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The spreadsheet in the first post at the BITOG thread linked below provides that. You do NOT need to join that forum or dropbox, etc to directly download the spreadsheet:

Transmission Partial Drain CALCULATOR **Sticky

For purposes of input to the spreadsheet for our G2 RLs:
enter 3.3 as the "Partial Drain & refill Amount"
enter 8.1 (AWD) or 7.8 (FWD) as the "Total Fluid"
The "Total Fluid" difference is due to the capacity of the cooler on all AWD but not FWD models; those quantities from the G2 Honda Service Manual.

Note that spreadsheet is valid for any miscible-fluid replacement scheme where a portion of "old" is replaced with a portion of "new" with thorough mixing between each refill (engine coolant, for example).
And these are only applicable to the '17-'19 6spd, the 9spd is an entirely different animal, and basically unserviceable by the home mechanic, imo. Does the '20 have the 9spd, in both the FWD & AWD, sorry so unfamilar on the specifications of the G2. Also what is the Capacity of coolant and amount drained , should be in the Full Owners Manual toward the back, I'll grab my iPad at lunch and look it up if not easily available
 
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And these are only applicable to the '17-'19 6spd, the 9spd is an entirely different animal .....
Thank You for that very appropriate correction / clarification (y)

Edited my post accordingly ;)

Also what is the Capacity of coolant and amount drained , should be in the Full Owners Manual toward the back
Mine shows 1.88 gallons as the change ("Partial Refill") quantity including the reservoir; no mention of the total system quantity including the passages in the block in the Owner's Manual, probably need to check the Service Manual to find that (I don't have that section in my collection).
 
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Regarding the coolant, in the old days (2008) it said 10 years or x# of miles. It's supposed to be changed with the timing belt service so most likely that's the time to change. Also, some engines can be a PITA to bleed the air out of the cooling system. In the old days before EDPM hoses I used to change them every 3 years or so, so It's nice to not have to do that anymore.
 

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Regarding the coolant, in the old days (2008) it said 10 years or x# of miles. It's supposed to be changed with the timing belt service so most likely that's the time to change. Also, some engines can be a PITA to bleed the air out of the cooling system. In the old days before EDPM hoses I used to change them every 3 years or so, so It's nice to not have to do that anymore.
Growing up around my grandfather's auto repair shop, the bays were always full of cars and trucks needing:

Belts (several of them), hoses (radiator and vacuum), shocks, plugs, wires, rotors, caps, points, condensers, PCV valves, air filters, brake pads/shoes/rotors, fan clutches, A/C recharges, carburetor rebuilds, starter/alternator brushes, mufflers (rust), and more every few tens of thousands of miles as normal, routine service. It's truly astonishing how relatively maintenance-free modern automobiles are - just replace the fluids when the manuals recommends and hope there are no fundamental design flaws that no amount of maintenance can avoid. :)
 

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I have fond memories of the ice build up in the distributor on the 64' Landrover. Ah... the old days (glad they are gone!)

Steve
 

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Steve,
I have a few LRs and my ‘66 has a Deucilier dizzy, it has a 2 piece point set! How fun is that?
RL daily Driver, LR if I want to Fix somethin!
cheers,
Tru...ar
 
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I miss checking the dwell on my duel point 69 Dodge Charger RT. The good old days!
PS I still have the dwell meter.
 

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Im at 55k miles on my 2017. I havent done it in the past with other vehicles, but are either a coolant flush or transmission flush neccesary. Ive read mixed reviews both ways, figured i would bring it straight to the ROC. Any feedback appreciated.
HI, I just bought a 2017 with 59,000 miles on it and did a road trip to Oklahoma. After getting into 108 degree temps I started noticing the surging that has been talked about here. I took it to the Honda dealer and they did the reprogramming of the trans and 3 times fluid/flush changes under warranty. The issue was fixed and the drive back was uneventful. Feels great and shifts beautiful. I would suggest taking yours in and having it reprogrammed and the fluid/flushed changed. Honda gives it a 8 year-80,000 miles warranty on this issue. I also for the way back added a S-vcm harness and got 25.2 miles to the gallon on the return trip.
 

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Im at 55k miles on my 2017. I havent done it in the past with other vehicles, but are either a coolant flush or transmission flush neccesary. Ive read mixed reviews both ways, figured i would bring it straight to the ROC. Any feedback appreciated.
Always follow the recommended schedule of service while vehicle is still under warranty unless you want to fight a battle on warranty work. I not only do it when it's due and recommended, but I pay a little more to have the dealership do it "While it is under warranty", therefore if there are any warranty issues, there is no fight. My son is a mechanic at a Nissan dealership, and he has seen the dealer fight with people who could not prove that maintenance was done timely and properly. Once it is out of warranty, do what you want. I know that I will be doing my own oil changes at that point.
 

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Im at 55k miles on my 2017. I havent done it in the past with other vehicles, but are either a coolant flush or transmission flush neccesary. Ive read mixed reviews both ways, figured i would bring it straight to the ROC. Any feedback appreciated.
In years past, I had my Chevy Silverado Transmission power flushed every 50k. On the second flush, the transmission started to slip. I have a 2014 Ridgeline SE with 115k miles on it and it's never been flushed. An old Mechanic told me, if it ain't broke, leave it alone. Just use NOTHING but Full Synthetic Oil, keep the air filter clean or invest in a K&N permanent air filter. By the way, my SE still has the original spark plugs too and I get 22mpg on the road :)
 

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115K miles and no tranny drain and fill either? Would that old mechanic want you to use full synthetic tranny fluid as well?
 

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Use NOTHING but Honda fluids especially Tranny, Coolant, Dif oil, transfer case fluid and Power Steering fluid. Oil well you can use what you want.

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"Use NOTHING but Honda fluids especially.........". Wonder what that would be based upon? Does Honda actually make any fluids?
 

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........similar to, if not exactly the same, as most other auto manufacturers do, no? Would there even be an automotive fluid aftermarket if the aftermarket fluids were not as good as or better than OE? Would a full synthetic tranny fluid, that met/exceeded OE specs, handle heat better than semi-synthetic OE tranny fluid?
 

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........similar to, if not exactly the same, as most other auto manufacturers do, no?
Correct.

Would there even be an automotive fluid aftermarket if the aftermarket fluids were not as good as or better than OE?
Sure. People buy inferior or inappropriate products all day long due to various reasons including cost, convenience, ignorance, belief, etc.

Would a full synthetic tranny fluid, that met/exceeded OE specs, handle heat better than semi-synthetic OE tranny fluid?
Perhaps the fluid might not break down as quickly, but the shift quality might suffer or clutches may wear more quickly.

It's a lot easier for an automaker to formulate a transmission fluid for a specific transmission than for a transmission fluid maker to formulate a fluid that works with different transmissions from different manufacturers.

Honda, for example, has four different A/T fluids - each one for a different transmission: DW-1 for the 6-speed (and 5AT), Type 3.1 for the 9-speed, Type 2.0 for the 10-speed, and CVT fluid.

Valvoline, for example, recommends their MaxLife ATF for dozens of different transmissions from many different automakers - it can't possibly be an ideal fluid for any single transmission.

(Moderator note: added 5AT to the DW-1 list).
 

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Sure. People buy inferior or inappropriate products all day long due to various reasons including cost, convenience, ignorance, belief, etc.
I'll opine that those factors, plus the power of advertising / marketing, have much more to do with the billion$ of revenue generated by the automotive fluids aftermarket than any demonstrable "as good as or better than OE" factor.
 
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I did make reference to "as good as or better than OE". My point being.....safe to use because it's as good as or better than OE.

"Ideal fluid", that could be subjective.....full synthetics could be better than semi-DW-1?, hum.....but I guess that could be subjective as well. If the fluid lists on the label that it's suitable for use in the vehicle I'm driving/maintaining, I'm comfortable with that. Problems with shifting and clutches?........the law firm of 1-800-Dewey-Cheatum-Howe will take care of that.

I'm simply questioning the statement "use NOTHING but Honda fluids" and asking what support there is for that statement. Let's try not to go to Honda Genuine air in the tires. Just kidding.;)

Raise those hoods once a week and have a look around.👌
 

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I'm simply questioning the statement "use NOTHING but Honda fluids" and asking what support there is for that statement

I spent thirty years in a Honda parts dept. Example for support.

I was talking to a Honda tech one day about antifreeze. I asked him about one of the name brand coolants. He said it was good for any car make. But he also said when doing services on cars/Hondas he started noticing that the cars with Honda coolant in the radiator, the coolant and the radiator seems cleaner.

And when getting cars in for service because the car wasn't shifting correctly, we would ask if the fluid had been changed. The customer would say they just changed it or the had it changed at another shop. Next question we would ask 'was Honda tranny fluid used'? Most of the time the answer was 'i don't know, but I was told that it would work in my car' or no I got it at the parts store and I was told it was ok to use in my car.
I did not work on these cars but handed out the parts/fluids fir these cars. So saw alot.

We also started selling our fluids to some of the shops that worked on Hondas. I asked why they are buying it. The answer ' tired of the complaints and the car coming back and I have to pay my guys to flush the other stuff out'.

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A (as in one, I presume) Honda Tech says “seems cleaner” is not much support and is subjective at best. Is there any component of a vehicle more neglected by owners than the tranny? Well, maybe the cooling system. There’s nothing “magic“ about Honda, Motorcraft, ACDelco, Mopar, etc., etc., etc. fluids. None of them make/refine their own fluids.
 
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