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Since I don't plan on getting an RTL, that means I can't have heated seats (not from the factory anyway) so would an engine block heater help the truck warm up faster? I've never had a vehicle that had one...that's what the little plug hanging out of the grill is--right? The coldest it gets here is typically 25F but that's unusual and it only happens around now when there isn't any cloud cover at night. Unfortunately, the Ridgeline won't be fitting in the garage either and more unfortunate is that it's been COLD here this year :eek: . Rain I can take, but not cold or heat or humidity. Will I be able to start the truck and turn on the heat (and actually get warm air) or will there still be a wait?
 

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It will help it warm up faster, but if the 6 is anything like the 4 in my wifes Civic, you don't have to worry. It heats up very fast, and our nights are much colder than what yours are.

Robert
 

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You certainly won't need an engine block heater if it barely gets below freezing in your local. All a block heater does is circulate the engine oil allowing easier engine starting in very cold conditions. It won't make the coolant any warmer. I can only assume Honda Canada is smart enough to include them with all the Canadian models though...
 

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The block heater is a heating element that goes into the coolant to warm it.

I'm not sure how much it would speed heat coming out inside the vehicle though.

-Trevor
HandA
 

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I had one on my F150 and 02 Mustang (canada rides). Car blows heat way faster with it plug in a few hours before you leave. ( helps deice faster)

I plan on getting one also, helps keep the block warm and less start knock.

H&A sells the kit for cheap, downside is you have to drain the coolant. :(

Mods, mods & more mods to buy :D
 

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Ctrl-Z said:
You certainly won't need an engine block heater if it barely gets below freezing in your local. All a block heater does is circulate the engine oil allowing easier engine starting in very cold conditions. It won't make the coolant any warmer. I can only assume Honda Canada is smart enough to include them with all the Canadian models though...
Some block heaters heat the oil. The Ridgelines' heats the coolant. It doesn't physically circulate the liquid but relies on conduction through the engine block and convection through the coolant itself to raise the liquid temperature by as much as 50 degrees. Engine warm up time will be shortened as will the the time taken for warm air to be available through the air vents.
 

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When I lived in Alaska I had an aftermarket (JC Whitmey) model that had a heating element and a pump. It was installed by cutting the heater hose line. This heated and circulated the coolant, therefore, your vehicle was toasty warm as soon as you started it up. You needed it on those -50F mornings :eek:
 

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There are a few different types of heaters, the one you are referring to, the block heater is put in place of a freeze plug on the engine block and as stated before when you take that freeze plug out, out comes the coolant! I ran a V6 Aerostar and 4 cyl. Escort through four winters in Anchorage, Alaska. The Aerostar was garaged, Escort wasn't and neither one had a block heater. I don't think that much would be gained in 25F weather by having a block heater installed. On the few mornings I've ran my heater in the Ridge this winter (~20F) by the time I've traveled the 1.7 miles to exit the subdivision and then turn the heater on, it's blowing warm air, though won't blow hot for a couple more minutes.

TL
 

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On the few mornings I've ran my heater in the Ridge this winter (~20F) by the time I've traveled the 1.7 miles to exit the subdivision and then turn the heater on, it's blowing warm air, though won't blow hot for a couple more minutes.
Just wondering why you are doing that. With the automatic climate control, I just leave it set normally. The fan stays off until the temp is warm enough, which is about 4 or 5 blocks. The exception to this is if you hit the defrost button.
 

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delphi7x10 said:
It will help it warm up faster, but if the 6 is anything like the 4 in my wifes Civic, you don't have to worry. It heats up very fast, and our nights are much colder than what yours are.

Robert
I've always been impressed with how quickly the new Honda engines warm up since a warm engine is a happy engine! Our constant winter temperature is usually about -7 degrees C....which is, what, about 25 degrees F. My garage keeps a tempterature of about +3 C. It only takes a few block for the RL to be blowing warm air (although fuel economy suffers). We will have a week or two below say -25 F and so a little heat in the engine keeps the oil etc. thin on start up.
 

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what about a remote start???
I live in the north east and i was going to get a remote car starter but the honda warms up before the end of my street which is less than an 1/2 mi. I feel like i saved $600
 

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I put a heater on the bottom of my oil pan on my Chevy Blazer. I was told that the engine block heater was better but that the oil pan heater was also good because it heated the oil and when you start your car the first few seconds when the oil splatters all around inside the engine is important. If the oil is really stiff then it doesn't splatter around much and that is not good.

I haven't actually installed my engine block heater on my Ridgeline yet. I have it but I will have my dealer install it when I do my first oil change. Just last month it was 24 degrees F below zero and when it is that cold I think an engine block heater is very important. I would plug mine in (after it is installed) when ever the temperature dropped below about 10 degrees F. When the temperature is below zero F then I would plug it in for sure.

.
 

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Many years ago when you use to put 30W oil in your vehicle, then change over to 15 or 20W in winter it was because at colder temperatures the 30W would get thick and not flow through the engine until the engine warmed up. The 15W was thinner and flowed sooner. This is why you would install a block heater.
But these days with 5-20W oil (they even have 0W), at colder temps the oil is 5W which is very thin and flowable. The engine does not have to be warm for the oil to easily circulate throughout the engine.
The only reason that I see for having a block heater is so the passenger cabin will warm up faster. The coolant circulating type of heater would be the most effective type for heating the interior. (Correct me if I am wrong).
 

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Here's another reason to have a block heater that had not occurred to me before.
According to the EPA, it will tend to increase gas mileage. Makes sense.

http://www.ridgelineownersclub.com/forums/showpost.php?p=62538&postcount=172 (thanks flymuck!)

We had block heaters in all the rigs on the farm when I was a kid. I remember how nice it was to (a) have the engine turn over easily, just like in the summer, rather than to hear that dreaded dying battery sound when you go to start it up first thing in the morning, and (b) quick cabin heat!
 

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While stationed in Alaska I used the freeze out plug style in one car and the radiator recurculating style in another. I found that the recurculating type warmed up the engine quicker. We also installed an interior heater (110 volt) that mounted under the dash. This helped greatly even when the temp was as low as -40 degrees (F).
 

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I've had block heaters on every vehicle I've owned since '84. Some were factory installed (when I ordered the vehicle instead of buying off the lot).
Others were dealer added as part of the deal. I even had one installed on a 10yr old Dodge Spirit I bought used.

I always use factory model, although JCWhitney used to have several different types available. Factory ones tend to be a simple heating element that goes in place of a freeze plug in the block (hence the name).

Ridgeline block heater goes in place of the threaded block drain plug. Enough easier than digging out a freeze plug that I plan on doing it myself.

My rule of thumb is I don't bother plugging in unless it's going below 20F overnight.

I have things rigged up so it _should_ unplug itself if someone drives off without unplugging. I also have an orange trailer hitch ball cover that I stick on the shift lever when plugged in as a reminder.

I've also seen battery heater plates, oil pan heaters, circulating heaters for in the heater line, and ones that go in the large radiator hoses. When I was a kid we had an "electric dipstick" we used.

Mark
 

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As long as you don't see temps lower than 20F, I wouldn't bother with a block heater, the engine seems to warm up real quickly. A block heater will help warm up quicker, but not by a whole lot. Block heaters are an inefficient way of heating the oil, which is the most important issue with cold starting. Around here, the dealers all install block heaters, and flexible silicone fabric heaters to both the oil pan and the battery. The local government advises plugging in all the heaters any time the temps are below 20F for pollution reasons, and when it gets down to -50 or colder, the engine simply will not crank if not heated first.
 

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Dare I bring up Amsoil or anyother synthetic for the very cold ungaraged Ridge's.
This will help the engine not squeel or knock like they can from severe cold.
I dont think a block heater would benefit you unless the ambient temp dropped to teens or zero.
 
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