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I tried to read the Honda Link User Agreement, which came page after page until, as I suspect they want, you just give up and click Accept. But here's my question to you smart guys out there......

Does my new 2020 TRL-E tattle on me to insurance? How fast I drive, how hard I brake, how often I use my blinker, etc.

There is A LOT of new technology out there now called Telematics, and I have to believe that Honda Link is an extension of that and if my info is used for MM and to keep Honda apprised of my milage and when they should start marketing my next oil change in my emails, as a for instance, I have no problem with that.

I do have an issue if my car is merely a data collection vehicle (no pun intended) for "big insurance" to keep tabs on me and analyze, scrutinize, and in general be in my "business." But through the lawyer speak, I honestly cannot tell.

What say you all?
 

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Honda Link is basically a useless gimmick on the RL. On other models with the newest generation infotainment containing a telematics module, Honda Link can remote start your vehicle, lock and unlock thru the app and phone 911 if the air bags go off in a crash. Most of this functionality requires paying a fee. I’m not sure what data the app collects but it requires a blue tooth connection thru your smart phone to get data. On the RL if you don’t install the app no data is transferred over the internet. BTW speed, braking force, accelerator pedal position and other parameters are electronically stored in various modules in your vehicle. I‘m not a lawyer either but I believe this data is available to law enforcement in the event of a crash investigation. Not sure if this data which is available to Honda thru the service connector, can be used todeny warranty coverage. See the link below for more information
 

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It is your cell phone that rats on you - it sees where you are, knows where you have been, knows how fast you've been going. With camera's on the roads - soon you will get speeding tickets via cell phone and picture of the driver. Computers are now fast enough to geo-fence all highways and create electronic speeding tickets - also give tickets to slow drivers in the fast lane.
With the sudden drop in tax revenue due to lockdown - expect every state to adjust the price of tickets to the minimum wage at the time the law was enacted and adjust to today's minimum wage.
I remember my father got a 55 in a 45 ticket in 1953 - it was $100 - that was 200 hours at $0.50 /hours thats why old folks don't speed as much as young drivers. Today that is 8 hours to pay for it - not enough incentive not to speed. Adjusted for inflation the $100 ticket will now be $1600. Bet that will slow you down.
Almost every vehicle sold in America since 2006 has a digital black box recorder that law enforcement and the vehicles manufacturer can read after a major crash.
My 2 cents.
 
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I‘m not a lawyer either but I believe this data is available to law enforcement in the event of a crash investigation.
IANAL either but read somewhere that onboard diags have been used as Cbayman says.

Maybe 10 years ago I had a State Farm-sponsored OBD module and got insurance rate discounts for a few years until they discontinued and/or started to charge for it. I don't believe HondaLink "tattles" to insurance companies though. At least, I haven't seen anything that suggests that, despite that it likely could be used for such.

I'm more paranoid than most about Big Brother, work very hard to keep my Location and Public Information/Online profiles private, but don't think HL is much of a scold. Will like to hear from others about it though.
 

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I tried to read the Honda Link User Agreement, which came page after page until, as I suspect they want, you just give up and click Accept.
Browsing such agreements on a webpage is difficult indeed. FYI attached are searchable PDFs of each of the documents linked on this HondaLink Legal Terms webpage as of this date.

I do have an issue if my car is merely a data collection vehicle (no pun intended) for "big insurance" to keep tabs on me and analyze, scrutinize, and in general be in my "business." But through the lawyer speak, I honestly cannot tell.

What say you all?
OPINION about the topic in general:
  1. We should all realize that in this modern world of data-related services and the benefits they allegedly provide, when we elect to enjoy those services and alleged benefits we enter the complex realm of data sharing and information privacy, which is inevitably loaded with and governed by "lawyer speak"
  2. If one is really concerned about information privacy / has concerns in that realm, then one must get informed (educate oneself) about the associated "lawyer speak" and plow through the terms and conditions of each of the services one is concerned about
  3. Nope, that isn't easy, but there's no shortcuts. One can ask other folk's opinions about specific situations (as you have in your OP) but ultimately those opinions don't mean squat and don't truly inform you about any specific data use / sharing situation
  4. If one has concerns / issues about the use of what's often referred to as "anonymized data" by "big insurance" / 'big business' then one should probably never opt to use any data-related service. IMO that's the biggest form of shared data within the data-related service industry, is likely pervasive, and likely can't be selectively eliminated by anyone participating in the use of such services.
  5. If one has concerns / issues about the use of what's often referred to as "personalized data" then you're back to the difficult task described in point 2 above, and in some cases exercising specific opt-out provisions provided by some data-related service providers.
As a general comment, IMO the US lags behind the EU in terms of data privacy issues of the sort you raise; research GDPR for evidence of that.

As a general comment, I tend to agree with @larryr's point above: there's probably much more info (both anonymized and personalized) available to those driven to get and use such available from sources other than HondaLink. If that's of concern / an issue for you, then you probably need to opt-out of most all modern data-related services / forego the use of all modern tech devices.

As a general comment, if one is averse to to the principle of allowing 'big business' to use data about oneself, whether anonymized or personal, then one risks acquiring a never-ending obsession with all of the personal toll such an obsession may entail; developing paranoia is a real risk.

Not suggesting that a head-in-the-sand attitude / approach is is good for any of us, but it's a delicate balance lest we do develop paranoid tendencies. Good luck finding a healthy balance for yourself.
 

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My insurance company still uses the driving record method to charge risk surcharges. If you get 3 points or more on your driving record there is a significant surcharge until the points go away. If offered a significant discount for participating in a OBD2 dongle program I would be tempted as I’m a pretty conservative driver with a clean record.
As for HL, it’s practically useless on the RL so dont download the app and you don’t have to bother with all that HL legal stuff.
The first page of the owners manual has information regarding the on-board Event Data and Service Diagnostic Recorders. EDR data is 30 seconds of freeze frame data and is only recorded in the event of a significant collision. However, SDR data is continuously recorded and available to Honda presumably thru the OBD2 connector. Something to be aware of if you’re in the habit of brake torque launching your RL!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank's all. Bottom Line: No one KNOWS. If I really want to know, do my research. Got it.
 

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Like virtually all modern vehicles, the Ridgeline collects data from more than just the supplemental restraint (airbag) system and not just at the time of a collision.

The Ridgeline does not have a built-in cellular modem like some Hondas (Accord, Insight, Pilot, Passport, Odyssey, and RDX), so it is physically incapable of sharing data wirelessly unless you established a Wi-Fi or Bluetooth connection to a device that has in internet connection.

Honda models that have cellular modems can and do communicate wirelessly even without the customer paying for a data plan. I still get monthly emails showing the status of various systems in the 2019 RDX that I haven't owned in a year and a half. These vehicles can download updates without a customer-paid data connection as well. Behind the scenes, Honda is paying for a data connection even if you don't.

The mechanism is in place to allow dealers, Honda, and third parties to access information that you have given permission to share through cellular, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, USB, and ODB II port connections. That permission is typically granted simply by driving the vehicle and using the infotainment system. Sometimes, data is not shared by default unless you opt-in. Other times, data is shared by default unless you opt-out. Such information is extremely valuable to the automakers and third parties because it provides a way for them to know how their products are being used. Garmin wants to know how their navigation systems are being used and how often the software crashes. Bosch wants to know how their cameras and radar sensors are working in the real world. Honda wants to know how often drivers use sport mode. Panasonic wants to know how loud people listen to the radio.

All those terms that you agree to when you install a new app on your computer or smartphone, update your operating system, or set up a new device such as a television, thermostat, light bulb, etc. contain legal terminology that grants permission for others to collect data about how the product is being used.

So, it's not only possible, but very likely that your insurance company knows how your Ridgeline is being driven. It's less likely that they know it's you driving. Chances are, it's mostly anonymized data that insurance companies see such as "Honda Ridgeline Black Edition owners tend to drive more aggressively as a whole while RTS owners often leave their vehicles unlocked while parked and RTL-E drivers tend to drive with more distractions such as high radio volume and frequent phone calls".

If your insurance company was tracking you and your location specifically and raised your rates because you usually leave your Ridgeline unlocked while parked at a honky tonk every evening after work then speed and weave all over the road on the way home, privacy watchdogs would be all over this.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
A well reasoned, and reasonable reply, zroger73. Thank you for sharing these thoughts with us all.
 

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Insurance companies also gather data from all the “CARFAX data companies” that gathers Info on almost every vehicle repair service from simple oil changes, glass, body shop and dealer services.

They also download state DMV Records monthly for vehicles and drivers.
 
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