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Did you get an extended warranty on your truck

  • Yes I did

    Votes: 52 47.3%
  • No I did not

    Votes: 36 32.7%
  • I did not , did not think I needed it

    Votes: 22 20.0%

  • Total voters
    110
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Just to clarify...
If Person A buys an 8yr/120K mile warranty when the vehicle is brand new.
Person B could buy a ~5yr/100K mile warranty for $100-$150 more, right before they turn over 36K miles.

Is that correct?
I think you've got it.

Let's say I bought a 2017 Ridgeline 2 years and 11 months ago and it has 35,000 miles on it today. I could have bought the 8/120 "new" plan at the time of purchase for about $1,300 or I could buy the 5/120 "near new" plan today for about $1,400. Either way, I still end up with about 8 years of coverage from the day I bought it or until the odometer hits 120K. By waiting, I would pay a little more for the same coverage and would have lost some of the "side benefits" during those 2 years 11 months such as a rental reimbursement or meals/lodging if I broke down while away from home.

If you're not worried about the side benefits, it might be wise to wait until the last minute to consider Honda Care. If a vehicle proves reliable over the first three years, you might consider skipping Honda Care. If a vehicle hints at future reliability issues (fuel injectors, transmissions, etc.), you might consider opting for Honda Care at the last minute. If you wait, there's always a risk that Honda Care could increase in price significantly, but it hasn't done this historically.
 

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2019 RTL-E (white on beige) in central Texas
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@TommyDeVito, take note of ^that^ as relates to your interest for 8yrs (from in-service date) of coverage for less than 100k odo miles....

Back when I was shopping I filled out a 'dummy' vehicle on the Saccucci info page for a 34-months in-service 2017 RL with 34000 miles even though mine was a 2-months in-service '19 with ~2k miles. That yielded an email from Saccucci with all of the then-current "Near New Vehicle" plans and costs (plans Fxx and Gxx).

Note that Fxx and Gxx plan Time starts not on the in-service date but on the plan purchase date. Miles are still total odo miles of course. Looking back at that "Near New Vehicle" info I got, I see, for example, Plan F/G58 covers 5 years from date of plan purchase or 80k miles (20k miles less than the "New Vehicle" option, with attendant lower cost due to lower miles and time).

Just saying there might be a strategy in the 'deferred purchase' / "Near New Vehicle" plans that comes closer to your wants. As mentioned by @zroger73, the exact plan costs (and maybe even terms) might change.

When I spoke with Saccucci about differences in coverage between "New" and "Near New" plans and implications of delayed purchase they said there was none, but I have not seen a "Near New" Contract in full myself to verify that.

Anyhoo, just for your consideration and perhaps further evaluation.
 

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So religiously go to the dealership for all service/repairs, where they will happily fleece you for thousands of dollars, by charging exorbitant rates and performing unnecessary services.

Then in exchange for being one of their "good" customers (i.e. huge profit makers), they may give you a few hundred dollar discount on an overpriced major repair!
So religiously go to the dealership for all service/repairs, where they will happily fleece you for thousands of dollars, by charging exorbitant rates and performing unnecessary services.

Then in exchange for being one of their "good" customers (i.e. huge profit makers), they may give you a few hundred dollar discount on an overpriced major repair!
You forgot to quote this part..."NOT SOMETHING TO RELY ON, but for those who are unaware...."

So, in October 2001 we purchased a new Odyssey. Using coupons from the selling dealership, we would bring it back for regular maintenance (oil/trans services, etc.) and we would always schedule maintenance with the same Service Advisor. Find a good advisor and make friends. In Jan 2003, we already had approx. 115k miles on van. The transmission was making a weird noise so we brought it in for diagnosis. No factory warranty remaining, no HondaCare. The call we got from the Service Advisor was to tell us that the transmission was failing, but that between Honda and the dealership, it would be replaced at no charge to us. Not only did they replace the transmission, but while they were at it, they fixed some issue with the EGR system (some issue that was supposedly common and Honda covered it as well), and they covered a rental while the vehicle was in the shop. We didn't ask, they just did it. A few years prior, when I was a service advisor (not for Honda), we would do the same thing for regular customers. It;'s not uncommon to take care of your regulars.

You bring up a good point about the higher costs for having maintenance performed at a dealership, but In this overpriced hell-hole that we call the Bay Area, REPUTABLE independent auto repair shops are not much cheaper than our local stealerships. Take advantage of coupons and price matching.

Also good info. for those reading this...it's the parts and service departments that keep a dealership afloat. Auto sales are VERY competitive and sometimes a dealer has to sell a "new" vehicle below their cost to make a sale (used cars are a different story). However, dealers will get kick-backs and other incentives from the manufacturer for moving units each month, and also from the financial institutions for brokering customer's loans through their banks. This is why your local dealership pushes up-sells such as Extended Service Contracts, Maintenance programs, scratch/dent coverage, paint/leather protection, etc., etc. There's good profit in those packages. But when car sales are slow, it's parts & service that keep the dealer going.
 

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2020 RTL-E Obsidian Blue Pearl
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First-time poster, interesting thread. Looking at trading a 2012 Acura TL AWD with 56K for a 2020 RTL-E soon, and the thought of an extended warranty has crossed my mind.

I have never been big on them, but this was in the old days when cars were less complex and cheaper to repair. Fortunately my car, save for a seized alternator bearing that left me dead in the road and failed nav head unit, both under warranty, has been pretty good. But it's a 2012, and relatively low-tech compared to current models, and the 3.7L V6 engine's been a problem child re oil consumption issues (Acura dumped the 3.7 a couple years ago for the same 3.5 that's in the RL).

However, a work colleague has an identical Acura, and around 80K he started to hear a squealing coming from underneath. Sure enough, two sets of driveshaft bearings were starting to give out: $2,200 for a new driveshaft assembly, P/L (most of that was for parts, the bearings are sealed). BUT being the pragmatic civil engineer he is, he had the AcuraCare Extended Warranty, so he only had to pay the $100 deductible.

Vehicles are becoming more complex, especially the electronics. If that failed nav head unit in my car gave out on me past warranty, I'd get hit with >$4K P/L to repair (Acuras are expensive to repair).

So I am not sure what I will do. I do buy my vehicles through a broker (after selling cars, I refuse to step foot in a dealership) and I know he can get me an EW at his cost. If I wish to go that route.

Some very good suggestions here, thanks! JB :)

(PS I DO know that if I bought a FCA product, the EW would be a no-brainer).
 

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If
First-time poster, interesting thread. Looking at trading a 2012 Acura TL AWD with 56K for a 2020 RTL-E soon, and the thought of an extended warranty has crossed my mind.

I have never been big on them, but this was in the old days when cars were less complex and cheaper to repair. Fortunately my car, save for a seized alternator bearing that left me dead in the road and failed nav head unit, both under warranty, has been pretty good. But it's a 2012, and relatively low-tech compared to current models, and the 3.7L V6 engine's been a problem child re oil consumption issues (Acura dumped the 3.7 a couple years ago for the same 3.5 that's in the RL).

However, a work colleague has an identical Acura, and around 80K he started to hear a squealing coming from underneath. Sure enough, two sets of driveshaft bearings were starting to give out: $2,200 for a new driveshaft assembly, P/L (most of that was for parts, the bearings are sealed). BUT being the pragmatic civil engineer he is, he had the AcuraCare Extended Warranty, so he only had to pay the $100 deductible.

Vehicles are becoming more complex, especially the electronics. If that failed nav head unit in my car gave out on me past warranty, I'd get hit with >$4K P/L to repair (Acuras are expensive to repair).

So I am not sure what I will do. I do buy my vehicles through a broker (after selling cars, I refuse to step foot in a dealership) and I know he can get me an EW at his cost. If I wish to go that route.

Some very good suggestions here, thanks! JB :)

(PS I DO know that if I bought a FCA product, the EW would be a no-brainer).
If he had instead invested the money he spent on the warranty he would likely have been able to pay for the repair from the earnings and still have about what he put into the warranty, and maybe more. It's a gamble, just like at the casinos (or mayb the reverse). You will most likely come out ahead by not buying warranties but that doesn't mean they can't ever pay off. Looking at one car in one situation can be deceptive. If someone buys a warranty for every car they own in their lifetime they will most likely come out way behind, even if the warranty pays for itself on one or two vehicles. But remember, the warranty does not pay for itself unless repairs would have amounted to much more than the cost of the warranty because of the lost opportunity cost from not being able to invest the money or spend it on something else. But if someone wouldn't be able to pay for a large repair bill, then maybe they'd need the warranty, but the cost of the warranty itself probably equals one or two large repairs.

And yes, cars are more complex and repairs can be more expensive, but they are also much more reliable than they were in the old days so they are not as likely to need major repairs. Maybe it makes more sense to buy a Kia or Hyundai with the long manufacturer's warranty if that is important.
 

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If you do buy one be sure to check out the dealers on-line that sell them at a discount. About $1300 online and it will take you to 8 years or 96,000. Not bad for peace of mind, but even at that price I would have been out about 2300 bucks on the two previous Hondas I have owned. One wheel bearing is all I have needed between 36,000-90,000.
 

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I have not bought my Ridgeline yet, Ill get a certified preowned with original warranty still left on it. I, just thought I will get an extended warranty and wondering how many of you did or did not?
I've always turned down extended warranty offers and kept track of what I didn't spend minus what I would have spent on repairs the extended warranties would have covered. Long story short, I have never paid for a repair that an extended warranty would have covered. I am literally thousands of dollars ahead. Just saying. :)
 

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I used to be required to sell extended warranties on 10% of the consumer electronics items I sold on commission else face disciplinary action. At another job, I was required to offer and educate consumers on the merits of buying extended warranties. I never purchased extended warranties myself - partly because I understood how the system worked and partly because I avoided buying products with reliability issues for myself. I had first-hand knowledge of how infrequently warranties were used and how various brands and models of products held up over time. Thankfully, I'm now a salaried professional at a privately-owned business downstream of the sales department.

I've only kept two of my 30 vehicles past the 3/36 warranty period, but if I ever do that again, I will not hesitate to purchase the longest manufacturer service contract possible. As previously stated, vehicles are much more reliable now then they used to be, but when they do fail they are much more complicated or expensive to repair and many of those repairs cannot be performed by owners.
 

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Ive only purchase 1 extended warranty in the past. It was on a 1990 honda civic. In the end it was a wash...CV joint failure was covered by ext warranty...so it more than paid for itself.

I now have a 19 RL. I just bought the 8yr/120k mile warranty on it. Partly because of the reliability issues, mostly because i keep a vehicle a very long time...past the 3/36...so i want 8yr without having to deal with issues. And I used to not mind working on my own vehicles...still do, but dont enjoy it as much. With the high pressure fuel pumps, DI engines, electronic motor mounts, injector issues, etc in these newer vehicles I'm sure I will be having the dealership make all major repairs. When my wifes Mazda transmission acted up a few years ago I stopped by a friends shop..."cant work on that..dealer only". Turned out to be a software issue.
So this time I went with the Ext Warranty this time through New Honda and Used Car Dealer Serving Hyannis | Hyannis Honda
 

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I used to be required to sell extended warranties on 10% of the consumer electronics items I sold on commission else face disciplinary action. At another job, I was required to offer and educate consumers on the merits of buying extended warranties. I never purchased extended warranties myself - partly because I understood how the system worked and partly because I avoided buying products with reliability issues for myself. I had first-hand knowledge of how infrequently warranties were used and how various brands and models of products held up over time. Thankfully, I'm now a salaried professional at a privately-owned business downstream of the sales department.

I've only kept two of my 30 vehicles past the 3/36 warranty period, but if I ever do that again, I will not hesitate to purchase the longest manufacturer service contract possible. As previously stated, vehicles are much more reliable now then they used to be, but when they do fail they are much more complicated or expensive to repair and many of those repairs cannot be performed by owners.
You should always go towards what you feel is the right direction. We need to sleep at night. But (at least for now) I'm betting on Honda reliability over Honda care.
 

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You should always go towards what you feel is the right direction. We need to sleep at night. But (at least for now) I'm betting on Honda reliability over Honda care.
I would love to make that bet, but actual evidence of declining quality convinces me otherwise. I used to prefer Honda for quality and resale value. The quality advantage had faded and the Grim Reaper is coming for resale value next if quality doesn't improve. Honda has fallen to extremely average these days - not bad, but not where they once were.
 

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You should always go towards what you feel is the right direction. We need to sleep at night. But (at least for now) I'm betting on Honda reliability over Honda care.
*I'm going with Honda quality, based on my own long-term experience, but will bail in a couple years if not feeling good about it. It was one of the reasons I was glad to get the RTL AWD at a big discount at the end of the 2019 model year - should minimize a potential financial hit.
 

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Doing a little service (oil/filter) on the 2006 CRV that I’m about to hand down to my youngest son. In perfect working order. I hope I can see this kind of dependability out of my Ridgeline.

398927
 

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Doing a little service (oil/filter) on the 2006 CRV that I’m about to hand down to my youngest son. In perfect working order. I hope I can see this kind of dependability out of my Ridgeline.

View attachment 398927
In 2005 we handed our 99 Accord to our son and in 2012 we gave him our 2005 Accord Hybrid. His son now drives the 99 Accord. Both cars still running fine.
 

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Doing a little service (oil/filter) on the 2006 CRV that I’m about to hand down to my youngest son. In perfect working order. I hope I can see this kind of dependability out of my Ridgeline.

View attachment 398927
I drove our 2002 (first year of G2 CRV) from new until 2011, and our son then drove it through grad school. We sold it in 2015 and gave him the proceeds toward the new Civic he bought for himself. I'd say that CRV, my 1974 Celica (bought in college, 1978) and the 2007 Ridgeline have been my best vehicle experiences so far.
 

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In 2005 we handed our 99 Accord to our son and in 2012 we gave him our 2005 Accord Hybrid. His son now drives the 99 Accord. Both cars still running fine.
Nice!!!
5k oil / 30k transmission service...
They last...
I just called about getting the timing belt replaced at 122k, but found out this 2.4L has a timing chain. Wonder why Honda has some belts.. some chains...? ?
Oh my previous Hondas had belts.
 

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I drove our 2002 (first year of G2 CRV) from new until 2011, and our son then drove it through grad school. We sold it in 2015 and gave him the proceeds toward the new Civic he bought for himself. I'd say that CRV, my 1974 Celica (bought in college, 1978) and the 2007 Ridgeline have been my best vehicle experiences so far.
You’re right. One of my neighbors is the Internet salesman at our Honda dealership. And when I mentioned having an 06, he said “oh that’s one of the good ones.”
 

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You need another choice on your survey that says “Not yet, but if I plan to keep the truck past the warranty period, I will get one before the warranty runs out”. This is where I’m at. If I decide to keep the truck longer than 3 years, I will be buying an extended warranty.
While I think extended warranties are a waste of money, if someone wants one it can be a good strategy to wait until shortly before the manufacturer's warranty expires. You will probably start getting offers for such warranties at better prices, and why put out the money three years before you need to anyway? And people should be aware that you can negotiate on the price of the extended warranty if you do want to buy one at the time of purchase. They will easily knock a few hundred dollars off, but sometime you might be able to get it at around 25-50% off.
 

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While I think extended warranties are a waste of money, if someone wants one it can be a good strategy to wait until shortly before the manufacturer's warranty expires. You will probably start getting offers for such warranties at better prices, and why put out the money three years before you need to anyway? And people should be aware that you can negotiate on the price of the extended warranty if you do want to buy one at the time of purchase. They will easily knock a few hundred dollars off, but sometime you might be able to get it at around 25-50% off.
There's no room to discount Honda Care purchased online - it's already being sold at or near dealer cost and the dealers rely on volume bonuses instead.

I've never known of Honda or dealers to push Honda care - particularly just before the factory warranty expires. They'd much rather sell a higher-profit third-party warranty at the time of sale.
 

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There's no room to discount Honda Care purchased online - it's already being sold at or near dealer cost and the dealers rely on volume bonuses instead.

I've never known of Honda or dealers to push Honda care - particularly just before the factory warranty expires. They'd much rather sell a higher-profit third-party warranty at the time of sale.
You kinda hit on the bottom line with regards to these extended warranties. "Profit" These programs are not about savings for the buyer but profit for the seller. They wouldn't exist if they weren't profitable. So really who wins the end? It's rarely the consumer.
 
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