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My original michelins lasted 130k. Replaced them with Lattitudes (a 65k tire according to Michelin) and got fewer than 35k. Replaced the Lattitudes with supposed OEM Michelins and got fewer than 40k (a 60k tire according to Michelin). In both cases, the tires wore evenly, maintained balance, and have no wear patterns--they just wore out.

Note: The Lattitudes came from Costco, the OEM replacements from a retail tire chain.

I can't help but believe someone at Michelin noted that a run of their tires were lasting way too long and changed compounds to prevent this. After all, tires that greatly exceed their lifespan impact Michelin's bottom line. Or, maybe the long-lasting tires are made-to-order for Honda, in which case the long-lasting tires can be purchased from the dealer.

This alludes to another point--if mileage can vary by over 100%, they've got major quality control issues.

I'd be content with tires that lasted the duration of the mileage warranty. I don't expect tires to double the mileage warranty (although it's great when they do). But to barely make it past the half-way point on two sets of tires is unacceptable, especially given the price.

If I could get confirmation that tires purchased from a Honda dealer would provide better service (or were verifiably different than those on the open market) I might take the risk, pay the premium, and give Michelin another shot. However, I'll probably change to Generals this time.
 

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My original michelins lasted 130k. Replaced them with Lattitudes (a 65k tire according to Michelin) and got fewer than 35k. Replaced the Lattitudes with supposed OEM Michelins and got fewer than 40k (a 60k tire according to Michelin). In both cases, the tires wore evenly, maintained balance, and have no wear patterns--they just wore out.
Not sure if this is helpful at all, but 35k on Latititudes and MXV4s was par for the course on my Ody of the same generation. I would notice that they would go down to 50% very fast and then nearly-stop wearing the rest of the way. Of course, this is where they went from quiet and comfortable to rougher and loud.

130k is unheard of for any tire, no idea how that happened. Any chance your 2006 was an original factory run ?
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Not sure if this is helpful at all, but 35k on Latititudes and MXV4s was par for the course on my Ody of the same generation. I would notice that they would go down to 50% very fast and then nearly-stop wearing the rest of the way. Of course, this is where they went from quiet and comfortable to rougher and loud.

130k is unheard of for any tire, no idea how that happened. Any chance your 2006 was an original factory run ?
That describes my experience with the Lattitudes. One summer and the tread was half depth (at the time I was driving 110+ miles/day round trip for work, which is why I went with a road tire).

Agree regarding 130k; it just doesn't happen. Had it not happened to me I wouldn't believe it.

More specifically it was 127k, and the tread depth was probably 1/32", but the wear was completely even on all four tires. Get this--I only rotated them once at around 70k because the fronts showed a bit more wear than the rear. By the time I replaced them, wear was even across all four.

I assume you mean original factory run of the tire from Michelin--I suspect it probably was, which is why I ask the question regarding manufacturers tinkering with compounds in an effort to target specific longevity. I know now that a tire can be manufactured to last a very long time. I proved it. I also understand why a manufacturer may not want a tire to last so long. If the compound wears for this distance, tire internals may go bad before it visibly wears out. But it also means a tire shouldn't wear out prematurely if it's within spec for the respective vehicle.

Prior to this experience I was a Michelin fan. After it, I was going to adopt a baby and name it 'Michelin'. But going through two sets of 65k-rated tires in the last 75k is enough for me to abandon the brand.

I have a very difficult time believing this was a 'fluke'. Given the liability involved in manufacturing tires the makers must have tight controls on compounds and associated characteristics. It only makes me dislike Michelin that much more for improperly advertising as 65k the two garbage sets I wore though.
 

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That describes my experience with the Lattitudes. One summer and the tread was half depth (at the time I was driving 110+ miles/day round trip for work, which is why I went with a road tire).

Agree regarding 130k; it just doesn't happen. Had it not happened to me I wouldn't believe it.

More specifically it was 127k, and the tread depth was probably 1/32", but the wear was completely even on all four tires. Get this--I only rotated them once at around 70k because the fronts showed a bit more wear than the rear. By the time I replaced them, wear was even across all four.

I assume you mean original factory run of the tire from Michelin--I suspect it probably was, which is why I ask the question regarding manufacturers tinkering with compounds in an effort to target specific longevity. I know now that a tire can be manufactured to last a very long time. I proved it. I also understand why a manufacturer may not want a tire to last so long. If the compound wears for this distance, tire internals may go bad before it visibly wears out. But it also means a tire shouldn't wear out prematurely if it's within spec for the respective vehicle.

Prior to this experience I was a Michelin fan. After it, I was going to adopt a baby and name it 'Michelin'. But going through two sets of 65k-rated tires in the last 75k is enough for me to abandon the brand.

I have a very difficult time believing this was a 'fluke'. Given the liability involved in manufacturing tires the makers must have tight controls on compounds and associated characteristics. It only makes me dislike Michelin that much more for improperly advertising as 65k the two garbage sets I wore though.
My Ridgeline went through a set of Michelin Latitudes (purchased from a Honda Dealer in Spokane Wash. USA) in 52,000 kilometers of highway use. Rotated semi-annualy, always correct tire pressures. Completely turned me off Michelin branded anything.
 

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I am involved in a tire shop, and I have never experienced a tire lasting 127k miles. Even half of this mileage is rare. Must have been kevlar or something in the compound...

What mostly affects tire life, is too low pressure. 10 % below recommended pressure may result in as much as a 30 % reduction of a tires life according to studies. An increase of pressure above recommended level, resulted in minor increase in wear.

Besides, tire pressure naturally also affects fuel consumption. Checking and adjusting tire pressure on a regular basis and also always when hauling heavy loads, will save you both tires and fuel.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
My Ridgeline went through a set of Michelin Latitudes (purchased from a Honda Dealer in Spokane Wash. USA) in 52,000 kilometers of highway use. Rotated semi-annualy, always correct tire pressures. Completely turned me off Michelin branded anything.
The fact you got them from a dealership is a significant data point. I discussed my experience with a local dealer I've been using, both expressing my surprise at getting 127k out of the original set, and my disappointment with the following two sets, and he argued that tire manufacturers actually tailor tire compounds to accommodate specific distributor demands. In other words, he argued that a dealership benefits from longer-wearing compounds (as it justifies a higher price and contributes to the vehicle's low requirements for service), while a place like Costco benefits from shorter-wearing compounds (simply to sell more tires).

I argue he's full of it and only wants me to spring for his $1000 tire quote, which isn't going to happen.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
... I have never experienced a tire lasting 127k miles. Even half of this mileage is rare.
This has been my experience, too. The closest I've ever gotten before was a set of Michelins back in the 80s on a classic Cadillac I was driving. Got almost 80k out of them, with careful maintenance and rotation. I believe the tire was rated for longevity; maybe 70 or 75k? I don't remember.

I was amazed the Honda tires lasted as long as they did. Keep in mind--they were worn down to the point where you could see and feel the tread but there was little left to provide traction. Hydroplaning was a problem.

I didn't even take care of them. Never checked the pressure and only rotated them once. Almost all of the mileage was highway and a lot of it relatively high speed (75+ mph). When the tires past the 100k mark, I almost went to the dealer to buy a set to keep on-hand, but figured 'they are Michelins--surely a new set will be just as good'.

Not so. Guess I'll be switching brands this time around.
 

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The oem Michelins dry rotted in about 4 years. Lots of tread but cracks in the tread grooves. I bought Toyo open country at 2 years they wore out. I now run cooper at3. I only have 73000 on my 2007 ridge. I do not know the exact mileages but I figure the Toyo was a poor compound to wear out so fast. The Michelins were junk to dry rot so fast. So far the cooper has been good. Go figure???
 
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