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I was wondering how many RL owners have access to, or use, ethanol-free fuel. I have been using it lately, and I am getting, according to my RL's on-board average fuel display, significantly better gas mileage. I'm not certain how accurate the RL's average fuel calculations are, but it seems very promising. I was averaging about 23.1 mpg overall with 10% ethanol (and a VCMuzzler), and now I am slightly over 25 mpg through three tanks of ethanol-free fuel. On my next fill-up I will begin manually calculating my fuel mileage to see if there is actually an improvement.
 

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Yes ethanol kills milage considerably. Ethanol free is getting scarcer by the day. In Canada, both Shell and Petro Canada use 10% in regular, 5% in midrange and no ethanol in Super. Unfortunately the higher cost offsets the MPG gains so it becomes a draw at the end of the day. If one could find a station the has no ethanol in regular gas that would be the best for the RL for economy. Bottom line is 10% ethanol reduces milage about 3% so about 1 mpg or less on the RL. Not all that huge IMHO.

FYI, EPA figures are produced with ethanol free gas on all cars/trucks, makes you wonder why when 95% of gas sold contains ethanol. This changed with 2017 model year vehicles as they now actually use E10 to reflect better the figures obtained. In a nutshell, the RL EPA figures were done with E10 gas.
 

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I ran 89 octane e-free in a 4cyl Ford Escape and I would have sworn on a stack of bibles that it would have gotten better mileage but it really didn't. I figure I'll try it again too on my RL to see if anything is better but I'm not as hopeful this time. I ran it for around 1000mi exclusively. It seems to be better too when the temps are hot out. Probably something to do with how the ethanol affects combustion. Dunno.... just noticeable on the "feel" of power delivered when driving.

I did notice that on the Escape 2.5 4cyl engine that it was more responsive down low and mid range in the RPM's. Probably more power available there so it felt like it would be better fuel mileage.

Steve
 

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I use ethanol free fuel in all my engines, including my new RLT-E. I use it in my Yamaha 4 stroke boat outboard, my lawn equipment, and especially in my two hot rods, 1953 F-100 ( 302 Ford racing engine ) and my 34 Chevy ( ZZ-4 350 Hi pro engine ). Ethanol is crap and does lots of damage to engines and other fuel system components, especially on boats. We have a few places here to get it as there is a lot of boating. I use 93 grade in the hot rods.
 
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I only use ethanol free premium and get 25-26 highway mpg


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Most of my fill ups have been with ethanol free 91 octane Gulf fuel (only ethanol free option). Every couple tanks I may have to fill up elsewhere but I try to plan my fill ups at our local ethanol free gulf station. I do realize superior MPGs in warmer weather.
 

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I agree with the premise that the warmer weather improves the mileage. I have really seen the increase since it has warmed up down here in Southeast Louisiana. Ethanol is a scam perpetrated on us by the government. It decreases mileage, increases emissions, and is corrosive to your fuel system. The EPA is requiring auto manufacturers to comply with unreachable mileage requirements while at the same time polluting our fuels with ethanol, which reduces mileage. What nonsense. Maybe Trump will take care of the ethanol fraud also.
 

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...Ethanol is a scam perpetrated on us by the government...
Umm...I would include corporate agriculture (rhymes with "Don Santo"), the corn-growing states and their congressional representatives in this conspiracy theory. A 2007 federal law (Renewable Fuel Standards) mandates ethanol production, not the EPA. Environmentalists don't support ethanol either because it's distilled using electricity mostly from coal-fired power plants, and increased corn production for ethanol has its own downsides, such as more herbicides, pesticides and soil erosion. Follow the money to find all the culprits.

I've been using "StarTron" enzyme fuel treatment to stabilize gas and guard against possible ethanol damage in my gas engines. The local small engine equipment dealer recommends it. I buy it in the large size so the cost is not very significant, but I don't use it for every fill-up because of the inconvenience. If we are to believe the automakers, modern vehicles are designed to run on E-10 gas without damage. Not everyone agrees...
 

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Ethanol free-fuel is not allowed to be sold at service stations (or marinas) around here. I'd have to drive 100 miles round trip to get it. Consider yourselves lucky if you have it available. I probably wouldn't bother putting it in the vehicles, but would love to use it in the boat.
 
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Yup, corn farmers around here are now plowing fence row to fence row, and in many cases taking out fences and brush to create massive monoculture fields. This results in habitat fragmentation, and makes it much easier for predators such as fox, raccoon and coyotes to find upland-nesting birds (including pheasants and ducks, among many others). Hunters and Ducks Unlimited should be fully up in arms over ethanol. But they have to walk a fine line with the primary landowners, who are farmers.

You can see increased erosion around here, too, as farmers have broken ground on steep hillsides that should never be broken. Drive by after a good rain and you can see the mud trails leaving the fields and going into the ditches.

I have two brothers who still farm. They are small-time, though, and they believe in leaving some habitat for wildlife. They leave steep hills for pasture and run livestock on them, and don't over-rated them.

Too many farms have become large corporate operations. Kids don't want to take over the family farm, so the farm gets sold to the nearest corporate neighbor. Sad times indeed.
 

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That corn juice is not good, no matter how you spin it. 100% gas, better mpg, power, and better for your engine. :smile: Tom
 

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I run 91-94 octane ethanol free fuel in all of my petrol fueled engines. The 94 octane ethanol free fuel is the shyte! Our 2.5L DGI Mazda 3 sport gets 7L/100km (33MPG) on it. My G1 gets 11L/100 (21MPG) on it. I would only assume that a direct injection Honda V6 engine would gain a bit more.
 

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It has been my understanding that regular e-gas reduces MPG by 10%; I won't argue with that either way as I don't know.

BUT ... today I purchased some E-free gas for my older lawn tractor. E-free gas was $2.45/gal (diesel at $2.29/gal) vs regular 89 octane gasoline (with e-added) at $1.99 gal. IF those 10% penalties are correct then e-gas is cheaper per driven mile, provided your vehicle is designed to use it.

AND ... todays vehicles ARE designed to operate on it - whereas older vehicles/ boats/ lawn equip may not be. For the 15- 20 gal. a year I use with my tractor I'll gladly pay the difference - just to be safe. For my OTR vehicles we use e-gas, to date all with out problems.

What I do question is all that corn being diverted to become a gas additive has greatly added to the cost of edible beef (cows ate a lot of corn before e-gas became popular).

YMMV.
 

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What I do question is all that corn being diverted to become a gas additive has greatly added to the cost of edible beef (cows ate a lot of corn before e-gas became popular).

YMMV.
Don't forget that dairy cows eat corn, too. Price of feed goes up, price of milk goes up, price of cheese goes up.

Now, when corn prices are high, like five years ago, then more land gets planted into corn, and less into other crops such as soybeans, alfalfa, oats and wheat. So then the price of those crops goes up, also. It's a vicious cycle, and only the middle man gets rich, and some corporate farms. The little farmers don't see any profits.

The price of wheat hit record highs a few year ago. Au contraire, you say...wheat and corn don't typically grow in the same climates/areas. That used to be the case, but they now have corn hybrids that do well in wheat country. You may have heard the term GMO (genetically-modified organism)....it's big in the corn industry.

Additionally, you used to have to rotate crops every year. Now they have corn hybrids that you only have to rotate every third year.

Again, who's making money off of ethanol? Middle men mostly (seed industry, fertilizer industry, pesticide industry, machinery (tractors/implements) industry, ethanol plants/corporations, corn lobbyists and some large corporate farms. It isn't helping the small family farmer that they like to portray in the commercials. That's just feel-good politics.

Ethanol is typically $0.25 per gallon cheaper in my neck of the woods. I will only purchase ethanol-free as long as I can. Yes, it costs me more $$, but I am not supporting a false economy, I purchase based on principles, and I can sleep well at night. :)
 

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Ethanol free does save on gas however the correct figure is 3% difference in economy when it comes to E10/ethanol free. Around here they sell regular gas with 10% ethanol content, mid grade with 5% and super is ethanol free. If you are wanting a saving then this does not work out as the expense of super compared to regular washes out any mpg economy that would have been gained and does end up costing you more at the end of the day. The 3% translates to at most 1 mpg savings on a good day, not much but welcome if ethanol free regular is available to you.

EPA testing has always been done with non ethanol gas however starting with all 2017 model year vehicles, they finally started using E10 which better reflects what 95% of of us actually use. I find it rather amusing on how long it takes for government to make changes in this case probably 10+ years over due! To be fair, they did mathematically correct the outcome to compensate for not using E10 so figures prior were still relatively correct.
 

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I'm not sure where you get your 3% figure. Can you supply a source? My personal experiences are closer to 1-2 mpg on the Ridge which is between 5-10%.

In much of the US (I'm in the mid atlantic) its pretty well impractical to use ethanol free fuel. Closet gas statations of 50 miles away and they want double the cost for ethanol free. Some still go to get fill for motorcycles and lawn equipment when putting these away for the winter but its really just not an option for a daily driver.

As an aside, when people offer their MPG experiences, giving ethanol content of the gas used and calculating by hand are crucial. . .Joe blow getting 29mpg on the highway with efree and the optimistic trip computer calculatoions isn't really compareable to someone using e10 and hand calculating. . .Aside over and out . .
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I can buy regular grade ethanol-free fuel here in Louisiana for about ten cents more per gallon than ethanol-polluted regular gas.
 

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I can buy regular grade ethanol-free fuel here in Louisiana for about ten cents more per gallon than ethanol-polluted regular gas.
Man, I wish it was that way here. The only place to get E-free around here is marinas. I have to drive around 60 miles round trip to pay at least a dollar more per gallon. I use E-free in all of my small engines since they get only seasonal use and are prone to gunked carbs if the E-crap sits in them for very long.
 

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I'm not sure where you get your 3% figure. Can you supply a source? My personal experiences are closer to 1-2 mpg on the Ridge which is between 5-10%.

In much of the US (I'm in the mid atlantic) its pretty well impractical to use ethanol free fuel. Closet gas statations of 50 miles away and they want double the cost for ethanol free. Some still go to get fill for motorcycles and lawn equipment when putting these away for the winter but its really just not an option for a daily driver.

As an aside, when people offer their MPG experiences, giving ethanol content of the gas used and calculating by hand are crucial. . .Joe blow getting 29mpg on the highway with efree and the optimistic trip computer calculatoions isn't really compareable to someone using e10 and hand calculating. . .Aside over and out . .
There are several well documented articles all over the web that state 3%. This is one of them. https://www.cars.com/articles/2013/12/another-reason-your-mileage-may-vary-for-the-worse-ethanol/
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Beware. I just read today that Mexico is threatening to refuse US corn imports. If that happens, we will have a lot more corn on our hands. I wouldn't be surprised if they try to increase ethanol percentage in fuel.
 
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