Honda Ridgeline Owners Club Forums banner

Are you considering an EV in the near(ish) future?

  • Rivian R1T

    Votes: 25 22.9%
  • Ford F150 Lightning

    Votes: 23 21.1%
  • Lordstown Endurance

    Votes: 3 2.8%
  • Tesla Cybertruck

    Votes: 10 9.2%
  • Hummer EV

    Votes: 2 1.8%
  • Other

    Votes: 12 11.0%
  • Nope

    Votes: 63 57.8%
121 - 140 of 151 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,753 Posts
This one is for @feetdry

This camp stove setup is the most innovative bed tool since the Ridgeline:

We get in the Ridgeline and head to a restaurant to get a break from cooking, lol.

But if I spent that kinda $ on a truck I'd expect to live in it, so I guess a stove would be appropriate.
 

·
Registered
2020 RTL-E in pacific pewter metallic
Joined
·
2,752 Posts
We get in the Ridgeline and head to a restaurant to get a break from cooking, lol.

But if I spent that kinda $ on a truck I'd expect to live in it, so I guess a stove would be appropriate.
I'm ordering an R1T mostly because I can "fuel" it from our solar array. Getting away from most internal combustion engines here.

I already own a 36 hp zero turn mower that is totally electric and I absolutely love it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,753 Posts
I'm ordering an R1T mostly because I can "fuel" it from our solar array. Getting away from most internal combustion engines here.

I already own a 36 hp zero turn mower that is totally electric and I absolutely love it.
I'm just joking, and am actually pretty interested in EV progress/evolution. Sounds like a great way to leverage your solar-equipment investment.

What mower? I'm aware of Ryobi models from a year or two ago, but I think there are others in the market now - maybe Cub Cadet?
 

·
Super Moderator
2021 Radiant Red RTL
Joined
·
7,142 Posts
I'm just joking, and am actually pretty interested in EV progress/evolution. Sounds like a great way to leverage your solar-equipment investment.

What mower? I'm aware of Ryobi models from a year or two ago, but I think there are others in the market now - maybe Cub Cadet?
Cub Cadet is in the electric market, but like most everything else, none are available! It is going to cost us $850 (just for parts) to get our 50" Cub Cadet into top shape for next year, so we were contemplating going electric.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Pleease

·
Registered
2020 RTL-E in pacific pewter metallic
Joined
·
2,752 Posts
My mower is a Mean Green Rival. It will qualify for about a 22 percent federal tax credit from its purchase earlier this year because of solar charging. I have 3-1/2 acres to mow.

It's good on slopes because motors and batteries are 8" off ground. All upper metal is aluminum. Good answer for slopes. No maintenance or fluids or belts, just sharpen blades. Good for 8000 hours and then batteries down to 90 per cent.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,753 Posts
My mower is a Mean Green Rival. It will qualify for about a 22 percent federal tax credit from its purchase earlier this year because of solar charging. I have 3-1/2 acres to mow.
Wow, nice! Just googled it.

A friend has a Ryobi electric zero-turn, which he liked a lot last time I asked about it. He has a lot less space though - probably 1/2 acre.

ZT is the way to go for volume mowing, and with minimal noise I bet it's a great experience. We have a lake cabin where I wish I could use a zero turn, but half of it is quite steep, so I cut it with a 4wd subcompact Kubota tractor. The tractor is also useful for clearing brush with the loader bucket/tooth bar, etc. - very helpful out there in the "sticks".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
227 Posts
Wow, nice! Just googled it.

A friend has a Ryobi electric zero-turn, which he liked a lot last time I asked about it. He has a lot less space though - probably 1/2 acre.

ZT is the way to go for volume mowing, and with minimal noise I bet it's a great experience. We have a lake cabin where I wish I could use a zero turn, but half of it is quite steep, so I cut it with a 4wd subcompact Kubota tractor. The tractor is also useful for clearing brush with the loader bucket/tooth bar, etc. - very helpful out there in the "sticks".
Whats max angle that Kubota can handle? I have some 30 o angles with rocks here at my 2.6 acres. I tried to weed whack it but I can physically do it anymore. I even bought an ergonomic scythe that works pretty good but my spine and hips hate me.
 

·
Premium Member
2019 RTL awd, MSM
Joined
·
5,573 Posts
Whats max angle that Kubota can handle? I have some 30 o angles with rocks here at my 2.6 acres. I tried to weed whack it but I can physically do it anymore. I even bought an ergonomic scythe that works pretty good but my spine and hips hate me.
I have slopes approaching 30°, and I have been through the slope mowing song and dance. I had a Craftsman yard tractor that I used, with fluid-filled tires, but like all sub-$3k tractors, it used the ubiquitous K46 TuffTorq that seems to quickly wear out on any slope exceeding 5°, and the trans in that tractor was starting to slip. I changed it out (even though it is "non-serviceable") with synthetic fluid, which fixed it, but i soon traded it in.

After much research, my choices were a GT with a K66 TuffTorq or Hydrogear 630, with fluid-filled tires, or a Husqvarna 322T which seemed ideal but also seemed to have maintenance issues, or my third choice (which I went with) that was a steerable ZTR.

I ended up with a Cub Cadet SX54. The key here is that it has steerable front wheels, so you can maintain control on hillsides. I chose the SX model over the S model because of the larger Hydrogear ZT3100 drive motors - I didn't want to have to worry about the transmission(s) being the weak link, as they are in so many mowers.

I wanted a 48", but the nearest dealer only had a 54" unit, which he agreed to sell me at the 48" price. Add in 0% financing for 48 months from Cub Cadet and I ended up with a heavy duty mower. It is much heavier than I need (other than the drive motors), but now I have a mower that should last me a lifetime.

It has been working flawlessly for me, handles the slopes well (even crossing transversely), has parts that I can easily maintain and replace if needed, mows in reverse, etc. It is not the smoothest ride, but I can live with that. It also sits up higher than I'm used to, so I had to prune a few tree limbs around the property.

I purchased four years ago. They may have updated models out now. Key for me was having bigger drive motors. I would've settled for a much smaller mower, but you have to step up and pay up if you want drive motors that will last.

One other option that I did not thoroughly explore would have been a stand-on mower, or commercial walk-behind. They are almost as expensive as the CC ZTR I got, so just figured I would ride instead of walking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
227 Posts
I have slopes approaching 30°, and I have been through the slope mowing song and dance. I had a Craftsman yard tractor that I used, with fluid-filled tires, but like all sub-$3k tractors, it used the ubiquitous K46 TuffTorq that seems to quickly wear out on any slope exceeding 5°, and the trans in that tractor was starting to slip. I changed it out (even though it is "non-serviceable") with synthetic fluid, which fixed it, but i soon traded it in.

After much research, my choices were a GT with a K66 TuffTorq or Hydrogear 630, with fluid-filled tires, or a Husqvarna 322T which seemed ideal but also seemed to have maintenance issues, or my third choice (which I went with) that was a steerable ZTR.

I ended up with a Cub Cadet SX54. The key here is that it has steerable front wheels, so you can maintain control on hillsides. I chose the SX model over the S model because of the larger Hydrogear ZT3100 drive motors - I didn't want to have to worry about the transmission(s) being the weak link, as they are in so many mowers.

I wanted a 48", but the nearest dealer only had a 54" unit, which he agreed to sell me at the 48" price. Add in 0% financing for 48 months from Cub Cadet and I ended up with a heavy duty mower. It is much heavier than I need (other than the drive motors), but now I have a mower that should last me a lifetime.

It has been working flawlessly for me, handles the slopes well (even crossing transversely), has parts that I can easily maintain and replace if needed, mows in reverse, etc. It is not the smoothest ride, but I can live with that. It also sits up higher than I'm used to, so I had to prune a few tree limbs around the property.

I purchased four years ago. They may have updated models out now. Key for me was having bigger drive motors. I would've settled for a much smaller mower, but you have to step up and pay up if you want drive motors that will last.

One other option that I did not thoroughly explore would have been a stand-on mower, or commercial walk-behind. They are almost as expensive as the CC ZTR I got, so just figured I would ride instead of walking.
Thanks so much longboat and sorry to hijack the thread a bit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,753 Posts
Whats max angle that Kubota can handle? I have some 30 o angles with rocks here at my 2.6 acres. I tried to weed whack it but I can physically do it anymore. I even bought an ergonomic scythe that works pretty good but my spine and hips hate me.
All I know is "pretty dang steep", but just posed the question in a Kubota group - will let you know what I learn.

I actually do have a device that measures such angles, but won't be down there for a week or so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,753 Posts
I have slopes approaching 30°, and I have been through the slope mowing song and dance. I had a Craftsman yard tractor that I used, with fluid-filled tires, but like all sub-$3k tractors, it used the ubiquitous K46 TuffTorq that seems to quickly wear out on any slope exceeding 5°, and the trans in that tractor was starting to slip. I changed it out (even though it is "non-serviceable") with synthetic fluid, which fixed it, but i soon traded it in.

After much research, my choices were a GT with a K66 TuffTorq or Hydrogear 630, with fluid-filled tires, or a Husqvarna 322T which seemed ideal but also seemed to have maintenance issues, or my third choice (which I went with) that was a steerable ZTR.

I ended up with a Cub Cadet SX54. The key here is that it has steerable front wheels, so you can maintain control on hillsides. I chose the SX model over the S model because of the larger Hydrogear ZT3100 drive motors - I didn't want to have to worry about the transmission(s) being the weak link, as they are in so many mowers.

I wanted a 48", but the nearest dealer only had a 54" unit, which he agreed to sell me at the 48" price. Add in 0% financing for 48 months from Cub Cadet and I ended up with a heavy duty mower. It is much heavier than I need (other than the drive motors), but now I have a mower that should last me a lifetime.

It has been working flawlessly for me, handles the slopes well (even crossing transversely), has parts that I can easily maintain and replace if needed, mows in reverse, etc. It is not the smoothest ride, but I can live with that. It also sits up higher than I'm used to, so I had to prune a few tree limbs around the property.

I purchased four years ago. They may have updated models out now. Key for me was having bigger drive motors. I would've settled for a much smaller mower, but you have to step up and pay up if you want drive motors that will last.

One other option that I did not thoroughly explore would have been a stand-on mower, or commercial walk-behind. They are almost as expensive as the CC ZTR I got, so just figured I would ride instead of walking.
I live in Kentucky, and our hills are steep. My (home) yard isn't super large, but push-mowing when it's hot is brutal. Mowed it for more than 15 years with a Honda rear-engine rider, but flipped it once a few years ago - lucky I didn't break my back - and have been having trouble with the deck belt, but the thing is 21 years old and actually still runs well.

Got the Husqvarna R322T about two years ago, and I have to say its capabilities are nothing short of amazing - climbs about anything, turns a super-tight circle, and with the 48" deck out front I can get extremely close to trees, etc. - really cut down on weedeating/trimming. However the thing is persnickety. Ran very rough so had a shop work on the carb, and now it runs well, but needs a shot of starting fluid/ether to start when it's cold. Not sure what the transmission is off-hand, but probably the TuffTorq you mentioned as a dud.

After obtaining the Husqy I learned that the steering-wheel ZTs actually do steer the front wheels, making them - as you mentioned - good on hills. I think the more common type, with caster style wheels, would be nearly suicidal on hills like ours. Hopefully I'll get some years out of the Husqvarna, but when that croaks I'll likely go in the direction you went.

Is your CC's motor labeled "Cub Cadet", or with the manufacturer name? My Husqvarna has a Briggs & Stratton, and it seems really loud, plus, as mentioned, is something of a pig to start.
 

·
Premium Member
2019 RTL awd, MSM
Joined
·
5,573 Posts
@Pleease - the CC SX54 I have has a Kawasaki engine, along with the ZT3100 drive motors. I like that there is nothing too proprietary on the system.

I was really looking at the R322T, and probably would have been ideal for my situation, but there were numerous reports of leaking trans fluid when I was researching them. They have the K46 trans in the back, and a variation of it in the front, but I think the two of them working together would eliminate fears of burning them out, especially if they were serviceable (able to change fluid and filter). It was the leaking that caused me to shy away, with no real solution at the time (five years ago). If they were priced $1k cheaper, I'd probably be on one today. (Sounds a little like the Ridgeline - ha!)

@dysonanalysis - another option might be the robot mowers. They can go pretty steep, but when I was looking at them, they were meant for pretty tame grass (no tall grass, sticks or twigs). I have numerous trees in my yard, including ash trees, so I always have plenty of twigs laying around.... I'd spend more time picking them up than I would mowing!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
227 Posts
@Pleease - the CC SX54 I have has a Kawasaki engine, along with the ZT3100 drive motors. I like that there is nothing too proprietary on the system.

I was really looking at the R322T, and probably would have been ideal for my situation, but there were numerous reports of leaking trans fluid when I was researching them. They have the K46 trans in the back, and a variation of it in the front, but I think the two of them working together would eliminate fears of burning them out, especially if they were serviceable (able to change fluid and filter). It was the leaking that caused me to shy away, with no real solution at the time (five years ago). If they were priced $1k cheaper, I'd probably be on one today. (Sounds a little like the Ridgeline - ha!)

@dysonanalysis - another option might be the robot mowers. They can go pretty steep, but when I was looking at them, they were meant for pretty tame grass (no tall grass, sticks or twigs). I have numerous trees in my yard, including ash trees, so I always have plenty of twigs laying around.... I'd spend more time picking them up than I would mowing!
Thx, this is 9000' high mountain meadow that is like brush cutting and really only needs mowed maybe twice a year if we get rain. The rocks and steep rugged terrain is making me think hiring some boys with weed whackers with blades may be the best option. Of course getting anyone who isn't a meth head out here is tough too! LOL We just had one robbing folks until he was hunted down.
 

·
Premium Member
2019 RTL awd, MSM
Joined
·
5,573 Posts
T
Thx, this is 9000' high mountain meadow that is like brush cutting and really only needs mowed maybe twice a year if we get rain. The rocks and steep rugged terrain is making me think hiring some boys with weed whackers with blades may be the best option. Of course getting anyone who isn't a meth head out here is tough too! LOL We just had one robbing folks until he was hunted down.
That's a tough one. Best long-term solution may be landscaping / xeriscaping, and maybe put down some artificial grass where you want.

The newer cordless weedwhackers are starting to get decent. My old Echo won't give up the ghost, though.

Altoz makes a tracked ZTR, but then you're talking $13k.

Subcompact tractor is probably best overall answer, one that you can move the wheels out on the axle and fill tires with fluid. You just need enough other stuff to do with it to justify it - resale should be decent, too.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,290 Posts
30 degree slopes are Steiner territory. That said I do use my Simplicity Citation XT 61" deck, on my sloping back hill. I cut it sideways and don't have any problem. The key is the weight on the machine at 980 lbs. That makes it stable with those M60 size tires on it. They are wide and provide great traction. But, a Steiner machine is better for slopes overall and it has attachments for the front that really make the machine useful. I use a 54" rotating brush on it in the winter. No salt needed. Just clears the snow down to the pavement and the rest just dries off with a little sunshine.

Do a search on youtube for "Steinering the snow"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,753 Posts
@Pleease - the CC SX54 I have has a Kawasaki engine, along with the ZT3100 drive motors. I like that there is nothing too proprietary on the system.

I was really looking at the R322T, and probably would have been ideal for my situation, but there were numerous reports of leaking trans fluid when I was researching them. They have the K46 trans in the back, and a variation of it in the front, but I think the two of them working together would eliminate fears of burning them out, especially if they were serviceable (able to change fluid and filter). It was the leaking that caused me to shy away, with no real solution at the time (five years ago). If they were priced $1k cheaper, I'd probably be on one today. (Sounds a little like the Ridgeline - ha!)
It does drip a little in my garage, but it's right there by the reservoir - pretty sure I can stop it if I spend a little time tinkering - but in a couple years I've only added a very small amount of fluid. I'm not a small guy - 225# on a good day - but it doesn't seem to strain carrying me up the steepest part.

Wish it had the Kawasaki motor, as Kaw has a terrific reputation. Between that and drive motors it sounds like you have a pretty stout drivetrain, which is key in the long haul.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
227 Posts
30 degree slopes are Steiner territory. That said I do use my Simplicity Citation XT 61" deck, on my sloping back hill. I cut it sideways and don't have any problem. The key is the weight on the machine at 980 lbs. That makes it stable with those M60 size tires on it. They are wide and provide great traction. But, a Steiner machine is better for slopes overall and it has attachments for the front that really make the machine useful. I use a 54" rotating brush on it in the winter. No salt needed. Just clears the snow down to the pavement and the rest just dries off with a little sunshine.

Do a search on youtube for "Steinering the snow"
I’ve looked at Steiner but it’s too rich for me. To mow 2.6 acres twice a YEAR for a Cadillac of mowers would be a waste. Even if I could afford it!!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,290 Posts
The truth is that there isn't really a cheap Slope rated mower. There are cheap mowers that people try to use on slopes with bad results sometimes. Including tractors. They can be flat out dangerous on steep slopes. Even my Simplicity isn't rated for that work. It just happens to do a good job on my back hill.
 

·
Premium Member
2019 RTL awd, MSM
Joined
·
5,573 Posts
30 degree slopes are Steiner territory. That said I do use my Simplicity Citation XT 61" deck, on my sloping back hill. I cut it sideways and don't have any problem. The key is the weight on the machine at 980 lbs. That makes it stable with those M60 size tires on it. They are wide and provide great traction. But, a Steiner machine is better for slopes overall and it has attachments for the front that really make the machine useful. I use a 54" rotating brush on it in the winter. No salt needed. Just clears the snow down to the pavement and the rest just dries off with a little sunshine.

Do a search on youtube for "Steinering the snow"
I forgot about the Steiner! The Husqvarna R322T is like a light-duty poor man's version of the Steiner.

The cheapest slope mower you're going to find will be an old walk-behind push mower, if you have the time and energy. The ones with high wheels in the back are the most maneuverable, but I don't think they make those anymore, and definitely not self-propelled on the rear wheels (the front wheels won't have enough weight on the slopes). Heck, my Honda pusher spins the wheels going up any decent slope.... still have to push it, just not as hard!

Growing up on the farm, we baled hay on slopes approaching 30°. We set the wheels as far out on the axle as we could, and had them filled with fluid. Ag bar tires are also key here. One of my jobs was to walk behind the small round baler while Dad baled the hay.... I had to catch the bale when it popped out of the baler, then turn it perpendicular to the slope so that it wouldn't roll down the hill. Ah, the smell of fresh-cut alfalfa!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
227 Posts
The truth is that there isn't really a cheap Slope rated mower. There are cheap mowers that people try to use on slopes with bad results sometimes. Including tractors. They can be flat out dangerous on steep slopes. Even my Simplicity isn't rated for that work. It just happens to do a good job on my back hill.
used 2X a year limits what you'd want out here.....the rest of the time it could snowblow or push snow but the better half would probably not buy that! LOL
 
121 - 140 of 151 Posts
Top