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Discussion Starter #1
I have 4300 miles on my truck. HAL tells me my oil is at 50%. I have heard that after the first oil change the vehicle will get better gas mileage. So I am considering having my oil changed now, so that I can see better gas mileage.

Currently I get 14 in town and 18 on the highway. I drive mostly Highway.

So I have the following questions:
1) What was your mileage on your first oil change?
2) Did you see improved gas mileage after your first oil change?
3) Do you know if the dealership can make adjustments to the truck/engine which will improve gas mileage?
 

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WhiteRL said:
I have 4300 miles on my truck. HAL tells me my oil is at 50%. I have heard that after the first oil change the vehicle will get better gas mileage. So I am considering having my oil changed now, so that I can see better gas mileage.

Currently I get 14 in town and 18 on the highway. I drive mostly Highway.

So I have the following questions:
1) What was your mileage on your first oil change?
2) Did you see improved gas mileage after your first oil change?
3) Do you know if the dealership can make adjustments to the truck/engine which will improve gas mileage?
From all the posts I've read here, it is highly recommended to leave the oil alone until HAL says so...to allow the break in oil to do it's job. A little more patience...from what I've seen, you'll be changing oil between 5500 to 7000 miles. And yes it seems that MPH seem to improve. YOU'RE LAST QUESTION IS INTERESTING..I'D LIKE TO HEAR ANYONE'S INPUT.. :)
 

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I have just had my first oil change at 5200 mile, HAL state 40% Also the truck was 4 months old & the oil was looking grungy. I have not really noticed much change in gas milage, I have kind of slowed down alittle due to the high cost of gas. But before I was getting 18 to 22mpg with mixed driving :)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Wow ... I was hopping to get more response in this. :(

My truck does not get the advertised gas milage. 16.6 on last tank 95% highway driving. I am really interested in knowing if the first oil change will result in better gas mileage. What has your experience been? Thanks
 

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I really doubt that you'll notice that much change.
As many other threads have covered, you can infact get advertised mpg and better... but it's all in how you drive it.
 

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From what my dealer tells me (and they have been very good so far with correct info), HAL only works properly after the initial break in oil is changed to normal operating oil. There are supposedly special additives in this initial oil to aid in break in. Honda is recommending about a 4000 mile break in to the dealers for recommending to us owners. After that, HAL should compute about a 7500 mile change interval.
 

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As shingles said, we have pretty much beat this issue to death in various other threads re oil, interval changes, mileage/time factors, oil life monitor, etc. But I can't answer your question specifically as I only have about 2700 miles on my Ridgeline and the oil life monitor reads 70%. I too have heard that after the first oil change you do get better gas mileage. Maybe that is because the vehicle is broken-in better by that time, I don't know but I am sure it is on a case by case basis.

I will change my oil at 5000 miles which I estimate will be close enough to HAL's 15% service notice on oil. I could go a thousand, maybe even two thousand more miles but 5000 miles on a factory fill is fine for me. Usually I would change it out way before that but Honda is specific about keeping the factory fill oil in until service is due. The reason, IMO, is that they use a lot of moly as a factory lubricant when making their engines. This of course is mixed with the oil and Honda engines have a reputation for doing well with moly, which is an excellent break-in lubricant. I also intend to verify my opinions as to oil change intervals and brand by sending in an oil sample for analysis. I then can determine if the oil I have selected is doing the job with this engine for my driving conditions and change intervals. It will tell me if I can go longer with my intervals or if I need to change more often. If I find I must change more often, I may try a synthetic.

Honda, again, IMO, would like to see several thousand miles initially on their engines with a higher dose of moly than most oils contain. This really helps to protect the engine during this period. If you change oil sooner, Honda has no way of knowing what kind of oil you will use. There are some excellent addititve packages in some oils that contain no moly at all - there is more than one way to lubricate - but Honda goes the moly route. The factory fill, as I understand it, is not some super secret break-in oil but rather a Superflo like formula made for them by ExxonMobil. It is the factory engine lubricants that mix with the oil that Honda wants to keep in there during the first few thousand miles.

I intend to use Havoline 5w20 when it comes time to change oil. It has proven to be one of the very best "dino" oils from recent used oil analysis reports on a variety of cars and under a variety of conditions. It is also one of the most moly-loaded oils you can buy (as far as I know, only the synthetic Redline oil contains more moly). It is also a bargain as you can usually get a case on sale for about $1.50 a qt.
 

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I can't remember the exact mileage, but it was around 5000. I do know it was a few hundred miles befor the recommended interval, because we we're going on a long trip. But sense then I changed when maintance minder said. I went to syn. Mobil 1(Honda). As for better gas mileage it has stayed about the same, 15 to 18 city maybe 20 highway best I got so far 21.5. I also started burning a higher octane gas in hopes that will help mileage. I have decided to treat my baby to the best I can afford.
 

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This entire topic is the result of the fact that the Ridge comes with only ONE choice of engines, ONE choice of transmissions and ONE choice of diferential gearing. No matter what your preferances are, you get what they offer, ONE package. As a result, the guy who wants to blow V-8 Silverado's and V-10 Dodges off the road is dissatisfied. The guy who wants the milage of a 4 cylinder mini-truck is dissatisfied. You can't satisfy everyone when there is only one choice.
If you want 255 horses and they happen at 5,000 rpm you are going to fill those 6 cylinders with gas 5,000 times in a minute. If you had a V-8 and it achieves 255 horses at 3,000 rpm you are only filling those 8 cylinders 3000 times in a minute. (It is actually 1/2 in both cases because these are 4 cycle engines). Here is the clincher: 6 cylinders X 5,000 rpm = 30,000 cylinders of gas. 8 cylinders X 3,000 rpm = 24,000 cylinders of gas. If you NEED 255 horses, the V-8 will do it cheaper and with less engine wear. That is why a V-8 is the engine of choice ina WORK truck. The Ridge is a SUT (SPORT Utility Truck). The horses are there if you need them but fuel economy is there also, if that is your real goal.
My Silverado 5.7 liter/5 speed manual transmission will get better gas mileage than my Ridge towing my boat, but without the boat the Chevy's milage is the virtually the same. On the other hand, without the boat my Ridge carrying 1,000 lbs of cargo in the bed, out performs the Chevy by 5 mpg.
 

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If you want 255 horses and they happen at 5,000 rpm you are going to fill those 6 cylinders with gas 5,000 times in a minute. If you had a V-8 and it achieves 255 horses at 3,000 rpm you are only filling those 8 cylinders 3000 times in a minute. (It is actually 1/2 in both cases because these are 4 cycle engines). Here is the clincher: 6 cylinders X 5,000 rpm = 30,000 cylinders of gas. 8 cylinders X 3,000 rpm = 24,000 cylinders of gas.
A bit oversimplified, don't you think? First of all, the cylinders aren't filling with gas, they are filling with a gas/air mixture and you are assuming that the amount of gas is equal in both cases, which isn't necessarily so. Second, you are assuming that the volume of the cylinders is the same, which they aren't. The volume of a 3.5L V6 cylinder would be 3.5/6 = 0.583 L while a 5.7L V8 would be 5.7/8 = 0.713 L, so not only are there more cylinders, they are bigger. Third, you are assuming that the efficiency of the engines are the same, which is also untrue. And that's not even taking into account things like vehicle weight, gear ratios, automatic vs. manual, etc. I am not disagreeing with the rest of your post, but your analogy muddies the water.
 

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Pickey, pickey pickey !! I DID NOT state that the cylinders were being filled with GASOLINE. The fuel/air mixture is technically a GAS. Yes vehicle weight, aerodynamics and other factors such as compression ratios are also factor but this wasn't meant to be a doctoral thesis on automotive engineering. :)

PS Give me a break, this was my first post in this forum.:) :)

EDIT: Using your displacement numbers, .583/cyliner for the V-6 and .713/ cylinder fot the V-8 I get the following:

.713cuinX1500rpmX8cylinders=8556 cuin of fuel air mixture 1500rpm=1/2 3000 actual rpm
.583cuinX2500rpmX6cylinders=8745 cuin of fuel air mixture 2500rpm=1/2 5000rpm actual rpm

The fuel consumption to achieve 255 Hp is virtually the same. Simplistic as my model was, it matches one of the fundimental laws of physics.
 

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The following comments are just my point of view. Any corrections are welcome.

The manufacture put in the additive to the new engine oil called "Moly" (Molybdenum Disulfide). That’s why they recommended in the owner’s manual to follow the oil life monitor to have the first oil changed.

1) I have not changing my first oil yet. Still too new for me (three weeks).
2) Can’t say that yet too. If anyone sees the mileage improvement after the first oil changed I can only assumed that after you drained the manufacture’s break-in oil (maybe the additive is a little thicker) it has less friction thus improves the mileage. The engine is broken in may also help.
3) I personally don’t believe that dealer can adjust anything to improve the overall mileage. After all this is the new engine still. Like the other thread mentioned, many factors affecting your mileage. i.e. tire pressure, driving habit, cd (coefficient drag), the load, etc. You get the idea.
 

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also, consider that we or depending on your region..may have switched to blended type Fuel i.e. oxygenated fuels. I've noticed my mpg is also down, and i've check my tires and other helpfull hints to get better milage on any vehicle. Yes, changing engine oil will help increase mpg. I'm also thinking to switch to full syntectic and find a really good oil filter or use the factory filters. Change air in the tires to Nitrogen, it may not help but it will help in the long run and keep the tires at the right preassure.
 

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shortspark said:
Maybe that is because the vehicle is broken-in better by that time, I don't know but I am sure it is on a case by case basis.
I feel that this is likely the basis for claims that mileage should improve after the first oil change. I don't think that the first oil change will magically impact fuel economy.
 

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I just did my first oil change this morning to Mobil 1 5-20. I have been keeping very detailed mileage statistics for my full 5200 miles (before and after winter formula change, before and after 87 to 89 octane test). I look forward to sharing my results (good or bad) of oil change impact after I take about a month of fill up statisitics. My driving style is very stable and the routes I take very consistant day in and day out and I always fill up at same gas station so this should be a good controlled test. So far, using 89 octane (last 4 fill ups have been winter formulation and also 89 octane so I will stick with it for another 4 or so fill ups) have generated an average of 16.5 mpg. I live in an congested traffic area and 90% of my driving is at 40 mph or less with lots of stop and go. With this type driving, this is basically the mileage numbers I expected. The best I ever got was around 19 on about a 50% highway tank during a trip out to Montauk Point (summer formulation).
 

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For All Those Worried About Gas Mileage, Let Me Offer You A Little "INSIGHT." They Were Sitting About 3 Rows Over From The Ridgelines At My Dealers Lot. 50 Mpg And No Room For All Your Weekend Toys. I Love My Ridge The More I Drive It And The Mpg's Are A Small Price To Pay For Such A Great Truck.
 

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rstribling said:
For All Those Worried About Gas Mileage, Let Me Offer You A Little "INSIGHT." They Were Sitting About 3 Rows Over From The Ridgelines At My Dealers Lot. 50 Mpg And No Room For All Your Weekend Toys. I Love My Ridge The More I Drive It And The Mpg's Are A Small Price To Pay For Such A Great Truck.
rstribling.....not to get into a whizzing match with you.... but that's a little presumptious, don't you think?!? I think the people here in the ROC have every right to express their concerns about anything they want to about their truck. They earn that right with every monthly payment. If you don't like it.... Let me offer you a little "INSIGHT"....they are sitting right next to each other...in the Honda Ridgeline Owners Club Forums....a bunch of other threads you can read. A lot of talk about Ridgelines and no talk about mileage and I am sure you can find one where nobody is complaining.

Yes, there is definitely a trade off, depending on which vehicle you purchase. An Accord/Civic will give you great gas mileage, but there's no room to haul stuff. A Ridgeline gives you plenty of space but the mileage isn't so great. And, yes, we all bought into it when we drove off the lot....but to say the ROC members can't talk about it, just because it bugs you....well, that just ain't right.
 

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Waterbug said:
Pickey, pickey pickey !! I DID NOT state that the cylinders were being filled with GASOLINE. The fuel/air mixture is technically a GAS. Yes vehicle weight, aerodynamics and other factors such as compression ratios are also factor but this wasn't meant to be a doctoral thesis on automotive engineering. :)

PS Give me a break, this was my first post in this forum.:) :)

EDIT: Using your displacement numbers, .583/cyliner for the V-6 and .713/ cylinder fot the V-8 I get the following:

.713cuinX1500rpmX8cylinders=8556 cuin of fuel air mixture 1500rpm=1/2 3000 actual rpm
.583cuinX2500rpmX6cylinders=8745 cuin of fuel air mixture 2500rpm=1/2 5000rpm actual rpm

The fuel consumption to achieve 255 Hp is virtually the same. Simplistic as my model was, it matches one of the fundimental laws of physics.
You've made too many assumptions. The amount of fuel used by an engine is not solely a function of engine RPM and the volume of the cylinder.
 

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Dale said:
You've made too many assumptions. The amount of fuel used by an engine is not solely a function of engine RPM and the volume of the cylinder.
Your statement is true for day to day driving where weather, wind, terrain, vehicle weight, load, driver interaction etc. are variable factors, but for a dyno test where HP determinations are made and all of the veriables are removed, my assumptions and the laws of physics hold true. Horse Power out is directly proportianal to fuel consumed. The auto manufacturer who can over come that law of physics WILL have a monoply on the market.
 

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I plan of running Mobil 1 5-30WT as soon as the break-in period is over.
I know the next question....."but the manual says to use 5-20WT???". The auto manufacturers have a hard time making engines to meet the federally mandated CAFE standards. To help free up the engine a little (reduce friction) they run a lower weight oil. Hence the 5-20WT oil. Running a slightly heavier oil will not make an appreciable difference in MPG.
Living in Florida where the average summer daytime highs are in the mid to upper 90's, I'll run the heavier weight oil to help protect the engine.

BTW I have been using Mobil 1 for over 450,000 miles in five vehicles. I have yet to see an oil related failure.
 
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