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Discussion Starter #1
:D
Drove my RTL through about 15 inches of Sierra snow last weekend and the truck outperformed my expectations. Stock Michelins are excellent. This truck is vastly superior to my F150 in winter conditions.
 
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Word has it that the guy who designed the Ford trucks was yanked over to Honda to build the 'Line. At least that's what I heard. Anyone else know for sure?
 

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From what I read from articles on the 'net, Gary Flint worked for GM for a long time before he came to Honda.
 

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Haven't heard that one yet. The Chief engineer of the Ridge was Gary Flint, he worked for GM for 15 years and moved to Honda (Honda R&D California) Also GM did offer the Composite Bed a few years back as a dealer option, as it turn out dealers did not promte it enofe plus the price so GM dropped it. PS: Luv My EX-L Ridge but need the Chevy to haul my Bobcats "Welcome to the global economy"
ladyridge said:
Word has it that the guy who designed the Ford trucks was yanked over to Honda to build the 'Line. At least that's what I heard. Anyone else know for sure?
 

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Question was the F150 a 2 or 4wd drive??? Just my opinion (be I right or wrong ) the AWD should shine under such conditions.
slim said:
:D
Drove my RTL through about 15 inches of Sierra snow last weekend and the truck outperformed my expectations. Stock Michelins are excellent. This truck is vastly superior to my F150 in winter conditions.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
F150 is 4 wheel drive, with excellent snow tires.

I've been in the Sierras for 21 years and lived in Colorado before that. Have had a lot of experience driving a variety of vehicles in snow. Currently own my 3rd Audi, also own an MDX, had 2 Subarus, had a Mercedes ML 320 (good in snow - crappy construction quality) - all good snow vehicles. Snow performance is a priority for me and like I said in my earlier post, the Ridge performed very well.

The ultimate snow vehicle remains the Audi Allroad. But it won't tow my boat nor does it have space for a muddy mountain bike.
 

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Thinking about snow tires

Sorry to raise this old post from the dead but I've got a question about the need for snow tires.

I live in NJ and have a terribly steep driveway that in the past has foiled my F150 4x4, without limited slip diff and no snow tires. Also my wife's new Toyota Sierra AWD with no snow tires has had trouble making it up the slope in snow and ice.

I got my Ridge in the spring, long after the snow melted, so I haven't driven it in the bad weather. I have the original set of rims in boxes having purchased the chrome wheels and am wondering if I should buy some snow tires and put them on.

Any thoughts?
 

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If your driveway is that steep and bad use studded snows (if legal in NJ) on your spare wheels.
 

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Re: Thinking about snow tires

tedridge said:
Sorry to raise this old post from the dead but I've got a question about the need for snow tires.

I live in NJ and have a terribly steep driveway that in the past has foiled my F150 4x4, without limited slip diff and no snow tires. Also my wife's new Toyota Sierra AWD with no snow tires has had trouble making it up the slope in snow and ice.

I got my Ridge in the spring, long after the snow melted, so I haven't driven it in the bad weather. I have the original set of rims in boxes having purchased the chrome wheels and am wondering if I should buy some snow tires and put them on.

Any thoughts?
What Steve said. My daughter has a deal with a tire shop, she has spare wheels with snow tires kept there. When the time comes, she goes in and have her tires swapped. With the RL, maybe you need only two studded snow tires (front or back?).So when the time comes, and you can't get up your driveway, back down and turn around and have them swapped.. :)
 

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For all those studded tire wonderers out there, here is the story:

U.S. metal-studded snow tire regulations
Survey Of States

This update of a survey of U.S. metal-studded snow tire regulations in all 50 states and the District of Columbia was compiled by the Tire Industry Safety Council and American Automobile Association. The latest survey reveals the following:

Thirty-three states and the District of Columbia set seasonal restrictions for metal-studded snow tire use.

Seven states have unrestricted use of metal-studded snow tires: Colorado, Kentucky, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Carolina, Vermont, and Wyoming.

Ten states prohibit metal-studded snow tires: Alabama, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Louisiana, Maryland (except in five mountainous counties), Minnesota, Mississippi, Texas, and Wisconsin.

The Council reminds drivers that when metal-studded snow tires are mounted on the front axle, they must also be placed on the rear axle for better handling and stability.

Since metal-studded snow tire regulations change frequently, check with local officials about legality in your area.

State Regulations
Alabama - Prohibited
Alaska - Sep 15 - May 1; South of 60 degrees - Sep 30 - Apr 15
Arizona - Oct 1 - May 1
Arkansas - Nov 15 - Apr 15
California - Nov 1 - Apr 1
Colorado - No Restrictions
Connecticut - Nov 15 - Apr 30
Delaware - Oct 15 - Apr 15
District of Columbia - Oct 15 - Apr 15
Florida - Prohibited
Georgia - Permitted only for driving on snow and/or ice
Hawaii - Prohibited
Idaho - Oct 1 - Apr 15
Illinois - Prohibited
Indiana - Oct 1 - May 1
Iowa - Nov 1 - Apr 1
Kansas - Nov 1 - Apr 15
Kentucky - No Restrictions
Louisiana - Prohibited
Maine - Oct 1-Apr 30
Maryland - Prohibited except in Allegheny, Carroll, Frederick, Garrett, and Washington counties Mar 31
Massachusetts - Nov 2 - Apr 30 unless otherwise authorized by registrar
Michigan - Nov 1 - Apr 1, Northern regions: Oct 1 - May 1
Minnesota - Prohibited except for nonresidents who are subject to restrictions imposed by their Reciprocity is granted. Full-time nonresident students employed within Minnesota permitted use of studded tires, regardless of vehicle registry
Mississippi - Prohibited
Missouri - Nov 1 - Mar 31
Montana - Oct 1 - May 1
Nebraska - Nov 1 - Apr 1 special permit issued by Dept of roads
Nevada - Oct 1 - Apr 30
New Hampshire - No Restrictions
New Jersey - Nov 15 - Apr 1
New Mexico - No Restrictions
New York - Oct 16 - Apr 30
North Carolina - No Restrictions
North Dakota - Oct 15 - Apr 15
Ohio - Nov 1 - Apr 15
Oklahoma - Nov 1 - Apr 1
Oregon - Nov 1 - Apr 30 unless specified differently by Dept of Transportation because of weather conditions
Pennsylvania - Nov 1 - Apr 15
Rhode Island - Nov 15 - Apr 1
South Carolina - Permitted for snow and ice driving if they do not protrude more than 1/16" from the tread
South Dakota - Oct 1 - Apr 30
Tennessee - Oct 1 - Apr 15
Texas - Prohibited
Utah - Oct 15 - Apr 15
Vermont - No Restrictions
Virginia - Oct 15 - Apr 15
Washington - Nov 2 - Mar 31
West Virginia - Nov 1 - Apr 15
Wisconsin - Not permitted except for cars with out of state registration (only if such car is passing through the state for a period of not more than 30 days
Wyoming - No Restrictions
 

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My experience with the NEW snow tires on the market, the ones bearing the Snowflake inside the Mountain Symbol on the tire, such as the Bridgestone Blizzak or Michelin's Alpin Ice, are truly remarkable tires when it comes to snow traction, and are very good on ice as well. Read all about them at www.tirerack.com. The Original Michelin's on the Ridge are rated on this sight as having very good snow traction so they might be good enough to get you up your driveway. If not, I'm sure that just snow tires w/o studs will do the job. Just my opinion. I too was considering snow tires but since the rating on the Michelins is so high I'm going to stay with them for now.
 

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dellorourke, thanks for the tip. I think I'm going to try the original tires for the first snow storm and see how they do. If I end up going with snows I'll take your advice and go with the ones without studs.
 

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tedridge said:
dellorourke, thanks for the tip. I think I'm going to try the original tires for the first snow storm and see how they do. If I end up going with snows I'll take your advice and go with the ones without studs.
The Federal Highway Administration did a study back in the 70's regarding studded snow tires versus regular snow tires. The results (albeit old) showed that studded tires only improved traction in smooth ice conditions (i.e. ice skating rink). The results also showed that studded tires reduced traction on dry pavement. For most driving conditions on ice, the studded tires did not provide an advantage in traction over good snow tires. Most driving conditions for ice can be described as rough ice from either snow pack, frozen slush, ice with sand or salt applied to it, etc.

Why was this information never widely publicized? It was released, but the public back lash was fierce. Studded tire owners are very loyal people and did not want to hear that a good set of regular snow tires driven with respect for the weather and road conditions actually were better.

Further more studded tires do a tremendous amount of damage to the pavement. Look at the list of states. Minnesota, a big snow state, has banned studded tires. Wisconsin also has severly limited thier use. Those two states wised up and realized that the amount of damage the studded tires were doing to pavement far exceeded any perceived traction benefit studded tires give.

I would venture to say that 99.5% of the drivers on the road should not be on the road during bad weather conditions if you can't drive with normal snow tires or all weather tires.
 

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Re: Thinking about snow tires

Spec out the New Michelin Latitude X-Ice ( There are the new generation to the Artic Alpine) I've had the Artic Alpine on previous vehicles and was very satisfied with them (road noise a bit loud on dry pavement) which I think can be expected due to a softer rubber compound. My personal rating on hard pack snow and ice "EXCELLENT" PS: The Latitude X-Ice got a top rating in the latest Consumer Reports for traction (but like other tires they do have their Cons.)
tedridge said:
Sorry to raise this old post from the dead but I've got a question about the need for snow tires.

I live in NJ and have a terribly steep driveway that in the past has foiled my F150 4x4, without limited slip diff and no snow tires. Also my wife's new Toyota Sierra AWD with no snow tires has had trouble making it up the slope in snow and ice.

I got my Ridge in the spring, long after the snow melted, so I haven't driven it in the bad weather. I have the original set of rims in boxes having purchased the chrome wheels and am wondering if I should buy some snow tires and put them on.

Any thoughts?
 

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Thanks for the advice both of you.

Ted
 

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I haven't really found a need for snow tires anywhere I have lived, although we did have chains for our car when we lived out in Washington/Oregon for a year (step father was in the military). Maybe it just isn't the same type of snowy conditions in New England that some people run into but we get some pretty good snow storms. I find that all weather treads have served me well as long as I use my brain when driving. In fact with the last few vehicles the stock tires have been so good that I couldn't even have fun in the snow up in Maine with them, no reverse donuts for me. And now with the Ridgeline there just isn't going to be a chance.
 

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It's really just my driveway that's such a b*tch to get up in the snow. If you check one of my other posts, the one with my mini cooper in the pic, you'll see my driveway in the background.
 

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I'll give my two cents on the studded snow-tire debate. I live in Colorado and have a long, steep, north-facing driveway. Until I bought my Ridgeline in March I owned a Range Rover with Michelin arctic tires. These worked really well except on ice or really hard-packed snow (snow packed down by the spinning tires of friends coming to visit). Even in these conditions they worked way better than the standard all season tires.

My wife drives a GMC Yukon XL Denali (AWD) and was having real trouble getting up (and down) the driveway until we bought her as set of studded snow tires. The difference on ice is incredible. I believe the Range Rover is a superior off road vehicle and yet the Denali performed much better when the snow turned to ice.

Consequently, I am most likely going to put some studded snow tires on this winter. Does anyone have any suggestions on what to install? Tires.com has no suggestions, and last time I checked tirerack.com there were no studded snow-tire recommendations.
 

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Taff, thanks for the input and welcome to the club.
 

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Here's a suggestion. Get a decorative box and put a set of old chains in it. Leave it at the bottom of the driveway. You could put them on to get up when you need them. Take them off on the way back out. With a little practice, chains are not hard to install.
 
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