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Never used it. Never will. I like the RL performance just the way it is.
I like it primarily because it reduces accelerator pedal response for smoother, more comfortable takeoff while still allowing wide-open throttle if I need to pass or merge quickly.

To make vehicles feel more powerful than they really are, manufacturers have taken advantage of electronic throttle control's ability to open the throttle blade more than the relative the position of the accelerator pedal. By aggressively opening the throttle with a minimum of pedal travel, a vehicle can be made to feel more powerful on initial tip-in than it really is. Unfortunately, most of the throttle blade opening occurs early on in pedal travel so when you push the accelerator further, there little additional power available.

Take the HR-V, for example. Around town, its tiny 1.8L engine feels pretty peppy. However, that's an illusion. Honda have mapped the throttle so it opens about 50% with only about 25% accelerator pedal travel. Since you're "giving the car more gas" than you think you are, it feels powerful. If you continue to press the accelerator pedal further, not much happens except more noise as the little engine revs up.
 

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Unlike ECON mode, VCM actually does save fuel and therefore must be operational at all times as a function of the EPA estimates. If VCM could be disabled by the driver with the press of a button, the vehicle would have to be tested by the EPA with the feature off and Honda could no longer claim "best in class" fuel economy. There is currently no system in place for separate sets of EPA estimates with and without fuel saving technologies enabled and disabled.
I can't imagine the regulations say that, but if you can point me to the CFR language stating such a requirement and that the manufacturer is prohibited from providing a means to disable a certain feature that affects the EPA MPG test results (which would include a whole lot of features), I'd like to see it.
It seems totally impractical if not impossible to meet that, given there are dozens of factors that affect fuel economy.

There is a suite of tests, each one for a specific purpose (EPA updates/changes them periodically). Some of these might not engage VCM at all.
Air conditioner cycling is part of one of the test suites. Can you imagine the manufacturer only allowing the driver to match the A/C test pattern of the EPA tests and the driver could not manually run the A/C longer or shorter than the test pattern, or turn it off completely, if they choose?
 

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I've used it a number of times for highway driving with trips consisting of 500 Kms one way without Eco and return with it on while using cruise control. There was never really a difference in litres used per 100 Kms.
 

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700 mile trip in one day and the Econ button is a terrible implementation. It requires a totally different application of a learned habit used in all the other cars I drive including two others that have Econ mode.
Turning it off it drives like a regular vehicle. Turned on it is a frustrating experience.
Honda could do a lot better than this....
 

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700 mile trip in one day and the Econ button is a terrible implementation. It requires a totally different application of a learned habit used in all the other cars I drive including two others that have Econ mode.
Turning it off it drives like a regular vehicle. Turned on it is a frustrating experience.
Honda could do a lot better than this....
Just leave it off if it bothers you that much. Personally, I like it. It makes for a smoother drive. WOT is still WOT whether it's on or off in case you need to get out of the way.
 

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I had previously said that I'd never use it. That still stands up to a point. I'll turn it on for approximately 5 seconds on Saint Patrick's day just for the green icon, lol. :clover:
 

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If hardly ever use it almost never in any of our Hondas, not a fan of the lack of throttle response. However if on a long highway trip with cruise control on and especially in the summer with the AC on, i'll turn it on where throttle response won't be noticed. I've noticed that the RL especially on summer gas puts down some pretty good mpg numbers compared to an Odyssey we once owned. Probably about 4 mpg difference for the routes that we take. Pretty darn good if you ask me.
 

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Unlike ECON mode, VCM actually does save fuel and therefore must be operational at all times as a function of the EPA estimates. If VCM could be disabled by the driver with the press of a button, the vehicle would have to be tested by the EPA with the feature off and Honda could no longer claim "best in class" fuel economy. There is currently no system in place for separate sets of EPA estimates with and without fuel saving technologies enabled and disabled.
I hear you on the VCM but what's your take on start/stop that can be turned off on an MDX for example?
 

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I hear you on the VCM but what's your take on start/stop that can be turned off on an MDX for example?
"If your car stays in the mode you left it the last time you drove, chances are good the EPA window-sticker mileage reflects some or all of its driving modes. But if your car defaults back to a default mode, chances are the EPA mileage only reflects that mode. That's why those window stickers say, as always, that your mileage may vary." - https://www.cars.com/articles/2013/06/do-all-those-driving-modes-affect-a-cars-epa-gas-mileage/

"It turns out the effects of stop-start systems aren't baked into the EPA fuel economy estimates for the very cars that use such systems." - https://www.edmunds.com/car-reviews/features/do-stop-start-systems-really-save-fuel.html

VCM can't be switched off, so its effects are included in EPA estimates.

Idle stop and/or ECON modes probably aren't included in EPA estimates unless the vehicle defaults to that mode at each restart or the manufacturer can prove that most drivers use that feature.
 

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Thanks for the links Zroger. VCM must really have a good impact on MPG's to make it mandatory. Interesting how a manufacturer would add stop/start/eco mode at any cost if it isn't factored into the EPA figures.
 

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Thanks for the links Zroger. VCM must really have a good impact on MPG's to make it mandatory. Interesting how a manufacturer would add stop/start/eco mode at any cost if it isn't factored into the EPA figures.
Based on what I've gathered from some of the more meaningful posts in the "VCM Muzzler" thread, it has cost some owners 1-3 MPG by using a defeat device. This won't bankrupt owners, but even 1 MPG is a big deal to manufacturers.

It costs Honda a few dollars for a momentary pushbutton and a few feet of wire to add an ECON button. The rest of the function is nothing but software. Even though it has almost no effect on fuel economy, it's a cheap investment to make people think it does.

Idle stop technology has the potential to save a significant amount of fuel, if the vehicle would normally spend a lot of time idling and there is no cooling or heating demand. In the real-world, it's an uncomfortable annoyance for most. It doesn't cost much to add this feature, either - basically a heavy-duty starter and some software.
 

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I have tired a couple of tanks with the Econ button on and off, noticed no difference in MPG. I'm not sure what the Econ button does or changes to the engine on the Ridgeline.
The Econ system in my Crosstour is automatic and can't be turned on and off manually. On the Crosstour the Econ system shuts down three cylinders from firing to save gas increasing MPG. From what I read here the Rigdeline button doesn't work the same as the Crosstour?
 

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The Econ button does what it is intended to do... it schedules a smaller amount of fuel per cm of pedal push. Which means slower starts from a stop, which is where the most fuel is burned. After a couple of years of hyper-miling with a TDI engine, I know how much a "normal" take-off from a stop kills MPG. The Econ button basically does what the "egg between your foot and the accelerator" concept has done for years. Don't like it, turn it off. But at the end of the day, if you pay attention to your sloppy acceleration habits, you WILL save fuel. Or, if you don't care, you won't. It's up to you.
 

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I'm not sure what the Econ button does or changes to the engine on the Ridgeline.
ECON mode in the Ridgeline does three things:

1. It reduces throttle sensitivity when the accelerator pedal is partially depressed. Fully depressing the accelerator pedal still results in wide-open throttle regardless of the setting of the ECON mode. When ECON mode is on, the driver has to physically push the pedal farther to get the same amount of power which makes the vehicle feel sluggish even though it isn't.

2. It makes changes to the HVAC including a lower fan speed and reduced compressor run time (which results in less cooling and dehumidification).

3. It allows more variation in the speed of the cruise control so that it loses more speed uphill and resumes using less acceleration.

The Econ system in my Crosstour is automatic and can't be turned on and off manually. On the Crosstour the Econ system shuts down three cylinders from firing to save gas increasing MPG. From what I read here the Rigdeline button doesn't work the same as the Crosstour?
It sounds like you're confusing the Ridgeline's ECON mode with the Crosstour's ECO indicator.

The Crosstour's ECO indicator comes on "while the engine is operating in its most economical range". It doesn't have an ECON mode or button.
 

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ECON mode in the Ridgeline does three things:

1. It reduces throttle sensitivity when the accelerator pedal is partially depressed. Fully depressing the accelerator pedal still results in wide-open throttle regardless of the setting of the ECON mode. When ECON mode is on, the driver has to physically push the pedal farther to get the same amount of power which makes the vehicle feel sluggish even though it isn't.

2. It makes changes to the HVAC including a lower fan speed and reduced compressor run time (which results in less cooling and dehumidification).

3. It allows more variation in the speed of the cruise control so that it loses more speed uphill and resumes using less acceleration.



It sounds like you're confusing the Ridgeline's ECON mode with the Crosstour's ECO indicator.

The Crosstour's ECO indicator comes on "while the engine is operating in its most economical range". It doesn't have an ECON mode or button.
Good explanation of the Ridgeline Econ button, thanks. When asked I was just wondering if it did anything like the Crosstour does by shutting of some of the cylinders. I realize the two systems work in different ways.

Seeing both the Crosstour and Rigdeline have basically the same engine, leads to to wonder. Why not use the Crosstour system in the Rigdeline or better yet use both systems in both vehicles? Just wondering.

Thanks again,
Craig
 
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