Honda Ridgeline Owners Club Forums banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've been working on a ridgeline engine for awhile now, and I'm not a fan of the v-6 design . From a mechanics view there's not enough room to work on it comfortably, and too many moving parts. I'm no engineer, but why not use an inline four or maybe five or even six?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,635 Posts
You're entering troll territory.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Gotcha what kind of vehicle do you own?
I had a 96 Sierra half ton since New 220k miles all original drive train frame finally rusted out this year.(Massachusetts winters) I'm looking for another. In the meantime I have a 01 Forrester. In the nicer weather I have a 73 nova
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
You should post up some pictures of the nova. Oh and do you want to talk about a pain those Subaru spark plugs are high on my list lol. Great cars though I had a Forrester XT and loved it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
You should post up some pictures of the nova. Oh and do you want to talk about a pain those Subaru spark plugs are high on my list lol. Great cars though I had a Forrester XT and loved it.
The nova needs a paint job,it's been pretty low budget, but it's mechanically bulletproof. If you want to see it go to lebanon valley dragway website videos. It's done a 12.2 and I drive it there and back most weekends.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,350 Posts
Back to the original question. It is a Honda. And Honda uses V6 engines in its larger vehicles, at least up til now. There are rumors of turbo 4's and the like in the future. The V6 is the logical choice, as it is with virtually every major manufacturer making similar sized vehicles and needing naturally aspirated engines with a little bit of torque to get those big machines moving.

It would be tougher to fit an inline 6 and maintain Honda's general design with the front wheel drive/tranny package. They use a similar design across virtually all their models regardless of engine size.

Honda's favorite "innovation" scheme seems to be to eek out more power and better economy from the same engine package. So far this has given us things like VTEC, 6 speed (and higher trannys), and VCM which add complexity. So it is correct to say that the drive packages are becoming more complex. Same is true for nearly all other manufacturers.

For those of us that still like the good old fashioned inline 6 that can be rebuilt while still connected inside the frame, I think we are just out of luck. Dinosaurs of the auto age. I feel your pain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
302 Posts
To add to the thread, a V-6 is also the least efficient design of all engines as far as making power goes. Look at the crankshaft and how the journals have to be placed on it compared to all the other crankshafts... you'll see how odd they look and why they have to be spaced differently just to try to make up for the stepchild design. It's much easier to have four or eight pistons turn a crankshaft 360 degrees than for 6.

As somebody has mentioned already, Honda sticks with something that works, I realize it's complex in comparison to most but this engine is in like 8 different models in various forms. I think an inline 6 sitting 90 or 180) just wouldn't fit... there would need to be too many changes to already proven systems (transmission etc) for it to be economical for Honda... I just don't see them going bigger.

Lets see what an Ecoboost (esq) inline 4 can do, I'm all for saving more gas and getting the same HP.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Not that I've done much on my ridgeline yet but there's loads of room to work compared to my audi. Guess it's all subjective.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,339 Posts
Not that I've done much on my ridgeline yet but there's loads of room to work compared to my audi. Guess it's all subjective.
IMHO, the Ridgeline engine bay is the most spacious of any car I have ever owned--Tundra, Highlander, CRV, Accord, Santa Fe, CX-5, Camry, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,194 Posts
I see where it could get dicey though. If he's got all chev trucks the engines are mounted longitudinal so most things are easier to get to. The Ridgeline is mounted transverse so the belts are slammed up against the wheel well and one head is way at the back. But still, this is just a Honda, it's pretty easy to work on. There's still lots of room considering, lots of worse cars out there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,620 Posts
I see where it could get dicey though. If he's got all chev trucks the engines are mounted longitudinal so most things are easier to get to. The Ridgeline is mounted transverse so the belts are slammed up against the wheel well and one head is way at the back. But still, this is just a Honda, it's pretty easy to work on. There's still lots of room considering, lots of worse cars out there.
You go work on some of the vans or mid-engine beasts from the past and the RL will start looking pretty access-friendly all of a sudden. It's all relative.
You want great access, pick yourself up an old 60s sedan with a straight or slant 6. You could practically climb in there with the engine to work on 'em. EVERYTHING was easy to get to. But that was then, and this is now. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
302 Posts
You go work on some of the vans or mid-engine beasts from the past and the RL will start looking pretty access-friendly all of a sudden. It's all relative.
You want great access, pick yourself up an old 60s sedan with a straight or slant 6. You could practically climb in there with the engine to work on 'em. EVERYTHING was easy to get to. But that was then, and this is now. :)
Are you saying we are lucky we don't have to pull a panel in the passenger compartment to change the rear plugs? :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
28 Posts
My Bertone X1/9 had an access panel that you had to remove to get to the distributor.

An access panel that was behind the spare tire.

Which was behind the passenger seat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,194 Posts
You go work on some of the vans or mid-engine beasts from the past and the RL will start looking pretty access-friendly all of a sudden. It's all relative.
You want great access, pick yourself up an old 60s sedan with a straight or slant 6. You could practically climb in there with the engine to work on 'em. EVERYTHING was easy to get to. But that was then, and this is now. :)
Oh I totally agree. Like I said further back... Go get an Audi, and some Northstar V8 applications GM recommended you remove the engine to change the spark plugs!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Oh I totally agree. Like I said further back... Go get an Audi, and some Northstar V8 applications GM recommended you remove the engine to change the spark plugs!
That's a good example, I have to wonder what those designers were thinking on those. How about having a clutch slave cylinder in the bell housing like a Volvo , so you have to remove the trans to get at it?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
16,088 Posts
Oh I totally agree. Like I said further back... Go get an Audi, and some Northstar V8 applications GM recommended you remove the engine to change the spark plugs!
Speaking of the Northstar V8, the starter lives in the valley under the intake manifold. An experienced mechanic can replace it in about an hour and a half. The rest of us might accomplish it in half a day.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top