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Discussion Starter #1

I wouldn't even attempt it although I don't have oversized rubber or a leveling kit. Fairly impressive though. The Tacoma isn't breaking a sweat. My guess is that the G2 trannie would overheat.

This is obviously wayyyy outside the realm of what 99.99% of RL owners would attempt, but it's fun to watch regardless.

Thank you Gary Flint!
 

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The 2020 should handle it just fine with its ultra-low first gear. A mild lift and decent tires would seal the deal.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You're quite possibly right Longboat. It's the constant stopping and starting that would have me worried. Although I don't think Roman from TFL gave the G2 a fair shake (or knew how to drive it off-road), he didn't get far in the midsize off-road comparo from a few years back without having to stop and let the transmission cool down. The grade and technical nature in the above video is far beyond what TFL ever tried; Gold Mine Hill included.
 

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Not relevant to why we purchased our Ridgeline, when I want to do some real off-road traversing, I'll get out my vehicle which was designed to do just that, my Chevy K-10. Why are folks so intent on purchasing a vehicle that does it's own thing so very well, in fact, it is the absolute best in it's class, and try to turn it into something so totally against it's nature?

Bill
 

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That is actually pretty cool. Wonder what mods it has. Obviously more aggressive tires, probably a transmission cooler, and looks like maybe lifted. Other than that looks just like my old silver 2007 RL.

One thing I liked about the G1 was the ability to lock it into 4WD in 1st, 2nd and reverse. I'm not an "off roader", but heading up the big, steep, grassy hill at the lake it was a nice feeling to hit that button, though my G2 has gone up it without complaint as well.
 

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Just because you "can" do something does not necessarily mean it is a good idea...

Yep, the all wheel drive will git er done but the terrain in the video is not what the RL is designed to do. If I want to travel in similar or worse terrain I just trailer my Polaris Rzr SXS behind my 19 RL as it would not even break a sweat running trails like that. The many large rocks that they went over are all opportunities for a disaster and if it comes to that just how in the hell are you going to get your RL out of there?

:eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited by Moderator)
Not relevant to why we purchased our Ridgeline, when I want to do some real off-road traversing, I'll get out my vehicle which was designed to do just that, my Chevy K-10. Why are folks so intent on purchasing a vehicle that does it's own thing so very well, in fact, it is the absolute best in it's class, and try to turn it into something so totally against it's nature?

Bill
Good question. People have the right to do what they want, but I agree difficult off-road trails are not the RL's cup of tea. That being said, I found the video impressive even though I wouldn't attempt that particular trail. There are some light to medium trails in the mountains of Colorado that are much more suited to the RL and other SUVs with clearance beyond that of a car. We have enjoyed them over the years without issue. I didn't buy the RL as an off-road machine, but it isn't entirely incapable of doing some light off-roading.

Just because you "can" do something does not necessarily mean it is a good idea...

Yep, the all wheel drive will git er done but the terrain in the video is not what the RL is designed to do. If I want to travel in similar or worse terrain I just trailer my Polaris Rzr SXS behind my 19 RL as it would not even break a sweat running trails like that. The many large rocks that they went over are all opportunities for a disaster and if it comes to that just how in the hell are you going to get your RL out of there?

:eek:
Agreed. Different strokes I guess. I'm happy to watch others tackle trails like this. It's fun to watch what a lifted RL with property tires can actually do from an offroading standpoint. My question was more about the G2 and how if equally modified could it handle the same trail vs the G1. Different all wheel drive systems; the VTM lock may offer some advantages in this type of terrain.
 

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Agreed. Different strokes I guess. I'm happy to watch others tackle trails like this. It's fun to watch what a lifted RL with property tires can actually do from an offroading standpoint. My question was more about the G2 and how if equally modified could it handle the same trail vs the G1. Different all wheel drive systems; the VTM lock may offer some advantages in this type of terrain.
G2 w/ 9spd has much lower first gear, so that will be biggest advantage. G2 has a little more power than G1, but i think that won't make a difference here. G2 is slightly lighter, has slightly less GC, likely has better visibility around edges, G2 is a little longer which could hurt in tight quarters. I think the rear "diff" will "lock" in Sand mode at low speeds.
 

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@Rubberneck the person in the video above, is member @S.T.U.V he still frequently runs his G1 harder or as hard as any member here ever has, maybe he would have some additional in site. He also has many more videos posted with links here and on Youtube
 

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Discussion Starter #10
@Rubberneck the person in the video above, is member @S.T.U.V he still frequently runs his G1 harder or as hard as any member here ever has, maybe he would have some additional in site. He also has many more videos posted with links here and on Youtube
Thanks Carsmak! I will search for some of his other videos. He's braver than I am:)
 

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G2 w/ 9spd has much lower first gear, so that will be biggest advantage. G2 has a little more power than G1, but i think that won't make a difference here.
In situations of off-roading, power can quickly become your enemy, especially where snow and ice are present. As a teenager my friends and I used to run circles around those high lifted, over-powered, fat tired, beasts with our lil 4-banger CJ3A, we sure irritated the hell out of quite a few of those over-ego'd guys on many a hunting trip!

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Regardless of what everyone thinks, it's good to see some activity in the off-road part of the forum. I've actually been around for awhile, but it's like Fort Knox getting back in here so I've changed my user-name for the third time. My password must have expired again, and I'm guilty of not writing it down. I have owned both a G1 and G2 and although I liked the creature comforts of the G2 more, I've had to pull off several times to let the transmission cool on some basic (albeit steep) forest service roads. I am in Colorado so elevation is certainly a factor. I wasn't towing anything, but did have two small dirt bikes in the back. Please don't tell me I should have purchased a Tacoma as I'm a big dude (225ish, 6-1), and my kids are all over 6 feet so rear leg room and general every day comfort were more important than off-road ability. That being said, with the limited commercials that Honda has done for the RL, it is touted as a lifestyle machine and towing dirtbikes on forest service roads isn't an unreal expectation. I was among the first to buy a 2017 RL and although a great highway and day to day cruiser, it underwhelmed me with creaks/rattles, and other minor annoyances. Both generations are great, and I blame myself for buying the first year rendition of a much needed reface. I do believe that Gary Flint and his team did a superior job from an engineering standpoint than the bean counters did with the G2. Having said that, I am impressed with the towing ability of the G2. The Ike Gauntlet comes to mind first and foremost.
 

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Just my opinion here . . .Biggest thing G2 has going against it for this kind of stuff is the cost. Personally, there is no way I would take a $20K plus vehicle into situations like this. Even modified with a lift, tires, skid plate etc it is just too likely that damage will be done. Even if its just cosmetic, an expensive vehicle has now become worth a lot less. For the same reason, I wouldn't take my 14 GenI with <50kmiles on it.
I can see liking the challenge though so using an older GenI starts to make some sense to me. Stock, its not a serious off roader. Knowing how to do the repairs and mods all yourself is part of the experience giving you satisfaction when you take your vehicle to places most didn't think was possible. If you screw up, its a bit more OK. Junk yard parts are available and you didn't ruin you brand new $40k plus black edition or for that matter your $60k Gladiator Rubicon.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Just my opinion here . . .Biggest thing G2 has going against it for this kind of stuff is the cost. Personally, there is no way I would take a $20K plus vehicle into situations like this. Even modified with a lift, tires, skid plate etc it is just too likely that damage will be done. Even if its just cosmetic, an expensive vehicle has now become worth a lot less. For the same reason, I wouldn't take my 14 GenI with <50kmiles on it.
I can see liking the challenge though so using an older GenI starts to make some sense to me. Stock, its not a serious off roader. Knowing how to do the repairs and mods all yourself is part of the experience giving you satisfaction when you take your vehicle to places most didn't think was possible. If you screw up, its a bit more OK. Junk yard parts are available and you didn't ruin you brand new $40k plus black edition or for that matter your $60k Gladiator Rubicon.
Yes, I wonder how many Gladiator Rubicons actually see off-road usage beyond dirt trails. If I had a 90k Range Rover, I wouldn't take it anywhere like this.
 

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Yes, I wonder how many Gladiator Rubicons actually see off-road usage beyond dirt trails. If I had a 90k Range Rover, I wouldn't take it anywhere like this.
We have an SUV that's well-known as an off-road warrior - lots of suspension travel, hill creep switches, etc. - but it's a nice, fairly expensive machine....no Rubicon adventure with that vehicle! :)
 

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In the 90's, our Boy Scout leader was using a 1983 Mitsubishi pick up to haul our gear when we'd go camping. He bought the truck new and used it until all of his kids finished scouting...base model, 2wd 4spd. To get up roads like STUV did in the video, we'd climb in the bed to add weight and some of the guys would stand on the rear bumper. With the ground clearance of a sedan and 14" tires...that low budget "Mitsu-shitsi" took us everywhere. The problem with the RL is that it cost $37k more than the Mitsu. did back in 83. Like Eurban said, why risk damaging a vehicle like this. Quoting the 2009 RL sales brochure "Pickup Trucks Have Always Been About Muscle, Backbone, and Testosterone" next to a photograph of a RL slinging dust and gravel on a dirt road. While I love taking my RL off-road, to avoid damage you have to do what STUV did...know your vehicle's limits, drive slowly, have a spotter when necessary, and try not to center over large rocks (ask me how I know, big thank you Mr. Burtman for the oil pan saving skid plate).
Based on the (G1) sales brochures, there's clearly some disconnect between the RL engineers and their marketing team. Check out the rest of STUV's youtube videos, pretty awesome!
 

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In the 90's, our Boy Scout leader was using a 1983 Mitsubishi pick up to haul our gear when we'd go camping. He bought the truck new and used it until all of his kids finished scouting...base model, 2wd 4spd. To get up roads like STUV did in the video, we'd climb in the bed to add weight and some of the guys would stand on the rear bumper. With the ground clearance of a sedan and 14" tires...that low budget "Mitsu-shitsi" took us everywhere. The problem with the RL is that it cost $37k more than the Mitsu. did back in 83. Like Eurban said, why risk damaging a vehicle like this. Quoting the 2009 RL sales brochure "Pickup Trucks Have Always Been About Muscle, Backbone, and Testosterone" next to a photograph of a RL slinging dust and gravel on a dirt road. While I love taking my RL off-road, to avoid damage you have to do what STUV did...know your vehicle's limits, drive slowly, have a spotter when necessary, and try not to center over large rocks (ask me how I know, big thank you Mr. Burtman for the oil pan saving skid plate).
Based on the (G1) sales brochures, there's clearly some disconnect between the RL engineers and their marketing team. Check out the rest of STUV's youtube videos, pretty awesome!
Someone here said the RL is more of an "off pavement" than an "off road" vehicle, and I think that describes it reasonable well. That's what I need.
 

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That was very impressive. There were a few SUVs up there at the 12:35 mark. did they come up a different way I wonder... it looks like the trail on the other side was much smoother with fewer rocks.
 

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Honda chopped a few inches off of the rear of the Pilot, jacked the vehicle up an inch, changed the front end and called it a Passport as their entry into the "soft off-roader" market. No reason they couldn't go a bit further with the Ridgeline (beefed-up transmission, skid plates, locker) and release a "Ridgeline Baja" model with increased off-road capability.

Not many people know this, but Honda Racing won the Baja 500 off-road race 2 years in a row with their Ridgeline entry. Honda knows how to do this. Certainly don't expect to see a full Baja-capable model for us regular folks, but it would be nice to have a more rugged, off-road oriented choice in the Honda lineup. :)

401535


 
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