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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I bought the Hamsar 45030 kit from PUMA (1-800-354-3552) for about $45.
http://www.hamsar.com/drlkits.htm

(PS. I recently learned the 45035 kit will also work, the difference is the 45035 runs the hi-beams at 60% reduction while the 45030 runs the low-beams at 24% reduction. PSS. I swapped out my old module with the hi-beam 45035 one. I simply just plugged in the new module and only had to switch/reverse the hi/low beam wire connections, everthing else was left as before.)

Below I'll detail for the 45030 kit where each wire hooks up and also 6 pics (for the 45035 just reverse the low/hi beam connections). They work as advertised but note if you have fog lights they will also power up that circuit so you'll have to turn off the foglights during the day if you don't want them on. Apparently the foglights tap into the power from the low-beam headlight circuit so there's no easy way to get around this. Of course if you use the 45035 kit this is not an issue since the fogs lights are automatically turned off by having the hi-beams on.



DRL wires -> Honda wires
Black - ground to fender wall
Red - driver side fuse box power, white/bolt
White - low beam red/yellow
Orange - high beam white/yellow
Green - yellow in under dash driver side fuse/relay box
Blue - black/white in under dash driver side fuse/relay box
Yellow - green/orange parking brake wire

I used the included tap splices for all except the two under the dash wires, Green & Blue as the honda wires were too thick. I cut away the insulation on them and hard wired them in with solder.

The ground was a short wire and I found a close by hole in the fender wall, I used a dremel to grind off the paint and attached with a nut/bolt and then repainted any bare metal surface still showing.
 

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Excellent instructions and photos. I did have one difference in my install. The low beam wires were not Red Green but they were Red Yellow. I tapped my DRL module using the driver's side headlamp connector.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
bongus said:
Excellent instructions and photos. I did have one difference in my install. The low beam wires were not Red Green but they were Red Yellow. I tapped my DRL module using the driver's side headlamp connector.

Opps, my mistake, I quoted the color from the passenger side which apparently is a different color wire. I've corrected my table above with the correct wire color. Thanks for pointing that out.
 

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Thanks for the excellent instructions and photos. I found the under dashboard work to be a bit cramped but doable.

I picked up some larger tap splices at Pep Boys to connect the blue and green wires to the relay box wires.
 

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Very nicely done! Thank you. This is a project that is high on my to do list. Your post will make the installation much easier. The only note or comment that I have based on the pictures is that there should be a fuse as close as possible, preferably within 6", of the "Red wire mounts to bolt on drivers side fusebox".

For those that may be reading that are electrically challenged, a fuse placed at the far end of the (red) power wire does not protect the wire itself, only the devices beyond the fuse. The reason is that the bolt appears to be the main power bus input to the fuseblock. If it is, and if the red wire shorts to ground for any reason such as vibration / abrasion, accident, pinch as a result of engine bay service, etc., the red wire will burn until in melts apart. In the process of burning, it will light up just like the element in a toaster and can burn through other wires causing massive damage. A fuse placed at the source, in this case at the bolt in the fuse block, a short anywhere beyond the fuse will blow the fuse. If there is a fuse link for the entire fuse block it may not blow in time to prevent a fire. An inline fuse holder can be purchased at any auto parts store, Wal Mart or similar, or any electronics store for about $2.00. The size of the fuse should be the same size as the fuse that protects the accessory that is being installed.

I have seen the results of accessories installed without a fuse at the source many times. Years ago I was in the back seat of a car that had a CB set (ya, it was a long time ago!) connected directly to the under dash fuse block. When we parked and started to get out the power wire got pinched in the seat hinge and instantly lit up the entire length of the power wire. It was glowing red hot and instantly filled the entire car with thick smoke. It burned the drivers hands and leg severely and burned a long stripe deeply into the seat and carpet. Fortunately, other than the drivers hands and leg, we all got out with minor injuries and smoke inhalation. If he had installed a 50 cent fuse at the fuse block the only damage would have been the 50 cent fuse. If we were still on the highway when the short happened - who knows...
 

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Good observation UH...the manufacturer has the fuse preinstalled when you buy the unit. I'm guessing the distance between the main module and fuse has been predetermined by the manufacturer. But, I'll take Vertrkr's stance and shorten the distance.
 

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If the wire has a higher ampere rating than the fuse, then the wire will not burn no matter where the fuse is located. Fuses do protect devices somewhat, but there primary function is to protect wires from burning. If a wire burns in a protected circiut it is because of an oversize fuse, undersized cable.

In house wiring you should never use a 14 gauge wire in a 20 amp breaker (14 gauge wire and its max breaker size is 15 amp) so I always buy bigger wires and not worry about it. If the 15 amp breaker fails to open, the larger size wire will buy you some more amperes and hopefully the breaker will eventually open.... ok I'm rambling, somebody slap me... in short same apply with cars.
 

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Maybe there is just a misunderstanding somewhere. The point of placing the fuse as close as possible to the power source is to protect everything downstream, including the wire itself, from current flow in excess of the rating of the fuse. The physical location of the fuse in the circuit is critical. True, the size of the wire between a properly sized fuse or circuit breaker and the load is very important, but the physical location of the fuse is critical for similar but far different reasons. Perhaps that is where the confusion lies with this topic. Use the example of an accessory such as a small audio amplifier installed in the trunk of your car. If you were to power the device from the battery located in the engine compartment, feed it with a much oversized wire (generally a good thing to do) such as a 4 gauge wire to supply a 5 Amp device only 15 feet away, and install the fuse in the trunk just 6 inches from the amplifier, the wire between the battery and the fuse is not protected at all. If you shorted the wire to ground by running a screw through the door sill then through the wire then to the body, 100% of the current flow that the battery could produce would flow from the battery to the point of the short (the screw). Zero current would flow from the screw to the fuse. In that case the fuse would actually be connected to ground via the screw, not the battery. The wire, even a 4 gauge wire, between the screw and the battery would be so severely overloaded that it would start to heat very rapidly until it failed (burned or melted apart) or the battery itself failed (or exploded due to the direct short). Visions of the inside of a toaster come to mind.

If, in the example above, you chose to connect the amplifiers ground wire back to the negative battery terminal via another 4 gauge wire and connected the chassis of the amplifier to the vehicle body, the results would be the same. The additional problem that connecting the amplifiers ground wire to the negative battery terminal would cause is that if the vehicles main ground cable from the battery to the chassis deteriorated, corroded or simply failed, your amplifiers ground wire would have to handle the entire vehicles electrical systems current demands to and from the battery. The 40 to 60 Amp current draw that the starter motor draws when you start the engine would be more than your new ground wire could handle. Ok, a 4 gauge wire might handle it for a short period of time but a 12 or 18 gauge wire would not.



In your example of house wiring, circuit breakers or fuses are connected at the source. They are inside the electrical panel just a few inches from the main entrance cable, physically protected inside of a sturdy metal box. The entire electrical panel is 'protected' by the main breaker, usually a 200 Amp breaker, 100 Amps per phase for most modern residences. If there were no individual circuit breakers in the electrical panel and they were all at the receptacle end of the circuit, the wire in the wall would not be protected beyond the protection that the main 200 Amp breaker would provide. Only wires and devices that are downstream of the breaker itself are protected by that breaker. In this example with breakers at the receptacle end, if you ran a nail into a 12 gauge wire inside the wall before the breaker and shorted the black power wire to any or all of: the white common wire, the bare ground wire, or an earth ground connection such as you (via the nail and the hammer) or a water pipe, what would happen to the wire? I suggest that the wire would get very hot very quickly and one of two things would happen. Either the wire would melt apart, hopefully before a fire started, or, the main 200 Amp breaker would trip. In either case, the 15 or 20 Amp breaker that was at the receptacle end of the wire would have no current flow through it so it would have no reason to trip. The entire current flow would have been from the source inside the electrical panel, through that nail and either back via the white or bare wires or directly to ground, all of which are ahead of the breaker in this example. That is why the breakers are installed where they are, at the source.



It is very important to locate the fuse or circuit breaker as close as possible to the power source in order to limit the exposure of any unprotected power feed to the fuse or circuit breaker. Failing to do so can have catastrophic results.



In vehicles, never make power connections directly to the battery unless there is a fuse at the battery. An auxiliary power terminal on the fuse block is a better and a safer choice. Never make a ground or negative connection directly to the negative battery terminal, make them to the body, frame or other designated common ground point. In many of today’s vehicles that have "multiplex" wiring for factory installed lights and accessories, choosing the wrong power or ground wire to connect to can have unpredictable results. Auxiliary battery and / or large power capacitor installations for high power accessories such as high power car stereo installations require a great deal of care and knowledge if they are to be done safely and correctly.



Just my opinion, I could be wrong, but I don't think so.

Here endeth the rant...
 

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I see your point now, a short after the fuse, the circuit is protected. A short before the fuse, the wire before the short is not protected. Thanks, hence the difference between knowledge and wisdom.
 

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Thanks Vertrkr for the great review on DRL install. I have a few questions.
Will this install in any way effect the OEM warranty?
How did you decide on the Hamsar kit over any others?
About how long did it take you to complete the installation?
I can't find any internet listing for where you purchased your kit (PUMA) do they have a site?

I have learned a great deal from all the sharing of knowledge from ROC members.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
PJr said:
Thanks Vertrkr for the great review on DRL install. I have a few questions.
Will this install in any way effect the OEM warranty?
How did you decide on the Hamsar kit over any others?
About how long did it take you to complete the installation?
I can't find any internet listing for where you purchased your kit (PUMA) do they have a site?
I have learned a great deal from all the sharing of knowledge from ROC members.
1. Most likely yes but only for the lighting system. Any mod you do will not void the entire warranty just the effected parts you changed. This is pretty minor mod and done correctly I can't imagine anything going wrong except wearing out your bulbs a little earlier.

2. Hamsar kit was the only one I was aware of at the time, I'm sure there are others but it seemed the only one I found others installing.

3. About an hour of actual install time. Many hours of studying the wiring diagrams in the service manual and the truck to make sure I did everything right.

4. I don't think Puma has a site, not sure, but there number for info and orders is 1-800-354-3552. Hamsar has a site though at: http://www.hamsar.com/drl.htm
 

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Question? and this has been bothering me? Why install a kit? Whynot just deactivate the dinger that dings when you exit the Ridge with the lights on, they go out in 20secs anyway and come on when you return. I would like to know how to deactivate that peskey dinger... :eek: :mad: :(
 

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My Ridgeline RT trim level came standard with day time running lights.

After I start it up I just turn the light knob two positions to the right :D :p :D :p
 

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vertrkr,

Man, you are the ultimate tinkerer! Very well posted instructions! I think your RL has been taken apart and put back together more than any five of us.
Thanks
 
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