda Prelude, every car since has been an Accord (7), wife drove a 99 Odyssey from new until last year, now she's back to driving an Accord. I won't consider anything else for a car or mini-van.

BUT - my daily driver is a 2000 F150 Ext Cab, long box 2wd with 4.6l V8.
Why? In 2000 when I bought it new, Honda did not sell any kind of truck. I had 4 teenage boys at home, was in the middle of a large reno, spent lots of time doing outdoor sports, and pulled a horse trailer several times a week. I needed a truck that could carry 6, haul bulky materials and pull 2 horses down the 401. I bought the stripped down Ford (power nothing, rubber mats) V8 long box truck and it's been a good reliable vehicle that has met my needs for 15 years and is still going strong.

Fast forward to now. 2 of my boys are away from home (taking 2 of my Accords with them) My reno projects are down to 2-3 a year. The horse trailer is still pulled monthly, but not as far, and I still have to transport 800lb hay bales every month. My Ford is getting older and when it needs replacing, I'm toying with picking up a used Ridgeline. (I'm not in the $$ market for new, so even if the 2016 models were out, they would be off the table.)

Why should I buy a Ridgeline instead of another Ford. What will I get that I don't have now, and what will I miss that I do?

More info
I couldn't care less about electronics and gadgets - and I've been driving the same route to work for 20 years- I can get there without NAV. Paved country road.
My F150 with V8 has averaged 16l/100km (or 14.7 US MPG) over the last 2 years including trailering.
My 2WD F150 ext cab long box SUCKS in snow and ice.
I keep my vehicles once I buy them - until the repair costs exceed replacement.
No off-roading
 

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My first thought was, what have you got to lose.

You are already sold on Honda quality and engineering. You are buying used, so your loss in value for depreciation will be low. I think the Ridgeline has the capacities to do everything you currently need.

Your trailering limit is 5000 lbs. with the RL, which is reduced by occupants and cargo...technically. A 2 horse trailer should not be a problem. Your highway mileage will be around 20, city around 16, trailering will hurt...10-12. Depends on how much of that you do.

You get Honda reliability which sounds like it will be similar to your Ford. If you can make the Ford last till next year, the new RL will come out, and the old ones should drop in price.

No problems.
 

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If you don't need the added 'heft' and better mileage along with more power, I would stick with the 'new' Ridgeline. At least check it out when it comes available. It 'should' do better on both counts, or I would not put much hope for it be competitive.

There is hardly a more flexible vehicle for the 'average' person than the RL unless you really need a truck with more power and are not concerned with fitting it comfortably in you garage, etc.
Not perfect, and Ford has improved, I would still go with Honda if reliability was my main objective.

Given all that, I would likely go domestic if I towed a lot. But again, I still don't know if the new RL will be better in that regard also.
 

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With as much Honda experience as you have you don't need me to tell you about reliability. I can't really offer much wisdom about the towing capability of the Ridgeline as I have only used mine to tow a john boat a couple of times. I would be curious if you could fit 800 pounds of hay bales in the Ridgeline's bed, especially with the tailgate closed.

Buying used removes the depreciation factor. Fuel mileage would probably be about a wash, with a slight advantage to the Ridgeline, unless you went with a Ford diesel to replace your current truck. I would assume that would increase acquisition costs significantly however.

For me, the increased comfort you'd likely realize with a Ridgeline would be welcome. Like you I don't really have need for navigation, nor blue tooth. But just having power windows and locks and a darn comfortable interior would sell me on the Ridgeline.

I do think you will miss the towing capabilities of a "proper" pick-up truck. You might miss the cargo capacity once in a while but if you aren't hauling building supplies etc every weekend I suspect the Ridgeline would be fine for your needs.

You will absolutely appreciate the AWD of the Ridgeline. Of course you can pick up a 4X4 Ford and solve that. But there is no comparison if you go back with 2WD for your replacement vehicle. Remember that the Ridgeline is not a true 4WD vehicle so if you needed any serious off road capability or a low range transfer case you might stick with Ford.

The Ridgeline is the perfect vehicle for me. Good luck with the search for YOUR perfect vehicle. Let us know what happens.
 

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This is my first post, but I'm no stranger to Hondas and have been a lurker here for a while.

I am a Honda guy. First car was a Honda Prelude, every car since has been an Accord (7), wife drove a 99 Odyssey from new until last year, now she's back to driving an Accord. I won't consider anything else for a car or mini-van
Honda guy here also; 12 Accords, 2 CR-Vs, 1 CT, and 3 RLs. I say go with the RL.
 

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Being a first time Honda owner (RL) and on here for ten years I get more of a feeling the ones that always buy Honda are afraid to buy anything else. Anyone of the others could blow it away and they still wouldn't do it. I guess things that happened fifteen, twenty or more years ago in a different truck or car still has a bad taste today. But they also say Honda is loosing it big time, cheaper this cheaper that, don't have this don't have that ect.... I guess a newer $hitty Honda is better then anything else. Are they hypocrites or what I'm confused. I'm a ten year guy and I've had mine for over ten years and its the best truck I've ever had but cant compare it to any of the new models coming out ten years newer with out driving it for some time MY WAY.
 

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Being a first time Honda owner (RL) and on here for ten years I get more of a feeling the ones that always buy Honda are afraid to buy anything else.
Don't forget those who had bad experiences with other vehicles, before they bought Hondas. Some fears are well founded although I've owned most makes at one time or another.
 

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I've had Toyota's, Ford's and Chevy's over the years with a Saab and VW mixed in. Toyota is hands down the best. Honda is pretty good too. I just like the practical way the Japanese do things. Cars from Europe are ridiculous in wanting you to figure things out instead of being user friendly and don't even mention the front wheel brake dust. American cars (and increasingly any car made in north america) have ridicuous minor things that you quickly notice a corner was cut.

OP you need a RL because it's comfy and the right size. It's pretty darn reliable and super practical. It would be very hard to go wrong with one and the AWD works in summer rain or winter snow all the same.
 

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Just to let you know 2009-up all modals come with factory hitch and trailer wiring. We've seen some electrical gremlins with aftermarket trailer wiring harness.
 

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Just to let you know 2009-up all modals come with factory hitch and trailer wiring. We've seen some electrical gremlins with aftermarket trailer wiring harness.
Incorrect. The Sports and RT' s did not have the harness, although they all have the hitch. If you get one without the harness you would be best off to bite the bullet and get the OEM harness.
 

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IMO
Based on my 2014 Ridgeline RTL
Note the balance of 4 each

Pro:
Sunroof (had major influence on my purchase decision)
Sliding rear window (nice, use it when weather permits, with sunroof)
XM radio (thank God for XM, especially Octane and comedy)
In bed trunk

Con:
Timing Belt
Maintenance Minder (worthless since I do maintenance on a mileage interval)
Unnecessary features (for me) like cruise and heated seats add to cost.
No USB port on radio

Disclaimer: That is my pro/con list :act030:
 

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Incorrect. The Sports and RT' s did not have the harness, although they all have the hitch. If you get one without the harness you would be best off to bite the bullet and get the OEM harness.

I needed a truck that could carry 6, haul bulky materials and pull 2 horses down the 401.
My F150 with V8 has averaged 16l/100km (or 14.7 US MPG) over the last 2 years including trailering.
I was presuming he lives in Ontario.The 401 hwy official name is the Macdonald–Cartier Freeway and fuel mileage in metric.So that makes me think he lives in Canada where all modals 2009-up come with factory hitch and trailer wiring.
 

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The Ridgeline will be a much more comfortable vehicle and more versatile. I am not a big gadget guy either but I really do appreciate the thoughtful technology that has been put in the vehicle and I bet you will too after you get used to it. The Ridgeline will not have the work capabilities of your Ford but it sounds like you know that. It may also be hard to find a good used one. There aren't that many of them out there to choose from compared to more popular vehicles. However, when you do find one, I think it's nice to be driving something that's kind of unique.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
General consensus seems to be that a Ridgeline will do everything I want it to including pulling the horse trailer occasionally.

northernlights is suggesting that the Ridgeline is behind newer vehicles in terms of gadgets and stuff, but then goes on to say that he has kept his 10 years and it's the best truck he ever had - so not sure I understand his message. I don't want the latest gadgets and technology. I want a good reliable vehicle with annual upkeep costs that are reasonable.

I look for Hondas because experience with Accords suggests Hondas are reliable. 3 of my boys have learned to drive on Std Accords, and all (the Accords) survived. My 3 teenage and twenties drivers are each now driving a 98-02 with from 225-325km on the odometer and annual costs are trivial (usual stuff - brakes, a sensor here, a wheel bearing there, fluids and filters regularly). I don't think twice about buying a 15yr old accord with 225km on it, 'cause I know it will go another 100km without any major problems, and I'm not worried my sons will get stranded somewhere. Hoping a Ridgeline would be the same.

I appreciate all the feedback so far. In terms of annual upkeep costs, how are the Ridgeline's doing once they approach 10 years and 200,000km? Will they do as well as my Accords have done? My F150 has averaged ~ $2000/yr for the last 3 yrs with me doing the regular maintenance and my mechanic any major repairs - but that does include replacing the original exhaust last summer. My 98-02 Accords are averaging <$1000/yr on the same distances driven.
 

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With the numbers you are offering, the only concern I would have is that the timing belt/water pump service is done at or around 100k miles (160k,km). Otherwise, unless abused, the RL should have a service experience similar to the Accords.

I drove my first RL 200,000 miles (320km) with minimal service. One strut, one motor mount. Had to have a steering rack but that was under warranty. Traded it with the 4th set of tires and third set of brakes. I should also say that I am a routine service fanatic and changed the oil every 3500 miles or so. When it was traded, it needed one front axle.

I wish I had kept my original RL to give to my son when he graduated from college.
 

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The most important thing that you'll need to know about using the Ridgeline for truck tasks is that its specifications for load are conservative, unlike most other trucks on the market. You'll need a special sliding mount if your horse trailer uses a 5th wheel. Basically, the Ridgeline is as advertised, and is also far better as a daily driver, handling wise, than a truck with solid rear axle and leaf springs. The extra storage (trunk and under rear seat) are spaces that I use almost daily. The drive system makes it far better on-road in winter than conventional part-time 4WD systems as well.

So, the Ridgeline is the best daily driver, Home Depot runner, and compact tow vehicle by a wide margin.

That said, it's all conditional on you wanting one vehicle to do these jobs. It sounds like you have the flexibility to have a multi-vehicle household and some room is being freed up. Your needs might be better served with a more efficient daily driver, plus a full-size beater truck.

That beater truck could even be your current one. If you stop using it routinely, its current marginal condition won't decay very fast. If it's past the point of being trustworthy, replacement older trucks are cheap, though I wouldn't say that Detroit-label trucks made in the 2000's could be considered reliable even when new. A Tundra would be best for this solution.
 

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Browse thru the posts from the inception of the Ridgeline Owners Club Forum from the beginning till now. You'll see the good the not so good and the bad. But you will see the consensus is pretty darn good. My first impression back in 07 was "what is it?" I've owned 51 vehicles since 1967 and....well, 2 Ridgelines later and I can say my previous 07 RTX and my current 09 RTL have been the best of all! Hard to believe that the first RL's were introduced in 06 and now we're anticipating the next generation of RL's. Time has flown by!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Here's my synopsis of the ROC from reading through hundreds of posts.

  • Except for a few notable exceptions, Ridgeline owners love their trucks.
  • The Ridgeline is not a 3/4 ton truck, and never was intended to be.
  • Gas mileage is lower than it should be
  • AWD system is poorly understood, and works so well as to be effective but unnoticable.
  • Some issues with torque converter lockup and vibration
  • Many issues with heads on earlier models
  • Rads need to be updated.
  • Misc other minor issues and gremlins that vary from truck to truck. Canadian units seem to have better fit and finish than US built units.
  • Do your regular maintenance, keep fluids fresh, and replace the TB when called for.
  • Truck will haul and pull as advertised but not like a 3/4 or 1 ton diesel (nor should it)
  • Rear tailgate is useful
  • Rear trunk is exceptional
  • Turning radius is surprisingly large.
  • Most owners believe the Ridgeline is misunderstood or the best kept secret in the truck world.
  • 10 years is a long time to go without an update
  • Everyone is holding out high hopes the 2016/2017 replacement is as good or better.

I am expecting I'll end up with a Ridgeline next time I need to add a vehicle to the stable. My wife is not convinced I'll be happy with the 60" box though. I specifically ordered the 8' box on my extended cab F150 for the ability to carry 8' materials with the tailgate closed.
 

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8 foot bed is nice when you actually use it. Realistically how often is there anything in the back of the truck?? I do renovation work with my Ridgeline. I haul 4x8 sheets in the back of my ridge all the time. It will easily and safely haul 20 sheets of drywall. I use ratchet straps to hold things down. You can run a strap over the hanging end if you are worried about things sliding out.

Basically I would rather have these things. . . .

Compact size to fit in city parking spots
Quad cab to hold tools and my 2 year old daughter's car seat
Trunk to hold my daily use tools . . .

Than having an 8 foot bed.
 
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