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This morning, I wasn't feeling well and came home early from work to rest. This afternoon, I got to feeling much better and was craving Olive Garden, so I decided to place a to-go order. After driving 20 minutes to pick it up, I realized I left my wallet at home. I was going to pay with Apple Pay using my Apple Watch, but their Ziosk wasn't cooperating. The manager handed me the $20 order and told me it was on the house! I called back after returning home to try and pay for the order, but she insisted that it was complimentary. There are still good people around!
 

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It's a good to get repeat and more customers...'word of mouth' advertising can be the best - or worst for a business.
I've been known to go online and let the corporate office know who it was and what they did. They tend to give the manager/employee good feedback and sometimes they get the coveted "Employee of the Week" parking space.
 

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Not exactly paying it forward, but...

The lady that cuts my hair has a nephew whose father abandoned him as a child. Despite having a rough life, he managed to put himself through barber school and became a barber at age 23. He drives a worn-out Chevrolet truck with well over 300K miles and has to drive that gas guzzler 45 miles to work and back every day.

Several weeks ago, I overhead him mention he wanted a hot towel cabinet so he could increase his service offerings, but couldn't afford one. He had a friend who had one they weren't using, but weren't willing to part with. I ordered one online a few weeks ago, but was undecided on how to give it to him. I considered shipping it anonymously, but that seemed unnecessary. I thought about just bringing it to him, but I was afraid that might be a little awkward.

Last week when I went in for a hair cut, I caught him off to the side and said, "Did I overhear you say you wanted a towel warmer a while back?" "Yes", he replied. I asked if he ever found one and he said no. I said, "Well, good. I ordered one a while back and never used it. It's too late to return it, so I figured you might get some use out of it" and brought it in to him. You would have thought I just bought him a new car! He unwrapped it like a kid on Christmas morning! His aunt quietly thanked me and said she'd been wanting to buy him one, but her funds had been tight lately as well.

The price of that towel warmer was insignificant to me, but it meant a great deal to a struggling young barber.
 

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Regardless of what and which higher power we believe in (or not) we all possess the ability and capacity to be decent human beings. However the 'decency' is a byproduct of one's choice to be as such.

I believe in a God who gives us what we need and gave us a 'soul' to understand those in need and care for them. You sir, did a great deal to that man and I am very sure that the effect you have on him will reap many benefits in that man's life. God will, and as always, be watching over you as you have demonstrated what basic morality is.

From simple acts of kindness to gestures, we foster the attitude of 'faith' in humanity and keep the world balanced among the chaos and evil that erupts everywhere. Thanks @zroger73 for sharing that.
 

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Similar story. When I was dating my bride, on Christmas day, she told me that we were going to deliver prepared meals to the apartments of some elderly Church members. This was in Queens, NY and these folks were the real deal, seen everything, done everything and they aren't easily surprised. I don't think these folks were expecting these meals but when my wife knocked on those doors and explained what we were delivering, the gratitude that they expressed I will never forget. Their faces just opened up with such gratitude, it was like they got something much more than a meal and we chatted with a lot of them. You could tell this really made their day. How this made me feel tops any present, and I can't tell you how good I felt about the deed we did. I should make my kids do this, I definitely failed in that department when X-Mas morning is ruined because of the sulking about not having the latest and greatest IPhone. From that point on, we toned down Xmas a bit and now I the kids get it.
 

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@14v6 , societal competition, in this day and age, created certain expectation in our generation. It is not our kid's fault that they feel dejected, when their friends showcase cool and new 'things' they got from Santa. I was born and raised in India for 15 years of my life and I have been in America for 21 years. I can tell you the reason I am this way is because of the great parents I have, which I cannot say the same for many folks here in the US. Child rearing in America is very tough as the culture is very 'different'. Though the Asian culture (every single country that make up the continent of Asia) can be viewed at old-school, out of touch with modern times, cruel, and anything in between, I can tell you that it taught me the sense of gratitude and appreciation for what I have. Every year, on my Grandmother's (mom's mom) death anniversary, my parents feed the needy by making food and feeding them at church. Now that we are here, my mom makes sure that money is sent to the church and my aunt who still lives there, oversees the efforts. For many, including here in the US, basic things are indeed luxury as the poverty for them is real. I give thanks and praise to God for giving me everything that I need and much more. It is a 'luxury' for me to have what I have, even though I, like many here, work hard for it; yet is the grace and mercy of God that I have what I have.

Keep the stories coming! :)
 

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@smufguy, i have to wonder if we'd have fewer domestic mass shootings if our kids were raised in a different situation, perhaps as you describe in the way you were raised.

I grew up in a large family, dirt-poor but experience-rich, on the South Dakota prairie. My parents would make a trip to the big town (population 15,000) about an hour away, a couple times a year. Usually, 2 or 3 of us kids got to go along. Mom would pack a cooler, and lunch for the day consisted of homemade bologna sandwiches and a water jug, maybe some koolaid or a soda if we were really lucky. This was in between store visits where our parents would purchase staples for upcoming needs in the months ahead.

Saturday night was a special treat for us kids. Dad would get out a bottle of HyVee store-brand soda (these were 32-oz returnable glass bottles), some glasses and a measuring cup, and we'd each get 2-2.5oz of soda. Later, in the late 1970s, we might get some vanilla ice cream with it and have homemade sodas. We kids thought we were living large then! We even got a color TV in 1978!

I appreciate that childhood. I learned to be very resourceful, and it serves me well to this day.
 

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@longboat I attribute many of the 'wayside' behaviors, small to big, to lacking some sort of 'religious based faith' in life. This does not mean that non-believers are not good people; I am not saying that at all as many of such good natured people do exist. However, when things get rough in life, everyone turns to someone for guidance and many get tired of turning to people and not finding their bearing/answer.

I was grateful to be born into a family that taught me Christianity (I am only a 5th generation Christian) but also taught me to be mindful and respectful of other people's beliefs. I have been to Hindu Temples, Mosques and Synagogues. I was also taught how to handle confrontation, when I was faced with it. Nowadays, with much of the 'free' and 'handouts' being provided with little to no accountability, it is difficult for people to deal challenges and resolve confrontation. I believe this is why they resort to violence in both action and words.

I have a wife who was born and raised here in the US with family spanning to Germany and Italy (though she is a mutt lol) and her upbringing is totally different as her parents raised them very differently. However they are great parents who are God fearing as well. We have a wonderful son who is 3-years old and I always tell people that my job as a father would be a success, if others tell me that he is a good boy. Though he is only 3, I tell him why his 'dad' yelled at him and why certain things are bad and also follow up with what is the right thing to do. When him and I were playing with his Thomas & Friends toys this weekend, he started singing 'My God is so big, so strong and so might, there's nothing my God cannot do' and even recounting it now, I still tear up. The impact my faith has on me and seeing that in my son, who unknowingly sings it, is beyond words. There are certain things he can make his decisions on and certain things he needs to 'listen' to his parents. I want to, along with my wife, equip my son with enough correct and proper knowledge, so he can make wise decisions for himself, others and one day for my wife and I.

To revert back to the topic here, I still believe there is much good in this world, but it is not broadcast-ed as much and frequently as the devastation and perils because such things do not sell. Media cannot just run 'good' deeds on TV and boost ratings. I think it is the human make up these days that we tend to gravitate and spend too much time talking and thinking about evil things that happen and pay very little to the good things that happen, let alone the good things we can do.
 
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