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Discussion Starter #1
If you allow me I will share three videos of two of our race cars, both of them have CV´s and are rear wheels drive, I´m sharing them because all the concerns I haver read about the lift kit and CV´s issues. These cars obviously take a lot of punishment, the first video is a Class 1600 has a VW engine and limited suspension travel, never had a problem with the CV´s or axles, the other two videos are from our Class 1, V8 engine and lots of suspension travel, again never had broken an axle and the only CV´s problems we had it was because we did not have the spare ones and had to use the ones he had for a complete race season. So my point being is that it all depends on driving habits, these cars can take lots of punishment but there still have some limits and if we are hitting stuff left and right then we will brake something. Drive with common sense, the CV´s will have to be replace on the Ridgeline eventually but not because of the lift kit.


 

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2006 Ridgeline RTS in Steel Blue
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Completely Agree, Since this is an "issue" as both the G1 & G2 have CV's, I've moved this thread.

Moderator Note: Thread Moved to Correct Part of Forum
 

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The concerns are not stemmed from the quality of the axles, or let alone the torque they can handle. The concern is at the angles in which they operate.
The custom designs of these vehicles in the videos take into consideration of the angles of articulation of axles that will go into them. However, when you 'stretch' the limits of the operating angles of these axles, regardless of their articulation, their service life will diminish severely. I had a Gen 3 Accord and it was lowered 2"s and I used to have some trouble with the axles living past 50K miles. I finally found out the 'fix', but it was just that the static and operating angle was too sharp.

I agree with you that the Gen 1, at least for the sake of this conversation, is a very well engineered and robust vehicle. At 230K miles, I finally changed out the suspension and the compliant ride (aside from the aftermarket struts/springs) is very welcoming.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited by Moderator)
Interesting, I replaced one CV on my lifted "06" with 120,000 miles only because I tore a boot off road. Lift was installed at 1500 miles.
Exactly that is one of the main reasons CV's have problems, if the boots are torn the grease will be spilled out, loose lubrication and dirt will come in causing wear, but this can happen with or without the lift kit.

The concerns are not stemmed from the quality of the axles, or let alone the torque they can handle. The concern is at the angles in which they operate.
The custom designs of these vehicles in the videos take into consideration of the angles of articulation of axles that will go into them. However, when you 'stretch' the limits of the operating angles of these axles, regardless of their articulation, their service life will diminish severely. I had a Gen 3 Accord and it was lowered 2"s and I used to have some trouble with the axles living past 50K miles. I finally found out the 'fix', but it was just that the static and operating angle was too sharp.

I agree with you that the Gen 1, at least for the sake of this conversation, is a very well engineered and robust vehicle. At 230K miles, I finally changed out the suspension and the compliant ride (aside from the aftermarket struts/springs) is very welcoming.
In our race cars we have to limit the suspension travel also, the reason being to not hurt the CV's and not damage the shocks, the RL has also limiters, in the back suspension you can see the limiter and it will not let the suspension go past that limit, also the struts play a big part on limiting the suspension because they only have much travel and will not go past its limit, the lift kit on the RL is not stressing the CV''s to extreme angles, they will wear out, not because of the lift kit but because of use. Not trying to educate anyone, just talking from experience, and hopefully the info can help someone that is considering a lift kit.
 

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When I purchased mine at the beginning of the year with 75k, I felt the vibration we associate with a failing axle on acceleration. When I just had the lift kit put on my tech confirmed the driver front was beginning to weep grease on the inside boot. With the lift installed, the vibration is definitely more noticeable with the different angle the original was not used too! So angle does play a role, especially with parts already on the way out. This is not a boot issue but the CV joint itself. Just my experience
 
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